Research News

RESEARCH
 Blood test discovered for MS

Blood test discovered for MS

An international study, led by Macquarie University researchers Dr Edwin Lim and Professor Gilles Guillemin, has discovered the first blood biomarker –  a chemical identifier in the blood – for multiple sclerosis (MS), a debilitating disorder of the central nervous system that affects more than 23,000 Australians and 2.3 million people worldwide. The findings, which took 12 years to di...

RESEARCH

How ethnicity and religion can influence financial habit

New research has found that people with a religious or ethnic background are more likely to save money, quelling the long-held belief that income and financial proficiency are the main determinates of an individual’s ability to save. Alongside a team of international researchers, Associate Professor Chris Baumann of Macquarie University’s Department of Marketing and Management studied low, ...

RESEARCH
 Creating stepping stones to healthier habitats

Creating stepping stones to healthier habitats

More than half of Australia's threatened species occur within the urban fringe: Sydney alone is home to 68 threatened birds, 28 threatened mammals and five threatened frogs. For residents concerned about disappearing wildlife the scale of the issue can be overwhelming, but a new online tool is helping to create wildlife-friendly stopovers between existing corridors. The team at Macquarie’...

RESEARCH
 Seals help plug Antarctic water mystery

Seals help plug Antarctic water mystery

Elephant seals have helped scientists to demonstrate that fresh water from Antarctic’s melting ice shelves slows the processes responsible for the formation of deep-water ocean currents that regulate global temperatures. The study was led by Dr Guy Williams from the Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies and Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems CRC together with Professor Rob Harcourt from...

RESEARCH
 Ice-aged Aboriginal art uncovered in the Kimberley

Ice-aged Aboriginal art uncovered in the Kimberley

What may be the longest, most impressive and complex rock art sequence anywhere in the world has been found in the remote Kimberley region of Western Australia. Evidence from recent excavations in the northwest Kimberley show that humans occupied the northern coastline as early as 36,000 years ago. The art of the region could potentially challenge Western Europe as the location for the p...

RESEARCH
 Cell colour technology wins Eureka Prize

Cell colour technology wins Eureka Prize

Professor Ewa Goldys, Deputy Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) at Macquarie University, together with CNBP research affiliate Dr Martin Gosnell have won the ANSTO ‘Innovative Use of Technology’ award at the 2016 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes. They were recognised for their innovative colour-focused research, which is able to distinguish between...