Science & Engineering

Science Macquarie Island                                                     Since 1978 the research of Macquarie University staff, graduate students and Honorary Associates have contributed extensively to understanding the island’s ecosystems, landforms and geomorphic processes

Macquarie Island

Macquarie Island is one of six subantarctic island groups. Since 1978 the research of Macquarie University staff, graduate students and Honorary Associates have contributed extensively to understanding the island’s ecosystems, landforms and geomorphic processes

Science - Cerium Lasers

Cerium lasers

Cerium lasers are unique in that they can produce light that can be tuned across a broad range of wavelengths particularly spanning the UVB part of the ultraviolet spectrum.

The Jim Piper Award for Excellence in Research Leadership (Highly Commended 2013)

Lesley is an ecologist with a longstanding interest in the impacts of climate change on biodiversity. She leads a research team that approaches this challenging issue with a wide variety of techniques.

Early Career Researcher of the Year – Science & Engineering (Highly Commended 2013)

Dr Ross Mackenzie’s main research interest is the impact of trade liberalisation on health, specifically focusing on the global strategies and operations of transnational tobacco corporations

Early Career Researcher of the Year – Science & Engineering (Highly Commended 2013)

David is an early career researcher in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Macquarie University. He is currently a Macquarie University Research Fellow, working on his passion, the late-stage evolution of stars.

Application of thermal science to industrial ecology

Dr Vladimir Strezov designed thermo-analytical techniques for applying the thermal characterisation of materials, monitoring the energy required for their processing and understanding the fundamental properties responsible for pollutant formation at the source.

Building a disease-resilient oyster industry

Australian oysters support a valuable food industry ($73.3 M p/a) and promote healthy estuaries by providing vital ecosystem services. QX disease is economically and environmentally important because it causes mass mortality of Sydney rock oysters.

The ecology of bizarre aquatic microbial slime communities deep beneath the Nullarbor desert

It has traditionally been thought that almost all life on earth ultimately derives its energy from sunlight. However, deep below ground certain microbes can use chemicals to generate energy.