Diamond Science and Technology - Macquarie University

Diamond Science and Technology - Macquarie University

Diamond Science and Technology - Macquarie University

The Macquarie University Research Centre for Diamond Science and Technology

Diamond Research Centre Fields

Diamond is well known for its hardness and gem-like beauty but its only recently that we have discovered that diamond has many other unique features that makes it ideal for developing new technologies. Scientists are using diamond to develop new applications spanning a huge range of topics including medical, optical, sensing, and electrical technologies.

Examples of these include state-of-the-art audio speakers which include novel diamond tweeters,  new types of high powered lasers, tiny nanodoctors – delivering drugs inside the body, through to magnetic sensors and microscopes which can image the magnetic properties of materials at unprecedented spatial resolutions.

Diamond is one of the best conductors of heat we know of and coupled with its semiconducting properties and chemical inertness, has led researchers to develop new types of diamond-based integrated electronic chips for use in high power circuits or in extreme environments (nanosats, mines, underwater). Diamond is one of the stiffest materials known and this also has led researchers to develop micro-mechanical diamond oscillators which can oscillate almost as fast as light at microwave frequencies – opening up new routes for sensors and interconnection devices.

The Macquarie University Research Centre for Diamond Science and Technology (DSciT), brings together researchers from a wide range of disciplines (physics, chemistry, molecular science, engineering and cognitive science), to focus on developing novel solutions to tomorrow’s questions using the unique and fascinating properties of diamond.

If you want to be a part of our community – follow us on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/groups/12222136/

Ondrej operating diamond laser equipment

Photo by Justine Ho - Diamond Laser Research - Macquarie University

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