News and events

News and events

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    Events

    Research workshops and events

    Binding and reading rapidly-presented letters

    Speaker: Associate Professor Alex Holcombe, Department of Psychology, The University of Sydney

    Date & Time: Wednesday 31 May, 2.00pm - 3.00pm

    Venue: Senate Room, C8A 310

    As you read these words, your eyes hop from left to right. At each point that the eyes alight upon, it is thought that only one or two words can be simultaneously identified. Attentional shifts work in concert with eye movements and determine which words are recognised. However, the effect of attentional shifts on letter and word processing has been difficult to determine. I will describe a paradigm that helps tease apart the contributions of mid-level visual processing, attention shifts, and memory consolidation in recognising two letters. Our results suggest that some processes are invariant whether or not attention shifts from left to right. Very recently, however, we have found some intriguing possible differences in the processing of unattended and attended letters.

    No RSVP required.


    Towards a New Understanding of Object Perception

    Speaker: Professor Mary A. Peterson, University of Arizona, Cognitive Science Program and Department of Psychology

    Date & Time: Thursday 15 June, 10.30am - 12.00pm (revised date)

    Venue: Australian Hearing Hub, Level 3, Seminar Room 3.610

    Visual perception was long understood as a serial feedforward process in which, at a very early stage of processing, borders between regions in the visual input were assigned as bounding contours to the region on one side; this constituted object detection (aka figure assignment). The other region, lacking a shaping contour, was perceived as a locally shapeless ground to the object. On this feedforward view, object memories and semantics were accessed only after object detection occurred and only for objects ("figures"), not for grounds. Research in my laboratory shows that this traditional view is incorrect, and favors the alternative view that before object detection, a fast pass of processing activates multiple possible object hypotheses that could fit both sides of borders. These hypotheses compete for perception at high and low levels of the visual hierarchy. The winner is detected/perceived; the loser is suppressed. In my talk, I will review some history and then summarize five recent experiments consistent with the view that object detection occurs via hierarchical Bayesian inference.

    No RSVP required.


    Please address any questions and requests for further information to Jo Tuck at humansciencesresearch@mq.edu.au

    Public lectures

    Do you see what I see? The new frontier in vision

    • Discover why the way you see objects and faces, and your ability to recognise them, may be different from that of others. 
    • Learn how cognitive neuroscientists are developing tests to precisely measure and compare these visual recognition abilities. 
    • Hear about research that is revealing how your brain processes visual information and how this changes with experience and practice.

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    Sport-related concussions: consequences in the short and long term

    • Gain insights into why concussion amongst athletes is a major health crisis that needs to be addressed by treatment approaches that consider the underlying cause of the concussion.
    • Understand some of the mechanisms that may explain how multiple concussions can lead to progressive cognitive decline, and some of the treatment options that are currently being developed and tested.
    • Find out about a program of treatment delivery that is being implemented in Canada, with the aim of reaching as many sufferers of the enduring symptoms of concussion as possible.
    • Receive some general information on the short and long-term effects of single and multiple concussions

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    Childrearing experts: Who to believe?

    • Gain insights into how you should respond to prolific expert opinions that currently exist about child development.
    • Find out if one size or 'advice' fits all, at all times and in all situations.
    • Learn about different areas, like moral behaviour, and how you can achieve the results you would like for your child.

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    A Day on Drugs: What's the problem and how to reduce it

    • Consider addiction processes from different perspectives to provide a multi-disciplinary understanding of addiction
    • Reassess current therapies and their therapeutic efficacies
    • Help to determine pathways for translating research and to learn how industries can broaden this reach to impact our population.

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