Centre Staff

Centre Staff

Centre Staff

Dr Catherine Bishop

Postdoctoral Fellow

Catherine Bishop

Catherine Bishop is a 2019 ARC DECRA Fellow at the Centre for Workforce Futures at Macquarie University. She received her PhD from the Australian National University in 2012, and is the author of Minding Her Own Business: Colonial Businesswomen in Sydney (NewSouth, 2015), which won the 2016 Ashurst Business Literature Prize. She has worked in several universities, most recently as a Kathleen Fitzpatrick Junior Research Fellow with the University of Sydney’s ARC Laureate Research Program in International History, and has published widely on the history of gender and business. She received a New Zealand History Trust Award in 2016 to research her second monograph Women Mean Business: Enterprise in Colonial New Zealand, to bepublished in 2019 by Otago University Press.

Her postdoctoral research project investigates the history of women running small businesses in Australia since 1880. She is also co-editing a collection about nineteenth century global female entrepreneurship (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020) and will be a Visiting Fellow at Northumbria University in the UK in 2019. Her other research interests include the biography of an Australian female missionary, for which she was the 2016 State Library of New South Wales Religious History Fellow, and the history of two Cold War World Youth Forums in the USA and the UK.

Lynne Cousins

Research Grant Project Manager

Lynne Cousins

Lynne has been servicing research centres at Macquarie University for more than 6 years and is experienced in optimising outcomes for all stakeholders. She has a BSc (Hons, UNSW) and an MBA (UTS) along with 10 years’ industry experience, as well as experience in Research Services at the University.

Dr Nour Dados

Postdoctoral Fellow

Nour Dados

Dr Nour Nicole Dados was awarded her PhD from the University of Technology Sydney (2011). She has worked as a researcher at the University of Sydney, the University of Technology Sydney and in the union sector. Her work examines the institutional and social contexts in which neoliberalism produces experiences of precarity. She is currently working on a project about the impact of labour insecurity on knowledge production and knowledge workers in insecure employment. Her research crosses critical social science and social history and makes use of archival, textual and empirical methods to study the embodied and structural dimensions of precarity in institutions and society.

Jason Antony

Project Officer

Jason Antony has worked with the Industrial Relations Research Centre at UNSW since 2005, where he assists with editing the Centre's Journal, The Economic and Labour Relations Review and also works as an administrator. He joined the Centre for Workforce Futures in mid-2017, and helps manage the Centre's website as well as its day-to-day activities.

Back to the top of this page