Visitors

Visitors

Distinguished Visitors Program

CAVE Visitor Sally Haslanger (MIT)CAVE will fund the visit of at least one distinguished international researcher each year for a period of up to four weeks. Successful applicants will be selected by the Executive committee on the basis of outstanding research in an area corresponding to one of the centre's five research clusters.

Other visitors

Apart from our distinguished visitors program, CAVE welcomes applications from scholars whose research interests fit CAVE's profile and who would be interested in visiting the centre during a period of sabbatical or for a shorter stay.

For information on applying to become a visitor, please see our Work With Us page.

Expressions of interest should be addressed to the director, Prof. Catriona Mackenzie.

Visitors to CAVE

Current visitors

There are no visitors currently at CAVE.

Upcoming visitors

Watch this space for 2017 visitors!

Past visitors

David Matas (B'nai Brith Canada) - CAVE Public Lecture 2016

CAVE Visitor David Matas David Matas is an international human rights lawyer, author and researcher based in Winnipeg and currently acts as Senior Honorary Counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. He has served the government of Canada in numerous positions including as member of the Canadian delegation to the United Nations Conference on an International Criminal Court; the Task Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research; and the Organization on Security and Cooperation in Europe Conferences on Antisemitism and Intolerance. He has also been involved in several different organizations, including the Canadian Helsinki Watch Group, Beyond Borders, Amnesty International, and the Canadian Council for Refugees.

Mr Matas has received numerous awards and honors, including the Manitoba Bar Association Distinguished Service Award in 2008, the Order of Canada in 2009, the Canadian Bar Association National Citizenship and Immigration Section Achievement Award in 2009, and the International Society for Human Rights Swiss Section Human Rights Prize in 2010.

In 2006, Mr Matas co-authored Bloody Harvest: Organ Harvesting of Falun Gong Practitioners in China alongside Hon. David Kilgour. Both Mr Matas and Mr Kilgour were nominated for the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize for this work.

David Matas is a co-author of the 2016 investigative report An Update to Bloody Harvest and The Slaughter. The report meticulously examines the transplant programs of hundreds of hospitals in China, drawing on media reports, official propaganda, medical journals, hospital websites and a vast amount of deleted websites found in archives.

His other works include Why Did You Do That? The Autobiography of a Human Rights Advocate; Justice Delayed: Nazi War Criminals in Canada with Susan Charendoff; Closing the Doors: The Failure of Refugee Protection with Ilana Simon; No More: The Battle Against Human Rights Violations; Bloody Words: Hate and Free Speech; and Aftershock: Antisemitism and Anti-Zionism.

David gave the CAVE Public Lecture on 23 November 2016, entitled "Policy and Law for Australia to Prevent Complicity in Foreign Transplant Abuse".

Robert Bernasconi (Pennsylvania State) - CAVE Distinguished Visitor 2016

CAVE Visitor Robert BernasconiRobert Bernasconi is Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of Philosophy and African American Studies at Pennsylvania State University. He is a co-editor of the journal Critical Philosophy of Race. Much of his recent work has been in the critical philosophy of race: he has written extensively on the racism of philosophers and on the history of the concept of race, but he also addresses current issues, such as police violence and the way race is perpetuated through its spatialisation. In addition he is a specialist on Hegel and continental philosophy more generally and he has written two books on Heidegger and one on Sartre. Among his current projects is a genealogy of the concept of racism. He is also engaged in a study of the ways in which most of those we consider the major philosophers of the eighteenth century addressed - or failed to address - the issues raised by the slave trade with a special concern for the implications of this knowledge for how the history of philosophy and ethics should be taught.

Robert is the CAVE Distinguished Visitor in November 2016.

Ron Mallon (Washington Uni in St. Louis) - CAVE Visitor 2016

CAVE Visitor Ron MallonRon Mallon is a Professor of Philosophy at Washington University in St. Louis.  His work engages experimental philosophy, moral psychology, social ontology, and the philosophy of race, and his work has appeared in a wide range of venues including Cognition, Mind, Mind and Language, Nous, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, and Philosophical Studies.  His book, The Construction of Human Kinds, is just out from OUP.

Prof. Mallon was a keynote speaker at CAVE workshop on the history and philosophy of race in November 2016.

Dominik Düber (Münster) - CAVE Visitor 2016

CAVE Visitor DüberDominik Düber completed his PhD in Philosophy at the University of Münster in Germany in 2014, entitled "Self-determination and the good life in a democratic state: the paternalism argument against perfectionism." Since 2011, he has been a research fellow at the Centre for Advanced Study in Bioethics at the University of Münster. He is currently working on a postdoctoral project on the division of labour.

Dominik visited CAVE in October and November 2016, and gave a seminar in October.

Carolyn Mason (Canterbury) - CAVE Visitor 2016

CAVE Visitor Carolyn MasonCarolyn Mason is a lecturer at the University of Canterbury. Her current research interests are in reasons for action and rationality, research ethics and bioethics, particularly in issues associated with artificial reproductive technologies, and the philosophy of relationships. In her role as an ethicist for the New Zealand Ethics Committee for Artificial Reproduction Technology (ECART), she has suggested changes to New Zealand's regulation on importation of gametes and embryos. She teaches bioethics, ethics, political philosophy, and legal ethics.

Carolyn visited CAVE in September and October of 2016.

Rebecca Brown (Aberdeen) - CAVE Visitor 2016

CAVE Visitor Rebecca Brown (Aberdeen)Becky is a research fellow in applied philosophy at the University of Aberdeen. She works in the Health Services Research Unit, contributing philosophical and ethical analysis to the assessment of different areas of healthcare provision and policy. Becky’s main interests lie within public health ethics and efforts to promote health by encouraging healthy lifestyles. Such activities raise questions about the legitimate extent of state interference in people’s lives in order to promote health. This work draws upon understandings of human psychology and behaviour change in order to understand the nature and role of choice, decision-making, preferences, responsibility, autonomy, behaviour, and so on, when considering the ethical impact of health promotion interventions.

Becky spoke at the CAVE workshop, Recognising those without capacity, in September 2016.

Vikki Entwistle (Aberdeen) - CAVE Visitor 2016

CAVE Visitor Vikki Entwistle (Aberdeen)Vikki Entwistle re-joined the Health Services Research Unit in 2013 as Professor of Health Services Research and Ethics. Vikki started her academic career in health services research as a research fellow at the NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination at the University of York (1994-1998). She then joined the Unit on a Leverhulme Trust Fellowship relating to patients’ participation in treatment decision-making. Vikki spent 2003-2004 as a Harkness Fellow at Harvard School of Public Health developing work on patients’ contributions to healthcare safety. She worked in the Unit, as Senior Research Fellow then Reader, until September 2005 when she moved to the Social Dimensions of Health Institute at the Universities of Dundee and St Andrews as part of the Alliance for Self Care Research. She was promoted in 2007 to Professor of Values in Healthcare.

Vikki has served on various research/policy committees. She was Editor of Health Expectations from 2007-2010and co-chair of the World Congress of the International Network on Feminist Approaches to Bioethics in 2016.

Vikki spoke at the CAVE workshop, Recognising those without capacity, in September 2016.

Anna Smajdor (Oslo) - CAVE Visitor 2016

CAVE Visitor Anna Smajdor (Oslo)Anna is Associate Professor of Practical Philosophy at the University of Oslo. Prior to that, she was Ethics Lecturer at Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia. Anna’s research interests incorporate a range of bioethical themes. She has worked extensively on the ethics of new reproductive technologies, and has published widely on medical and research ethics. She is interested in questions concerning the relationship between nature and morality, especially in the context of medicine, scientific research and innovation.

Anna spoke at the CAVE workshop, Recognising those without capacity, in September 2016.

Shane O'Neill (Queen's University Belfast) - CAVE Visitor 2016

CAVE Visitor Shane O'Neill  Shane O’Neill is Professor of Political Theory at Queen’s University Belfast. He has published extensively on a broad range of topics in critical social theory and contemporary political philosophy. His recent books include the co-edited volumes: After the Nation? Critical Reflections on Nationalism and Post-Nationalism (2010, with Keith Breen); and Recognition Theory as Social Research: Investigating the Dynamics of Social Conflict (2012, with Nick Smith). He is currently working on a critical theory of global justice as decolonization.

Prof. O'Neill visited CAVE in August 2016 and gave a seminar on global justice.

Cecilia M. Heyes (Oxford) - CAVE Visitor 2016

CAVE Visitor Cecilia HeyesCecilia Heyes' work concerns the evolution of cognition. It explores the ways in which natural selection, learning, developmental, and cultural processes combine to produce the mature cognitive abilities found in adult humans. She is especially interested in social cognition. Most of her current projects examine the possibility that the neurocognitive mechanisms enabling cultural inheritance - social learning, imitation, mirror neurons, mind reading, etc - are themselves produces of cultural evolution.

Prof. Heyes visited CAVE in August 2016 as the keynote speaker at the workshop on Social Cognition and Cultural Evolution.

Sally Haslanger (MIT) - CAVE Distinguished Visitor 2016

CAVE Visitor Sally HaslangerSally Haslanger is the Ford Professor of Philosophy in the Department of Linguistics and Philosophy at MIT, and an affiliate in the MIT Women's and Gender Studies Program. She is interested in metaphysics, epistemology, social and political philosophy, feminist theory, and critical race theory. Her recent work has been on social practices, social structures, structural explanation, and topics in feminist epistemology. Her book Resisting Reality: Social Construction and Social Critique (Oxford 2012) won the Joseph B. Gittler award for work in the philosophy of social science. Her current projects focus on ideology as a constituent of social practices, and link ideology with contemporary work in epistemology, philosophy of language, and philosophy of mind. She co-edits the Symposia on Gender, Race and Philosophy, and convenes the Workshop on Gender and Philosophy (WOGAP), and the Women in Philosophy Task Force (WPHTF). She served as Director of the Women's and Gender Studies Program at MIT from 2009-2013.

Haslanger will be one of CAVE's 2016 Distinguished Visitors in July, and will be a keynote speaker at the jointly hosted (with University of Sydney) workshop, Social Imaginaries: Dominance and Resistance, to be held on 22 July 2016.

Robert Audi (Notre Dame) - CAVE Seminar Speaker 2016

CAVE Visitor Robert AudiRobert Audi is John A. O'Brien Professor of Philosophy at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, and Professorial Fellow at Australian Catholic University. His major work focused on epistemology, ethics (especially ethical intuitionism), political philosophy, religious epistemology and the philosophy of mind and action. Some of his recent books include: Moral Perception (Princeton UP, 2013); Democratic Authority and the Separation of Church and State (Oxford UP, 2011); Rationality and Religious Commitment (Oxford UP, 2011); Epistemology: A Contemporary Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge (Routledge, 3rd ed, 2010); Business Ethics and Ethical Business (Oxford UP, 2009); Moral Value and Human Diversity (Oxford UP, 2007); and The Good in the Right: A Theory of Intuition and Intrinsic Value (Princeton UP, 2004). Prof Audi has served as president of the American Philosophical Association (Central Division, 1987-1988) and is general editor of The Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy (3rd edition, 2015).

Robert gave a CAVE seminar on 26 May 2016 on intellectual virtue, justification, and knowledge.

Natalie Stoljar (McGill) - CAVE Visitor 2016

CAVE Visitor, Natalie StoljarNatalie Stoljar is Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy, and Associate Member in the Institute for Health and Social Policy, McGill University. Her  research is in three areas: feminist philosophy, social and political philosophy (especially moral psychology), and the philosophy of law. In feminist philosophy, she has written on feminist metaphysics, including the notions of essentialism, realism and nominalism. In social and political philosophy, her work focuses on autonomy and other aspects of moral psychology. She is co-editor (with Catriona Mackenzie) of the 2000 collection Relational Autonomy. Feminist Perspectives on Autonomy, Agency and the Social Self (OUP).  In the philosophy of law, she has published on the notions of legal interpretation, constitutional interpretation and judicial review, and the methodology of law. Recent articles include  '"Living Constantly at Tiptoe Stance:" Social Scripts, Psychological Freedom and Autonomy.' In M. Oshana (ed.), Personal Autonomy and Social Oppression. Philosophical Perspectives (Routledge, Forthcoming 2014);   'Autonomy and Adaptive Preference Formation.' In M. Piper and A. Veltman (eds) Autonomy, Oppression and Gender (Oxford University Press, 2014); and  'What Do We Want Law to Be? Philosophical Analysis and the Concept of Law.' In W. Waluchow and S. Sciaraffa (eds), Philosophical Foundations of The Nature of Law (Oxford University Press, 2013). Natalie completed her undergraduate work in Philosophy and Law at the University of Sydney and her PhD in Philosophy at Princeton University. She held positions at the ANU, Monash and the University of Melbourne before taking up her current position at McGill.

Natalie will speak at the CAVE Workshop, Legal Processes and Human Rights, in April 2016.

David Bilchitz (Johannesburg) - CAVE Workshop Speaker 2016

CAVE Speaker David Bilchitz (Johannesburg)David Bilchitz is a Professor of Fundamental Rights and Constitutional Law at the University of Johannesburg and Director of the South African Institute for Advanced Constitutional, Public, Human Rights and International Law (SAIFAC). He is also Secretary-General of the International Association of Constitutional Law until 2018. He was elected to the South African Young Academy of Science in 2015. David has a BA (Hons) LLB cum laude from Wits University. He graduated with an MPhil in Philosophy from St John's College, University of Cambridge in 2001 and with a PhD in law from the same university in 2004.

David worked as law clerk to Deputy Judge-President (then) Langa of the South African Constitutional Court in 2000. His book on ‘Poverty and Fundamental Rights: the Justification and Enforcement of Socio-Economic Rights’ was published by Oxford University Press in February 2007. He also has two co-edited books, one of which - titled ‘Human Rights Obligations for Business: Beyond the Corporate Responsibility to Respect?’ - was published by Cambridge University Press and launched at the United Nations library. He publishes extensively with twelve book chapters, and 33 journal articles. He is also on the editorial boards of several prestigious journals.

David’s academic work focuses on the critical role that law plays in protecting the vulnerable within constitutional democracies. His focus is on the field of fundamental rights and, in particular, the content of socio-economic rights, the obligations of business in relation to fundamental rights, the tension between religious freedom and equality, and the rights of animals.

David will be a speaker at the CAVE Workshop, Legal Processes and Human Rights, in April 2016.

Michael Brady (Glasgow) - CAVE Seminar Speaker 2016

CAVE/VOS speaker Michael BradyMichael Brady is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Glasgow. His research focuses on issues in the philosophy of emotion, ethics, and epistemology. His monograph on these themes - Emotional Insight - was published by Oxford University Press in 2013. He is currently co-Principal Investigator on a major three-year research project, titled The Value of Suffering, which is funded by the John Templeton Foundation and hosted in the Philosophy Department, University of Glasgow. He was previously Director of the British Philosophical Association and Secretary of the Scots Philosophical Association. He is on the editorial board of The Philosophical Quarterly and Oxford Bibliographies, and has worked as a philosophical advisor on a number of productions by the Manchester-based theatre company Quarantine.

Michael gave a CAVE seminar on 12 April 2016, entitled "Painfulness, Desires, and Reasons."

Albert Newen (Bochum) - CAVE Visitor 2016

CAVE Visitor Albert Newen (Bochum)Albert Newen is full professor for philosophy of mind at Ruhr-University Bochum. He is director of the Center for Mind, Brain and Cognitive Evolution. He has mainly published on self-consciousness, agency and understanding others and in the recent years on the philosophy of emotion and perception.

Albert will be visiting CAVE in March 2016. He will give a seminar on 15 March, and will be the keynote speaker at the CAVE workshop, "Social Cognition and the Self."

Katsunori Miyahara (Rikkyo) - CAVE Visitor 2016

CAVE Visitor Katsunori Miyahara. Image by Nerissa EscanlarKatsunori Miyahara is a JSPS Research Fellow at Rikkyo University, Tokyo. He received his PhD from the University of Tokyo for his thesis, Phenomenology of Enaction, which explored enactive perception from a phenomenological perspective. He has several publications, including the article "Seeing other agents: Passive experience for seeing the other body as the other's body," which won the Phenomenological Association of Japan Article Prize (2015).

Nicole Vincent (Georgia State) - CAVE Visitor 2016

CAVE Visitor Nicole VincentNicole Vincent works on issues of responsibility in the fields of neuroethics, neurolaw, ethics, philosophy of tort and criminal law, and political philosophy. Her approach is analytic and empirically-informed, and she explores conceptual, normative, metaphysical, and practical problems. She received her PhD in 2007 from the University of Adelaide, and since then she has worked at the Technische Universiteit Delft, at Macquarie University, and in 2013, joined the Department of Philosophy at Georgia State University. She is currently working on a book with Dr. Emma A. Jane, entitled Outsmarted, which is funded by The Enhancing Life Project.

Nicole visited CAVE in February and March of 2016 as a researcher for the Australian Neurolaw Database.

David Bain (Glasgow) - CAVE/VOS Conference Speaker 2016

CAVE/VOS speaker David BainDavid Bain is a philosopher of mind at the University of Glasgow.  He previously taught at Oxford, Bristol, and Nottingham universities.  He was joint Principal Investigator of the Pain Project (2012-13) and is joint PI of the Value of Suffering project (2013-16).  He has published on pain, affect, colour, and Wittgenstein’s private language argument.  Currently, he is working on the relationships among pain, evaluation, consciousness, self-consciousness, and representation.

The Value of Suffering Project and CAVE co-hosted a conference on The Feeling of Suffering. More info can be found on our Events page.

Brock Bastian (UNSW) - CAVE/VOS Conference Speaker 2016

CAVE/VOS speaker Brock BastianBrock Bastian received his PhD in social psychology from The University of Melbourne in 2007. He was awarded a University of Queensland postdoctoral fellowship followed by an Australian Research Council postdoctoral fellowship for his work on dehumanization and morality. In 2014 Dr Bastian received ARC Future Fellowship and also joined the University of New South Wales. His research broadly focuses on pain, happiness, and morality, for which he has received numerous awards and media attention.

The Value of Suffering Project and CAVE co-hosted a conference on The Feeling of Suffering. More info can be found on our Events page.

Michael Brady (Glasgow) - CAVE/VOS Conference Speaker 2016

CAVE/VOS speaker Michael BradyMichael Brady is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Glasgow. His research focuses on issues in the philosophy of emotion, ethics, and epistemology. His monograph on these themes - Emotional Insight - was published by Oxford University Press in 2013. He is currently co-Principal Investigator on a major three-year research project, titled The Value of Suffering, which is funded by the John Templeton Foundation and hosted in the Philosophy Department, University of Glasgow. He was previously Director of the British Philosophical Association and Secretary of the Scots Philosophical Association. He is on the editorial board of The Philosophical Quarterly and Oxford Bibliographies, and has worked as a philosophical advisor on a number of productions by the Manchester-based theatre company Quarantine.

The Value of Suffering Project and CAVE co-hosted a conference on The Feeling of Suffering. More info can be found on our Events page.

Jennifer Corns (Glasgow) - CAVE/VOS Conference Speaker 2016

CAVE/VOS speaker Jennifer CornsJennifer Corns is the postdoctoral researcher of an interdisciplinary, international research project along with Principal Investigators Michael Brady and David Bain, and PhD student Abraham Sapien Cordoba: The Value of Suffering: An Interdisciplinary Investigation of the Nature, Meaning, and Role of Affective Experiences. Her research interests centre on pain and other affective experiences: what they are, how they are related to other things, and why they matter. Her other research interests include philosophy of mind and cognitive science, ethics, philosophy of language, and philosophy of science.

The Value of Suffering Project and CAVE co-hosted a conference on The Feeling of Suffering. More info can be found on our Events page.

Laura Ferris (Queensland) - CAVE/VOS Conference Speaker 2016

CAVE/VOS speaker Laura FerrisLaura Ferris is a PhD and Master of Clinical Psychology candidate at the School of Psychology, University of Queensland. Laura’s research looks at the social psychology of pain, with a focus on the psychosocial outcomes of painful and aversive experiences; the implications of seeing others' suffering; social pain and how it interconnects conceptually with notions of physical pain; and collective painful events and rituals in the field. Laura has a background in law and justice policy, and worked for several years in policy analysis for the Queensland Government within the Department of the Premier and Cabinet. She is also a provisionally registered psychologist.

The Value of Suffering Project and CAVE co-hosted a conference on The Feeling of Suffering. More info can be found on our Events page.

Cindy Harmon-Jones (UNSW) - CAVE/VOS Conference Speaker 2016

CAVE/VOS speaker Cindy Harmon-JonesCindy is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of New South Wales. She studies emotions and motivation, in particular determination, sadness, desire, pride, and anger. Much of her research focuses on a new, functional model for the motivation behind cognitive dissonance. She's currently examining the effects of pain and physical discomfort on moods and emotion, specifically how mild physical pain may alleviate depression and loneliness and increase psychological well-being.

The Value of Suffering Project and CAVE co-hosted a conference on The Feeling of Suffering. More info can be found on our Events page.

Julia Hush (Macquarie) - CAVE/VOS Conference Speaker 2016

CAVE/VOS speaker Julia HushJulia Hush is an Associate Professor in Physiotherapy and Department Director of Research and HDR in Macquarie University’s Department of Health Professions. Her career features a synergistic combination of basic science research in cell biology (1986-1996) with clinical physiotherapy training and practice (1996-2006) and applied clinical research (2005-present). Her clinical expertise lies in the management of persisting pain. Her primary research interest is to understand the multifactorial mechanisms involved in the development of chronic pain, with the aim of advancing the prevention of persisting pain. Her particular interest is in spinal pain, and has published research on prognosis, epidemiology, outcomes, sleep, and pain neuroscience in this field. She previously held appointments at The University of Sydney in the Discipline of Physiotherapy (2005-2012) and Visiting Professor at Stanford University in Professor Sean Mackey’s Systems Neuroscience and Pain Lab (2008, 2013). Julia continues her collaborative pain neuroscience research with Sean Mackey at Stanford University. She has published over 60 peer-reviewed papers and has an h-index of 23.

The Value of Suffering Project and CAVE co-hosted a conference on The Feeling of Suffering. More info can be found on our Events page.

Jolanda Jetten (Queensland) - CAVE/VOS Conference Speaker 2016

CAVE/VOS speaker Jolanda JettenJolanda Jetten is Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Queensland (PhD from the University of Amsterdam in 1997). She is currently employed as an ARC Future Fellowship. Her research is concerned with group processes, social identity and intergroup relations. She has published over 120 peer-reviewed articles, over 35 chapters and 3 books (h index of 45, Google scholar). Jolanda is the former co-Chief Editor of the British Journal of Social Psychology (2009-2013). She has served as an Associate Editor for the British Journal of Social Psychology, and for Social Psychology and is currently an associate editor with Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology. She is an Editorial Consultant for 6 international journals. She was awarded the British Psychological Society Spearman Medal in 2004 and the Kurt Lewin Medal from the European Association of Social Psychology in 2014. Jolanda is the former President of the Society of Australasian Social Psychology (SASP) has served on the ARC College of Experts and recently became a fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia.

The Value of Suffering Project and CAVE co-hosted a conference on The Feeling of Suffering. More info can be found on our Events page.

Lorimer Moseley (South Australia) - CAVE/VOS Conference Speaker 2016

CAVE/VOS speaker Lorimer MoseleyLorimer is Professor of Clinical Neurosciences at the University of South Australia and Senior Principal Research Fellow at Neuroscience Research Australia. He leads the Body in Mind research group, which investigates the role of the brain and mind in chronic pain, undertaking both fundamental behavioural and neurophysiological experiments, and randomized controlled trials and prognostic studies. Lorimer has written 220 papers and several books. He has won Australia’s most prestigious prize for Innovation and Potential Transformation in a Medical or Health related project, was runner-up in the Australian Science Minister’s Prize for Life Sciences and was the inaugural winner of the International Association for the Study of Pain’s Prize for Outstanding Clinical Science in a Pain-related field. He has editorial roles with PAIN, the Journal of Pain, the European Journal of Pain and the British Journal of Sports Medicine. He is Chief Editor of bodyinmind.org, the most influential web and social media presence in the clinical pain sciences.

The Value of Suffering Project and CAVE co-hosted a conference on The Feeling of Suffering. More info can be found on our Events page.

Luke Russell (Sydney) - CAVE/VOS Conference Speaker 2016

CAVE Visitor Luke RussellLuke Russell is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Sydney. Luke's main area of research is moral philosophy, and he has written on evil, forgiveness, virtue and vice. Luke teaches ethics, moral psychology, and critical thinking, in addition to running the University's high school philosophy course Mind and Morality.

The Value of Suffering Project and CAVE co-hosted a conference on The Feeling of Suffering. More info can be found on our Events page.

Amalia Amaya (National Autonomous University of Mexico) - CAVE Visitor 2016

CAVE Visitor 2015, Amalia AmayaAmalia Amaya is Research Fellow at the Institute for Philosophical Research at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. She holds an LLM and a PhD from the European University Institute and an LLM and a SJD from Harvard Law School. She works primarily in philosophy of law, with a particular focus on the epistemology of legal proof, the theory of legal reasoning, and judicial ethics. Some recent publications include: "Exemplarism and Judicial Virtue" (Journal of Law and Literature, 2013), "Coherence, Evidence and Legal Proof" (Legal Theory, 2013) as well as two books Law, Virtue, and Justice (co-edited with Ho Hock Lai) (Hart Publishing, 2012) and The Tapestry of Reason: An Inquiry into the Nature of Coherence and its Role in Legal Argument (Hart Publishing, 2015).

Dr. Amaya visited CAVE in February 2016 as the keynote speaker at the CAVE Workshop, "The Role of Coherence in Legal and Moral Philosophy".

Heidi Maibom (Cincinnati) - CAVE Visitor 2015

CAVE Visitor Heidi MaibomHeidi Maibom is professor of philosophy at the University of Cincinnati. She works on philosophy interpersonal understanding, empathy, mental disorder, responsibility, and moral psychology. She is currently writing a book about perspective taking. She was educated at the University of Copenhagen (CandPhil) and University College London (PhD), and has held fellowships at Cambridge and Princeton Universities.

Heidi gave a CAVE seminar in October, and she was the keynote speaker at the Perspectives on Empathy conference in November 2015.

Luke Russell (Sydney) - CAVE Seminar Speaker 2015

CAVE Visitor Luke RussellLuke Russell is a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Sydney. He researches various topics in moral philosophy, including virtue, vice, evil, and forgiveness. Luke's book "Evil: A Philosophical Investigation" was published in 2014 by Oxford University Press.

Luke gave a joint CAVE/Philosophy Department Seminar on 3 November, 2015, entitled "Forgiving Under Ignorance."

Rachel Ankeny (University of Adelaide) - CAVE Visitor 2015

CAVE Visitor Rachel AnkenyProfessor Rachel Ankeny is an interdisciplinary teacher and scholar whose areas of expertise cross three fields: history/philosophy of science, bioethics and science policy, and food studies. She is an honorary senior fellow at the University of Exeter and a visiting faculty member at Arizona State University. In the history and philosophy of science, her research focuses on the roles of models and case-based reasoning in science, model organisms, the philosophy of medicine, and the history of contemporary life sciences. Her research in bioethics examines ethical and policy issues in genetics, reproduction, women's health, transplantation, and embryo and stem cell research, among other topics. She also has expertise and ongoing research on health and science policy, particularly regarding public engagement. In food studies, Rachel's research interests include food ethics, food habits of women and children, food habits in the Italian diaspora, and the relationship of science to food habits.

Prof. Ankeny spoke at the CAVE conference, Defining the Boundaries of Disease, in October 2015.

Jenny Doust (Bond University) - CAVE Visitor 2015

CAVE Visitor Jenny DoustSince graduating as a medical practitioner in 1993, Professor Jenny Doust has forged a high profile career combining her academic interests in evidence-based medicine, healthcare decision making and general practice. In addition to lecturing in subjects relevant to evidence-based care and general practice, Dr. Doust has conducted extensive research into a wide range of diagnostic related issues and has received numerous grants through NHMRC and other institutes.

Dr. Doust spoke at the CAVE conference, Defining the Boundaries of Disease, in October 2015.

Paul E. Griffiths (University of Sydney) - CAVE Visitor 2015

CAVE Visitor Paul E. GriffithsA philosopher of science with a focus on biology and psychology, Paul was educated at Cambridge and the Australian National University, receiving his PhD in 1989. He taught at Otago University in New Zealand and was later Director of the Unit for History and Philosophy of Science at the the University of Sydney, before taking up a Professorship in the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Pittsburgh. He returned to Australia in 2004, first as an Australian Research Council Federation Fellow and from 2007 as University Professorial Research Fellow at the University of Sydney. At present he is also Academic Associate Director for Humanities and Social Sciences at the Charles Perkins Centre, a major new initiative at Sydney focused on interdisciplinary research into obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Prof. Griffiths spoke at the CAVE conference, Defining the Boundaries of Disease, in October 2015.

John Matthewson (Massey University) - CAVE Visitor 2015

CAVE Visitor MatthewsonJohn is a lecturer at Massey University in Auckland, New Zealand, and has recently been working with Paul Griffits as a research associate at the University of Sydney. He has a background in clinical medicine and completed a PhD in philosophy at the Australian National University in 2012. John's research focuses on the role of evolutionary theory in medicine, as well as representation and explanation in the biological sciences more generally.

Dr. Matthewson spoke at the CAVE conference, Defining the Boundaries of Disease, in October 2015.

Lynette Reid (Dalhousie University) - CAVE Visitor 2015

CAVE Visitor ReidReid's work centres on normative accounts of social justice as the context for understanding and analysing the ethical responsibilities of medicine in specific areas, such as wait list management, professionalism, and the duty to care in public health. Social epistemology (Wittgensteinian, feminist) informs her research on the definition of death.

Prof. Reid spoke at the CAVE conference, Defining the Boundaries of Disease, in October 2015.

Thomas Schramme (University of Hamburg) - CAVE Visitor 2015

CAVE Visitor SchrammeThomas Schramme is Professor in the Department of Philosophy of University of Hamburg, Germany. Dr. Schramme has nearly 2 decades of teaching and research experience in the field of philosophy of medicine. He has held several fellowships and holds Editorial Board memberships in a number of prestigious journals. Dr. Schramme has to his credit a large number of publications on philosophy of medicine and bioethics.

Prof. Schramme spoke at the CAVE conference, Defining the Boundaries of Disease, in October 2015.

Jennifer Radden (University of Massachusetts Boston) - CAVE Visitor 2015

CAVE Visitor, Jennifer Radden

Jennifer Radden is a Professor of Philosophy emerita at the University of Massachusetts Boston. She received degrees in philosophy and psychology at Melbourne University, and holds a doctorate from Oxford. She has published extensively on mental health concepts, the history of medicine, and ethical and policy aspects of psychiatric theory and practice. Her books include Madness and Reason (1986), Divided Minds and Successive Selves: Ethical Issues in Disorders of Identity and Personality (1996), Moody Minds Distempered: Essays on Melancholy and Depression (2009), and The Virtuous Psychiatrist: Character Ethics in Psychiatric Practice, co-authored with Dr John Sadler (2010), and On Delusion (2011), as well as two collections of which she was editor, The Nature of Melancholy (2000) and Oxford Companion to the Philosophy of Psychiatry (2004). Her current book project, under contract with Oxford University Press, is Melancholy Habits: Burton's Anatomy for the Mind Sciences.

Prof. Radden visited CAVE in October 2015, and gave a CAVE seminar on folly

Gillian Triggs (Australian Human Rights Commission) - CAVE Public Lecture 2015

CAVE Public Lecture 2015, Prof. Gillian TriggsEmeritus Professor Gillian Triggs is the President of the Australian Human Rights Commission, taking up her appointment in 2012. She was the Dean of the Faculty of Law and Challis Professor of International Law at the University of Sydney from 2007 to 2012, and Director of the British Institute of International and Comparative Law from 2005 to 2007. She is a former Barrister with Seven Wentworth Chambers and a Governor of the College of Law.

Professor Triggs has combined an academic career with international commercial legal practice and worked with governments and international organisations on disputed continental shelf and other territorial claims, World Trade Organisation law and human rights. Her focus at the Commission is on the implementation in Australian law of the human rights treaties to which Australia is a party, and to work with nations in the Asia Pacific region on practical approaches to human rights. 

Professor Triggs' long-standing commitment to legal education builds upon the Commission's efforts to inform Australians, especially children, about their fundamental human rights.

In 2015, Professor Triggs gave the annual CAVE Public Lecture, entitled "The Business of Human Rights", on 17 September 2015.

Massimiliano Cappuccio (UAE University) - CAVE Visitor 2015

CAVE Visitor Max CappuccioMassimiliano (Max) Cappuccio is Assistant Professor in Philosophy of Mind and Cognitive Science, and directs the Interdisciplinary Cog Sci Lab of United Arab Emirates University. He is a member of UAEU Laboratory of Psycholinguistics, run in collaboration with NYU Abu Dhabi, a founding member UAE Society for Robotics and Automation, and a correspondent member of the Neurophilosophy Lab of the State University of Milan. He is currently working on a NRF/UAEU-funded interdisciplinary project at the intersection of embodied cognition and sport psychology, to enhance athletic performance and develop new training methods.

Max Cappuccio visited CAVE in July and August, starting with a presentation at the Australian Association of Philosophy conference from 5 - 9 July 2015.

Dan Zahavi (University of Copenhagen) - CAVE Distinguished Visitor 2015

CAVE Distinguished Visitor 2015, Dan ZahaviDan Zahavi is Professor of Philosophy at University of Copenhagen. Dan Zahavi was born in Copenhagen, Denmark, and initially studied philosophy at the University of Copenhagen. He obtained his PhD in 1994 from the Husserl Archives at the Katholieke Universiteit in Leuven, Belgium, with Rudolf Bernet as his doctoral supervisor. In 1999 he defended his Danish Disputats (Habilitation) at the University of Copenhagen. In 2002, at the age of 34, he became Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Center for Subjectivity Research at the University of Copenhagen.

Zahavi writes on phenomenology (especially the philosophy of Edmund Husserl) and philosophy of mind. In his writings, he has dealt extensively with topics such as self, self-consciousness, intersubjectivity and social cognition. He is co-editor of the journal Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences. Zahavi's work has been translated into more than 20 languages.

Zahavi is one of the keynote speakers at this year's Australasian Association of Philosophy Conference, hosted by the Philosophy Department at Macquarie University. He will then be speaking at the CAVE workshop, Consciousness, Subjectivity, and Self, on Monday 13 July.

Jennifer Windt (Monash University) - CAVE Visitor 2015

CAVE Visitor Jennifer WindtJennifer Windt joined the Philosophy Department at Monash University in March 2015. From 2009-2015, she held a position as assistant lecturer/researcher in the Theoretical Philosophy Group at the Johannes-Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany. During this period, she was also group manager of the MIND Group. Her research focuses on philosophy of mind and philosophy of cognitive science, especially on sleep, dreaming, and its relation to wake states such as mind wandering, imagination, hallucination, and full-body illusions. Aside from her theoretical-conceptual work, she has participated in a number of interdisciplinary collaborations and research projects.  Together with Thomas Metzinger, she edited Open MIND, an open-access collection of cutting-edge research in philosophy of mind, psychology, and cognitive neuroscience. Her book, titled Dreaming, was recently published by MIT Press.

Jennifer visited CAVE as a speaker in the Consciousness, Subjectivity, and Self workshop in July 2015.

Monima Chadha (Monash University) - CAVE Visitor 2015

CAVE Visitor Monima ChadhaMonima teaches Philosophy at Monash University, Australia. Her principal research area is in cross-cultural philosophy of mind, specifically the Classical Indian and Contemporary Western Philosophy of mind.  The aim of this research is to create a cohesively universal philosophical framework to understand these entities and also to enrich each of these traditions by leveraging insights from the other. This work has regularly featured in leading academic journals like Philosophy East and West; Asian Philosophy; Phenomenology and Cognitive Sciences; Consciousness and Cognition, etc.

Monima visited CAVE as a speaker in the Consciousness, Subjectivity, and Self workshop in July 2015.

Carl Craver (Washington University in St Louis) - CAVE/CCD Visitor 2015

CAVE Visitor Carl CraverCarl Craver is a philosopher of neuroscience with side interests in the history and philosophy of biology, general philosophy of science, metaphysics, and moral psychology. His 2007 book, Explaining the Brain, develops a framework for thinking about the norms of scientific explanation in physiological sciences such as neuroscience. He is working (with Shayna Rosenbaum, York University) to study deficits in agency and moral reasoning in people with amnesia. Other research interests include general work on the nature of scientific explanation, the norms of progress for experimental instruments and techniques, and the difference between modeler's and maker's knowledge of the brain.

Prof. Craver will be speaking at the Amnesia and Identity workshop in June, and will be a guest of the CCD and CAVE for the month of June. 

Dominic Murphy (University of Sydney) - CAVE/CCD Visitor 2015

CAVE and CCD Visitor, Prof. Dominic MurphyDominic Murphy is the Director of the Unit for History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Sydney. His main areas of interest are in the philosophy of the cognitive and biological sciences, especially issues in psychiatry and cognitive neuroscience. He has further interests in evolutionary theory, the history and philosophy of biology and medicine, moral psychology, epistemology and bioethics. Dominic's main current project is a book on self-representation. This looks at recent work on the self in the cognitive neurosciences and social psychology and considers the implications of this work for some philosophical ideas about the nature and function of the self and its relation to theories of cognitive architecture. He is also working on delusions, psychopaths and the role of model-building in the inexact sciences.

Prof. Murphy spoke at the Amnesia and Identity workshop in June 2015. 

Philip Gerrans (Adelaide) - CAVE Visitor 2015

CAVE Visitor Philip GerransProf. Philip Gerrans' main research interest is the use of psychological disorder to study the mind. He has written on developmental disorders (autism and Williams syndrome), cognitive neuropsychiatry (The Measure of Madness), and, more recently, on moral psychopathologies (such as psychopathology) and the emotions. Until 2015 he will be researching a project on the relationship between emotional processing and self representation with an emphasis on psychiatric disorders.

Prof. Gerrans will be speaking at the Predictive Coding, Delusions, and Agency Workshop in May.

Jakob Hohwy (Monash) - CAVE Visitor 2015

CAVE Visitor Jakob HohwyJakob Hohwy is Professor of Philosophy at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. He studied in Aarhus, Denmark, obtained his masters from St. Andrews, Scotland, and did his PhD at the Australian National University. Jakob has established the Cognition & Philosophy Lab at Monash University, which conducts empirical experiments and theoretical explorations in consciousness science. His approach is highly interdisciplinary, and he collaborates with neuroscientists, psychologists, and psychiatrists on topics such as computational neuroscience, delusion formation, the neural correlates of consciousness, multisensory integration in autism, and bodily self-awareness. Jakob is Deputy Editor of the journal Neuroscience of Consciousness, and he is the author of The Predictive Mind (OUP, 2013), which seeks to unify many aspects of consciousness under the notion of prediction error minimization.

Prof. Hohwy will be speaking at the Predictive Coding, Delusions, and Agency Workshop in May.

Kristin Andrews (York University) - CAVE Visitor 2015

CAVE Visitor Kristin AndrewsKristin Andrews is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at York University in Canada, where she also helps coordinate the Cognitive Science program and the Toronto Area Animal Cognition Discussion Group. She on the board of directors of the Borneo Orangutan Society Canada, and is author of two books on the philosophy of animal minds. Kristin is currently a Visiting Research Fellow in the department of philosophy at Macquarie University

Kristin spoke at the "Understanding Complex Animal Cognition" workshop on 2 February 2015. She also gave a seminar at the Philosophy Department on February 6, entitled "What does it mean to call a chimpanzee a person?"

Colin Thomson (University of Wollongong) - CAVE Visitor 2014

CAVE Visitor Colin ThomsonColin Thomson, BA, LLB, LLM (Sydney) has held positions at the Faculty of Law, Australian National University (1972-1988), where in 1983 he introduced medicine and law, and the Faculty of Law, University of Wollongong (1991-2002) where he taught postgraduate courses in health law and ethics. He is Professor of Law at the University of Wollongong and Academic Leader for Health Law and Ethics in the Graduate School of Medicine. He also works as a consultant.

He was a member of the Medical Research Ethics Committee (1988-91) of the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) and, from 1998-2002 a member, and from 2006-2009, chair of the Australian Health Ethics Committee (AHEC).

He was a member of the 1996 AHEC organ transplantation working group, chair of AHEC at the issue of Ethical guidelines on organ and tissue donation after death and Organ and tissue donation by living donors and the revised version of the Ethical guidelines on the use of assisted reproductive technology in clinical practice and research (2007) and a member of the NHMRC Working Party on a national protocol on donation after cardiac death (2008-2010).

He has published and spoken, nationally and internationally, on issues in health law and ethics and is a joint author of Good Medical Practice: professionalism, ethics and law, 2010, Cambridge University Press.

Colin was a speaker at the "Problem with Choosing Children's Gender" Workshop in December 2014

Mary Rawlinson (Stony Brook University) - CAVE Visitor 2014

CAVE Visitor, Mary RawlinsonProf. Mary Rawlinson visited CAVE in December, and as part of her stay, she gave a workshop to interested students on writing and editing. Prof. Rawlinson is an experienced philosopher and journal editor, and is currently the editor of the International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics, and the Co-Director of The Irigaray Circle. She is interested in literature and ethics, bioethics, contemporary French philosophy, the critique of rights, global and social justice, and Hegel, and is recognised not only for her academic work but also for her excellence in teaching. She has won the President's Award for Excellence in Teaching and was a nominee for the Carnegie Teacher of the Year Award.

She was also a respondent at the workshop, The problems with choosing children's gender, on 18 December, and gave a seminar entitled "Eating at the Heart of Ethics" on 17 December.

Julian Savulescu (Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics) - Public Lecture 2014

CAVE Visitor Prof. Julian SavulescuJulian Savulescu's areas of research include: the ethics of genetics, especially predictive genetic testing, pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, prenatal testing, behavioural genetics, genetic enhancement, gene therapy; research ethics, especially ethics of embryo research, including embryonic stem cell research; new forms of reproduction, including cloning and assisted reproduction; medical ethics, including end of life decision-making, resource allocation, consent, confidentiality, decision-making involving incompetent people, and other areas; sports ethics; and the analytic philosophical basis of practical ethics. He is currently the Director of the Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, and is the author of many books, including Human Enhancement (2009), and Unfit for the Future: The Need for Moral Enhancement (2012).

Prof. Savulescu visited CAVE to give the annual public lecture in December 2014.

Marina Oshana (University of California, Davis) - CAVE Distinguished Visitor 2014

CAVE Visitor, Prof. Marina OshanaMarina Oshana is Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Davis.  Her research focuses on issues in personal autonomy, responsible agency, and self-identity.  She teaches classes in normative ethics, moral psychology, philosophy of law, and feminism.  At UC Davis, she has devoted her time to mentoring undergraduate women in philosophy.  Her publications include Personal Autonomy in Society (Ashgate, 2006) and The Importance of How We See Ourselves: Self-Identity and Responsible Agency (Rowman and Littlefield, 2010).  Professor Oshana integrates her teaching interests into her research projects. Recent papers, including "Autonomy and the Partial Birth Abortion Act" (Journal of Social Philosophy, Vol. 42, No. 1, Spring 2011, pp. 46-60), "Secondhand (Moral) Responsibility in Law," in Free Will and Moral Responsibility, ed. Ishtiyaque Haji and Justin Caouette (Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013), and "Trust and Autonomous Agency," (Res Philosophica, July 2014) grew out of work done in philosophy of law classes.  Her publications on self-identity developed from seminars on responsible agency and on the self.  Professor Oshana's work has been widely hailed as furthering the dialogue about personal autonomy as a social and relational phenomenon.  Recently, Professor Oshana has been delving more closely into the possibility of autonomy under conditions of oppression.  She is editor of Personal Autonomy and Social Oppression: Philosophical Perspectives, (forthcoming, Routledge 2014).

Prof. Oshana was the CAVE Distinguished Visitor for 2014. During her stay, she was the keynote speaker at the Moral Responsibility: Non-metaphysical approaches conference in November.

Natalie Stoljar (McGill) - CAVE Visitor 2014

CAVE Visitor, Natalie StoljarNatalie Stoljar is Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy, and Associate Member in the Institute for Health and Social Policy, McGill University. Her  research is in three areas: feminist philosophy, social and political philosophy (especially moral psychology), and the philosophy of law. In feminist philosophy, she has written on feminist metaphysics, including the notions of essentialism, realism and nominalism. In social and political philosophy, her work focuses on autonomy and other aspects of moral psychology. She is co-editor (with Catriona Mackenzie) of the 2000 collection Relational Autonomy. Feminist Perspectives on Autonomy, Agency and the Social Self (OUP).  In the philosophy of law, she has published on the notions of legal interpretation, constitutional interpretation and judicial review, and the methodology of law. Recent articles include  '"Living Constantly at Tiptoe Stance:" Social Scripts, Psychological Freedom and Autonomy.' In M. Oshana (ed.), Personal Autonomy and Social Oppression. Philosophical Perspectives (Routledge, Forthcoming 2014);   'Autonomy and Adaptive Preference Formation.' In M. Piper and A. Veltman (eds) Autonomy, Oppression and Gender (Oxford University Press, 2014); and  'What Do We Want Law to Be? Philosophical Analysis and the Concept of Law.' In W. Waluchow and S. Sciaraffa (eds), Philosophical Foundations of The Nature of Law (Oxford University Press, 2013). Natalie completed her undergraduate work in Philosophy and Law at the University of Sydney and her PhD in Philosophy at Princeton University. She held positions at the ANU, Monash and the University of Melbourne before taking up her current position at McGill.

Natalie Stoljar spoke at the Moral Responsibility: Non-metaphysical approaches conference on 20-21 November.

Jules Holroyd (Nottingham) - CAVE Visitor 2014

CAVE Visitor, Jules HolroydJules Holroyd works in moral and political philosophy, moral psychology and feminist philosophy. Her areas of research touch on autonomy (what is relational autonomy? why might one endorse relational conditions for autonomy?); responsibility (metaphysical conditions for responsibility; and more recently, on whether we are properly held responsible for implicit bias); punishment (can state punishment be justified? what is the relationship between punishment and blame? are there distributive preconditions for just state punishment?); desert (what is it and should it have any role in punitive justice (especially if it is rejected in distributive justice?); and blame (what is blame, what ought it to be, when is it justified?).

Jules Holroyd spoke at the Moral Responsibility: Non-metaphysical approaches conference on 20-21 November.

Andrew Moore (University of Otago) - CAVE Visitor 2014

CAVE Visitor, Prof. Andrew MooreAndrew Moore is an Associate Professor in Philosophy at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. His main research work is in normative ethics, including ethical theory (of right and wrong, well-being, etc.) and practical ethics (including bioethics, and ethics and public policy). He also has research interests in philosophy of mind (e.g. intentionality, consciousness, and the relations between these), meta-ethics, political philosophy, and philosophy of philosophical methods. Alongside his core academic work, Andrew has had several appointments as a public philosopher. These include an ongoing appointment to a committee of New Zealand's Health Research Council that monitors conduct of New Zealand-led clinical trials; and a previous appointment as a policy advisor to the most recent four New Zealand Ministers of Health, as Chair from 2001 to 2010 of New Zealand's National Ethics Advisory Committee. Andrew's student work in philosophy was at New Zealand's University of Canterbury (BA, MA), then at Oxford (D.Phil.).

While visiting CAVE in August, Andrew gave two seminars, discussing objective well-being, and the job of ethics' committees.

Robert Frodeman (University of North Texas) - CAVE Visitor 2014

CAVE Visitor Prof. Robert FrodemanRobert Frodeman visited CAVE for a week from 25th July until 2nd August. He spoke at the CAVE Ethics in the Field workshop held on Friday 1st August 2014. He  also participated in various CAVE events during his stay here. There were two reading sessions on the future of philosophy, as well as a meeting with HDR students to discuss their own work. 

Prof. Frodeman (MS Geology, PhD Philosophy) is Professor of Philosophy and former Chair of the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies at the University of North Texas (UNT), where he specializes in environmental philosophy, the philosophy of science and technology policy, and the philosophy of interdisciplinarity. He served as a consultant for the US Geological Survey for eight years, was the 2001-2002 Hennebach Professor of the Humanities at the Colorado School of Mines, and was an ESRC Fellow at Lancaster University in England in the spring of 2005. In addition to more than 80 published articles and $1.8mil in federal grants, Frodeman is the author and/or editor of nine books, including Geo-Logic: Breaking Ground between Philosophy and the Earth Sciences (SUNY, 2003), the Encyclopedia of Environmental Ethics and Philosophy (MacMillan, 2008), and the Oxford Handbook of Interdisciplinarity (OUP, 2010; second edition 2015). Frodeman is the founding Director of the Center for the Study of Interdisciplinarity at UNT. His latest book, Sustainable Knowledge: a theory of interdisciplinarity (Palgrave Pivot) was published in 2014

Emmanuel Renault (Paris, Nanterre) - CAVE Visitor 2014

CAVE Visitor, Prof. Emmanuel RenaultProf. Emmanuel Renault (Paris, Nanterre) visited CAVE from 9th June till 16th June. During his stay, he was involved in two seminars. The first was a discussion group on his work on Hegel and Dewey, in particular, the notions of social self and working self. The second was a research seminar on Marx. 

Emmanuel Renault is Professor of Social and Political Philosophy at Université Paris Ouest Nanterre. He has published extensively on German philosophy, critical theory, as well as social and political philosophy. His latest publications include: Lire Marx (Paris: Puf, 2009, with G. Dumeénil and M. Löwy); Souffrances sociales (Paris: La Découverte, 2008); as editor, Lire les Manuscrits de 1844 (Paris: La Découverte, 2008). Two new monographs by him are forthcoming: Connaître ce qui est. Enquête sur le présentisme hégélien (Vrin, 2014), and Transformer la philosophie. Etudes sur Marx (Puf, 2014).

Fiery Cushman (Brown University) - CAVE Visitor 2014

CAVE Visitor Prof. Fiery CushmanProf. Fiery Cushman from Brown University visited CAVE from 29 May - 31 May 2014. He was the keynote speaker at the annual Agency and Moral Cognition Network Meeting, this year held at Macquarie University and hosted by CAVE. 

He is currently the director of the Moral Psychology Research Lab at the Department of Cognitive, Linguistic and Psychological Sciences at Brown University. Before starting at Brown University, he completed a post-doctoral fellowship at Harvard University.

Prof. Cushman's field of interest is in moral psychology, particularly in the cognitive processes that give rise to moral judgements, and the evolutionary history behind such processes. He has published in multiple journals, and has contributed several book chapters. 

Marcus Düwell (Utrecht University) - CAVE Distinguished Visitor 2013

CAVE Distinguished Visitor 2013, Prof. Dr. Marcus Duewell (Utrecht)Prof. Dr. Marcus Düwell (Utrecht University) visited CAVE as a Distinguished Visitor from the 17th to the 24th of November. He was a main speaker at the CAVE Dignity Conference, held on Thursday 21st November and Friday 22nd November.

Prof. Düwell holds a chair for philosophical ethics at the department of philosophy at Utrecht University. He is the research director of the Ethics Institute of Utrecht University and the director of the Utrecht Research Institute for Philosophy and Religious Studies. His research interests include bioethics (especially ethics of genetics and environmental ethics) and foundational questions of moral and political philosophy and the relation between ethics and aesthetics. He has edited several books, including Bioethics in Cultural Contexts: Reflections on Methods and Finitude (2006), and Evaluating New Technologies: Methodological Problems for the Ethical Assessment of Technological Developments (2009). His published essays include "Philosophical Presuppositions of Practical Ethics" (2009), "Human Dignity and Human Rights" (2010) and "The Foundations of Capability Theory: Comparing Nussbaum and Gewirth" (2013). He is currently working on a collected edition, Cambridge Handbook on Human Dignity (2013), and has several research projects concerning human dignity and human rights.

Elizabeth Ben-Ishai (Washington) - CAVE Visitor 2013

CAVE Visitor Dr. Elizabeth Ben-IshaiDr. Elizabeth Ben-Ishai visited CAVE from the 4th to the 9th of November. She was a speaker at the CAVE Paternalism Workshop, held on Friday 8th November, as well as a discussant at the CAVE Relational Autonomy and Bioethics Workshop, held on Wednesday 6th November. 

Dr. Ben-Ishai is a policy analyst for the Centre for Law and Social Policy in Washington, D.C., in the United States. She has previously worked as an assistant professor in the department of Political Science at Albion College, and as a senior researcher for Public Citizen. She has published a book, released in 2012, called Fostering Autonomy: A Theory of Citizenship, the State, and Social Service Delivery, as well as articles on vulnerability, paternalism, and autonomy. Her research interests include contemporary political theory, feminist political theory, theories of autonomy, citizenship, social welfare policy, and "liberalism and its critics."

Cheshire Calhoun (Arizona State University) - CAVE Distinguished Visitor 2013

CAVE Distinguished Visitor 2013, Prof. Cheshire Calhoun (Arizona State)Professor Cheshire Calhoun (Arizona State University) visited CAVE as a Distinguished Visitor from the 11th to the 18th of October. She was the main speaker at the CAVE Workshop on Meaning in Life (and why it matters), held on Friday 18th October.

Professor Calhoun works in the areas of normative ethics, moral psychology, feminist philosophy, and lesbian and gay studies. Her publications include  Feminism, the Family, and the Politics of the Closet (Oxford, 2000) and two edited collections, What is an Emotion? (coedited with Robert C. Solomon, Oxford, 1984) and Setting the Moral Compass: Essays by Women Philosophers (Oxford, 2004).  Her published essays include articles on forgiveness, integrity, shame, common decency, commitment, and civility in journals including Ethics,  Hypatia, Journal of PhilosophyJournal of Political Philosophy and Philosophy and Public Affairs. She is currently working on a book titled Meaningful Living and a collection of previously published essays to be titled Moral Aims: Getting It Right and Practicing Morality with Others. Calhoun is series editor for Oxford University Press's Studies in Feminist Philosophy, an associate editor for the journal Ethics, and the Ombudsperson for Nondiscrimination for the American Philosophical Association.

Bernadette McSherry (University of Melbourne) - Public Lecture 2013

CAVE Visitor Prof. Bernadette McSherryMelbourne University's Professor Benadette McSherry gave the annual CAVE Public Lecture in October. She spoke on "Legal Capacity, Mental Capacity and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities."

Professor McSherry is the Foundation Director of the Melbourne Social Equity Institute, University of Melbourne, and Adjunct Professor, Faculty of Law, Monash University. She is an Australian Research Council Federation Fellow. She has honours degrees in Arts and Law, Masters of Law from the University of Melbourne, a PhD from York University, Canada, and a Graduate Diploma in Psychology from Monash University. She is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Social Sciences and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Law. Professor McSherry is a legal member of the Mental Health Review Board of Victoria and has acted as a consultant to government on criminal law, sentencing and mental health law issues.

Lisa Libby (Ohio State University) - CAVE Visitor 2013

CAVE Visitor Prof. Lisa LibbyAssociate Professor Lisa Libby, a researcher in the Psychology Department at Ohio State University, visited Macquarie University for ten days in May as a guest of CAVE and CCD. Along with contributing to other forums in these centres, she participated in the CAVE/CCD workshop, Point of View in Memory and Imagery: philosophical and psychological perspectives on perspective, held on 10th and 11th May.

The focus of the work done in Lisa's lab at Ohio State is on the mental processes underlying people's subjective perceptions of the world and of themselves, how these processes relate to cognition, emotion, and behaviour, and how to identify the way subjective perceptions might be manipulated so as to help people achieve goals, maintain emotional well-being, improve decision-making, and foster interpersonal and intergroup harmony. Libby describes her own work as follows:

"The human sense of self is dual-faceted. It involves an experiential awareness of the present moment and a conceptual representation of the self as an entity that persists across time. William James' distinction between the I-self and the me-self exemplifies this notion of the self, and similar models shape the study of the self across diverse traditions of scholarship, from philosophy to neuroscience. The self is a central topic in social psychology, yet research in this tradition has tended to focus on either the experiential or conceptual facet, overlooking the distinction between the two. In my research I apply a dual-faceted understanding of the self to shed new light on the processes by which people represent and understand the social world. Findings also demonstrate how these processes can be harnessed in the service of achieving goals, maintaining well-being, improving decision-making, and fostering interpersonal and intergroup harmony.

My main program of research addresses these broad aims through the study of visual perspective in mental imagery. Additional lines of work extend this dual-faceted understanding of the self to gain insight into the mechanisms by which people understand others and form judgments and attitudes about the social world."

Over the past decade Libby has published a number of articles in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology as well as articles in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, the Journal of Experimental Psychology, Psychological Science and the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Social Cognition.

Vikki Entwistle (Universities of Dundee and St. Andrews) - CAVE Visitor 2012

CAVE Visitor Vikki EntwistleProfessor Entwistle, currently Professor of Values in Health Care and based in the Social Dimensions of Health Institute at the Universities of Dundee and St Andrews in Scotland, arrived in Sydney on 19th November for a two week stay as a guest of CAVE. During her visit she worked with members of Macquarie's INCISIVE group on patient perspectives in evaluating evidence about new surgical procedures. She also presented a seminar on her recent research.

Vikki has a longstanding interest in the contributions that people make, and are encouraged to make, to the quality and safety of their own healthcare. She has been at the forefront of developments in thinking about key issues relating to 'person centred care', including informing people about the effectiveness of interventions and involving individuals in treatment decision-making, in the management of their long term conditions, and in efforts to secure their safety as they use services. Vikki's research draws on approaches and insights from philosophy as well as social science, and is strongly orientated to inform healthcare policy and practice. She has published over 100 academic papers, and from 2007-2010 was Editor of Health Expectations: an international journal of public participation in health care and health policy.

Antony Duff (University of Stirling) - CAVE Distinguished Visitor 2012

CAVE Visitor, Prof. Antony Duff (Stirling)Professor Duff - a professor emeritus in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Stirling in Scotland - visited the Centre from the 11th to 26th July.

Professor Duff is a leading expert on the philosophy of punishment and is internationally recognized for his expertise in criminal law and its structure. He is widely acknowledged as having catalyzed renewed interest in criminal law theory through his major works: Intention, Agency, and Criminal Liability: Philosophy of Action and the Criminal Law (Blackwell, 1990); Criminal Attempts (Oxford, 1996); and Answering for Crime: Responsibility and Liability in the Criminal Law (Hart 2007). He received a Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship (2002-05) for his work on Answering for Crime and also held a British Academy Research Readership (1989-91).

Additional landmark books that have influenced thinking on punishment theory and philosophy include Trials and Punishments (Cambridge, 1986) and Punishment, Communication and Community (Oxford, 2001). He recently led a three-year interdisciplinary study of the criminal trial and with three colleagues produced The Trial on Trial, published by Hart in three volumes (Truth and Due Process, 2004; Judgment and Calling to Account, 2006; Towards a Normative Theory of the Criminal Trial, 2007). The study was funded by the U.K.'s Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), which has also funded a four-year follow-up project on criminalisation that began in 2008.

Professor Duff completed a B.A. in 1967, followed by postgraduate study at Oxford University. He was a visiting lecturer in philosophy at the University of Washington, Seattle, in 1968-69 and joined Stirling's Department of Philosophy in 1970.

At Stirling he taught contemporary and historical moral philosophy, philosophy of action, and philosophy of law to law and philosophy students. He was director of the M.Litt. in legal and political philosophy program, supervised M.Phil. and Ph.D. candidates, and contributed to development of the M.Sc. in criminology and LL.B. programs. He served as head of the Department of Philosophy for three terms.

Professor Duff is founding co-editor of Criminal Law and Philosophy and serves on the editorial boards of Legal Theory and Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law. He is an associate member of the Scottish Consortium on Crime and Criminal Justice and a member of the advisory board of the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, Edinburgh.

He has been an adviser to the Action for Children (formerly NCH) inquiry into the Scottish children's hearing system that originated from the Kilbrandon Report, an adviser to the Scottish Council Foundation project on public interest in criminal and youth justice, and a lecturer on sentencing theory for Judicial Studies Committee refresher courses. He chaired the philosophy sub-panel of the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise of the Higher Education Funding Councils, which fund British universities.

Professor Duff was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1996 and a Fellow of the British Academy in 2004. He received an honorary D.Jur. from the University of Oslo in 2008.

Kirk Ludwig (Indiana University) - CAVE Visitor 2012

CAVE Visitor Prof. Kirk Ludwig (Indiana)Professor Ludwig (Indiana University) visited CAVE as a keynote speaker at the Social Ontology and Collective Intentionality workshop held under the Centre's auspices on the 3rd and 4th May 2012. Professor Ludwig conducts research on foundational issues in the philosophy of language (especially logical form and semantics), epistemology, the philosophy of mind and action, and metaphysics, though his interests extend to every area of philosophical inquiry. He taught at the University of Florida from 1990 to 2010 and was the Colonel Alan R. and Margaret G. Crow CLAS Term Professor from 2008-2010, before joining the philosophy department at Indiana University, Bloomington. He is the editor of the volume on Donald Davidson (2003) in the Cambridge Contemporary Philosophy in Focus series, and he is coauthor with Ernie Lepore (Rutgers) of Donald Davidson: Meaning, Truth, Language and Reality (OUP 2005) and Donald Davidson's Truth-theoretic Semantics (OUP 2007). Recent publications include "Truth and Meaning Redux" (with Ernie Lepore, Philosophical Studies, 2010), "Donald Davidson" (Key Thinkers in the Philosophy of Language, Continuum Press, 2010), "Intuitions and Relativity" (Philosophical Psychology, 2010), "Adverbs of Action and Logical Form" (A Companion to the Philosophy of Action, Wiley, 2009), "Fodor's Challenge to the Classical Computational Theory of Mind" (with Susan Schneider,Mind and Language, 2008), "The Concept of Truth and the Semantics of the Truth Predicate" (with Emil Badici, Inquiry, 2007), "Radical Misinterpretation: A Reply to Stoutland" (with Ernie Lepore, International Journal of Philosophical Studies, 2007), "The Epistemology of Thought Experiments" (Midwest Studies in Philosophy, 2007), "The Argument from Normative Autonomy for Collective Agents" (Journal of Social Philosophy, 2007), "Collective Intentional Behavior from the Standpoint of Semantics" (Noûs, 2007). He is currently working inter alia on a book titled Understanding Collective Action: From Individual to Institutional Agency.

Beate Roessler (University of Amsterdam) - CAVE Visitor 2011

CAVE Visitor, Prof. Beate Roessler (Amsterdam)Professor Roessler visited CAVE for the month of November 2011, where her activities included presenting the main paper at a workshop on autonomy - one of her central interests. She is professor of ethics and its history at the University of Amsterdam, having served as the Socrates Professor for the Foundations of Humanism at Leiden University from 2003 to 2010. Before that she taught philosophy at the Free University in Berlin and at the University of Bremen. She has studied philosophy in Tuebingen, London, Oxford and Berlin, and completed her Ph.D. in 1988 at the Free University Berlin and her Habilitation in 2001 at the University of Bremen. In 2003/4 she was a fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study (Wissenschaftskolleg) in Berlin. She is a co-editor of the European Journal of Philosophy. Since October 2006 she has been program director of the research program "Philosophy and Public Affairs" at the Amsterdam School of Cultural Analysis (ASCA). Her research fields include theories of freedom and autonomy, theories of privacy, moral normativity, and feminist theories. Her current research is concerned with theoretical and practical problems in autonomy.

Her publications include The Value of Privacy (Polity Press, 2005); Handbuch der politischen Philosophie und Sozialphilosophie, edited with Stefan Gosepath and Wilfried Hinsch (de Gruyter, 2008); Von Person zu Person. Zur Moralität persönlicher Beziehungen, edited with Axel Honneth (Suhrkamp, 2008); Privacies: Philosophical Evaluations (edited volume) (Stanford University Press, 2004); Autonomy: Problems and Limits - a special October 2002 issue of Philosophical Explorations, Vol. V, No. 3; "Labour, Recognition, Emancipation", in B.van den Brink and D. Owen (eds), Power and Recognition: Articles on the Theory of Recognition (Cambridge University Press, 2007); "Problems with Autonomy", in Hypatia, Vol 17, No. 4; and "New Ways of Thinking about Privacy", in Anne Phillips, Bonnie Honig and John Dryzek (eds), Oxford Handbook of Political Theory (Oxford University Press, 2006).

Walter-Sinnott-Armstrong (Duke University) - CAVE Distinguished Visitor 2011

CAVE Distinguished Visitor 2011 Prof. Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (Duke)Walter Sinnott-Armstrong was CAVE's Distinguished Visitor for 2011, visiting the Centre for the month of July. Walter is Chauncey Stillman Professor of Practical Ethics in the Philosophy Department and the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University. He publishes widely in normative moral theory, meta-ethics, applied ethics, moral psychology and neuroscience, philosophy of law, epistemology, informal logic, and philosophy of religion. Recently his research has focused primarily on empirical moral psychology and neuroscience. While visiting CAVE he was a keynote speaker at the Centre's Neorolaw Workshop (see Events) and presented a joint Cave/MACCS/Philosophy seminar on the question "Do psychopaths make moral judgements?"

Media interest in Walter's visit led to interviews with ABC Radio, where he spoke about the the moral judgement of psychopaths, and with The Australian, where he discussed the question of lie detection using brain scanning technology. CAVE Advisory Board member David Weisbrot also featured in The Australian's report.

Research Training Award funded by CIHR and the National Collaborating Centres of the Public Health Agency of Canada (NCC-PHAC).

Chris Degeling (University of Calgary) - CAVE Visitor 2011

CAVE Visitor Dr. Chris Degeling (Calgary)Dr Degeling is a social scientist, a practicing veterinarian and a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Calgary, Canada where he is working with Melanie Rock and colleagues on projects that examine how our knowledge of non-human animal health can be used by planners and policy makers to improve the health and wellbeing of human populations.  His passion is to further our understanding of health care practices, and how they are shaped by context, events, processes and meaning.  Much of his work explores changes in the ways that humans value and use animals to meet social, medical and technological needs.  While in Sydney he will be exploring the population-level health effects of pet dog ownership in modern cosmopolitan cites. 

This study is part of an ongoing research program supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CHIR), Alberta Innovates - Health Solutions (AI-HS) and a PHIRNET Population Health Intervention

Thomas Pogge (Yale University) - Public Lecture 2011

CAVE Visitor Prof. Thomas PoggeOn 11 August Professor Thomas Pogge of Yale University inaugurated CAVE's Public Lecture programme with a talk titled "Human Rights as Constraints on Global Constitutional Arrangements." 

He argued that rich countries and their corporations and citizens are violating the human rights of the global poor, to the point where this qualifies as the largest human rights violation in human history. Professor Pogge also outlined some ways in which the ordinary citizens of rich countries can do something to address this state of affairs.

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