Public Lecture: The promiscuous hippocampus - The role of the medial temporal lobe in memory, perception and emotion

Public Lecture: The promiscuous hippocampus - The role of the medial temporal lobe in memory, perception and emotion

Event Name Public Lecture: The promiscuous hippocampus - The role of the medial temporal lobe in memory, perception and emotion
Start Date 11 Jul 2018 2:00 pm
End Date 11 Jul 2018 3:30 pm
Duration 1 hour and 30 minutes
Description

Speaker: Professor Andrew Yonelinas
Date: Wednesday 11 July 2018
Time : 2.00 pm - 3.30 pm followed by light refreshments
Location: Lecture Theatre 4002 (Messel), Sydney Nanoscience Hub, Physics Rd, The University of Sydney

Abstract

Our ability to remember the important events that make up our lives is critically dependent on the medial temporal lobe (MTL). Recent work,however, has suggested that different subregions within the MTL may support distinct mnemonic processes and that they may play important roles in cognitive tasks beyond traditional tests of long term episodic memory. I will describe work showing that the hippocampus plays a central role in binding together and subsequently recollecting the different aspects that make up an episode or event, whereas other regions such as the perirhinal cortex can support familiarity-based memory discriminations even when recollection fails. In addition, I present evidence that the hippocampus is involved in supporting short-term memory and even visual perception, when those tasks involve high-resolution or complex bindings. I will then focus in the unique role of emotion in episodic memory and show that the amygdala supports recollection of emotional bindings that exhibit relatively slow forgetting compared to hippocampal bindings. Finally, I will examine the effects of acute stress on different MTL regions and present data showing that post-encoding stress can rescue memory from the effects of forgetting by acting as a mnemonic filter.

For more information, including registration, click here.

Content owner: Department of Cognitive Science Last updated: 29 May 2018 12:21pm

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