Discrete Choice Experiment project - Topic descriptions

Discrete Choice Experiment project - Topic descriptions

Evaluating management and prevention of medication errors in paediatric acute care: a discrete choice experiment


Topic descriptions
  1. Medication error rates: Patients in hospitals can sometimes experience errors in their care. Medication errors are not common, and do not usually cause any harm, but reducing rates still further may impact the resources available for other care improvement programs.
  2. Medication reviews: Getting the right mix and doses of medications for very ill children can be difficult as medications given to treat one problem can interact with other medications your child is taking, or in some cases can affect other aspects of their illness. A Medication Review helps ensure your child is on the safest and most effective mix of medications.
  3. Information on medication errors: Most errors that occur in hospital do not result in any harm to your child. Being told of any errors involving your child can be important so that you are aware of all aspects of their care, but for some parents too much information, where the child is not harmed, can cause additional stress.
  4. Access to non-urgent care: Clinical response teams are always available to deal with medical emergencies in hospital. However, for less urgent care, hospitals need to carefully manage resources to ensure a sufficient number of qualified staff are available to provide ongoing support and advice to parents and patients within a reasonable time frame.
  5. Ward structure: Most wards have a mixture of single-bed rooms and two-bed rooms, as well as beds on the general ward area. Some children need to be treated in a single room because of infection risks or for specialised care. Some parents prefer the privacy of a single room, whereas others prefer the visibility of the general wards.
  6. Cost and availability of parking: Access to parking is often a critical issue when bringing a sick child to hospital, when public transport is not possible, or when trying to bring your child to hospital for time critical treatment. However this needs to be considered with the cost of parking.
  7. Length of stay: The length of time your child needs to spend in hospital can sometimes be extended due to a range of factors related to coordination of your child’s care rather than their underlying treatment. For example, specialised drugs may not be available immediately on admission and may even delay admission, an operation may need to be delayed, or you may need to wait for test results before being discharged.
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