Actuarial Co-op program Structure

Actuarial Co-op program Structure

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The Actuarial Co-op program at Macquarie University is offered through the Bachelor of Actuarial Studies with Professional Practice (Honours).

The professional practice component of the Co-op program provides a practice-based approach to learning in which students integrate their understanding from the workplace with their studies through reflective practices scaffolded throughout the curriculum. This supports their learning before, during and after placement.

What the program offers

Work ready students and graduates - the professional practice component of the program allows students to use classroom learning to improve their workplace performance and vice versa, thereby ensuring that they can add value to your organisation with professional knowledge and skills that are current and relevant

Vocational Placements

Students alternate between classroom studies and workplace experience in the form of vocational placements, one of approximately three months and two placements up to six months over a four-year course. Students develop professional skills and networks and bring their practical experience back to the classroom to further enhance their studies. Students graduate with practical knowledge, strong professional networks and enhanced employability in their chosen field.

The table below gives an overview of the sequencing for vocational placements in the Actuarial Studies Co-op program.

Vocational placements

Professional Practice curriculum

The professional practice component of the program consists of four units taken over the course of the four-year Co-op program .

Year 1st year Session 2 1st year Session 3 3rd year Session 1 3rd year Session 2
BPP Unit Code PROF1001 PACE2001 PACE3001 PACE4099
BPP Unit Name Introduction to Professional Practice Professional Practice Placement 1 Professional Practice Placement 2 Advanced Professional Practice and Reflection Practice Placement 3
Delivery Classroom-based, career identity, professional expectations

In coordination with 3 month placement

In coordination with 6 month placement In coordination with 6 month placement
Credit Points 10 cp 10 cp 30 cp 30 cp

PROF1001

This unit offers  an introduction to professional practice. Students will have opportunities to develop fundamental workplace skills, including communication, teamwork, decision-making, networking and reflective practice. Students will reflect on their personal attributes, values and skills, engage in career planning and goal setting, as well as exploring industries, organisations and/or occupations. The unit is designed to help students begin to develop an understanding of their professional identity and the changing nature of work. The unit will provide a foundation for students to complete a successful practical experience in a workplace as part of their studies. While students admitted to the Bachelor of Professional Practice have enrolment priority for this unit, a limited number of spaces are open to students enrolled in other degrees.

PACE2001

This unit offers an academic foundation for a professional experience in a workplace. Students will further develop their professional communication skills, understanding of professional ethics and application of reflective practice. Students will explore and develop project management skills based on their experience in the workplace, including the use of technology to support project planning and management. While students admitted to the Bachelor of Professional Practice have enrolment priority for this unit, a limited number of spaces are open to students enrolled in other degrees.

PACE3001

This unit provides curriculum support for students to scaffold their learning during an extended vocational placement. Students will further develop their skills in reflective practice and management of their professional self. Students will have opportunities to develop professional skills, such as self-efficacy, creativity and resilience. Themes in the unit include the relationship between theory and practice and elements of active global citizenship. The unit draws on experiences in the workplace, seminars and learning through an online, modularised curriculum.

PROF4099

This placement-based capstone unit provides curriculum support for students to scaffold their learning during an extended vocational placement. Students will develop professional skills, such as problem-solving, leadership and entrepreneurship. Unit themes include workplace cultures, institutional values and reflecting on inter-disciplinary experiences. Drawing on experiences in the workplace, seminars and online modules, the unit is designed to support students’ transitions to the next phase of their career and ongoing learning journey. Students will be encouraged to integrate and reflect on workplace and classroom experiences throughout their degree.

Student activities while on vocational placement at your organisation

The list below provides examples of activities that students might be able to contribute to while on vocational placement at your organisation:

  • Work on insurance benefits, features, and pricing
  • Research around investment options, investment manager choice
  • Claims payments, definitions, and legal requirements
  • Valuation of liabilities for insurance portfolios
  • Research to inform new product design
  • Asset liability modelling
  • Insurance pricing
  • Risk modelling
  • Performance analysis and benchmarking
  • Financial planning
  • Financial modelling of complex transactions
  • Spreadsheet modelling, design and automation
  • Analysis and modelling of capital requirements
  • Audit of financial models

Vocational placements - student knowledge and skills

Students who enter the Co-op program in Actuarial Studies at Macquarie University will have demonstrated a very strong aptitude for academic studies with a minimum ATAR in the top 1.5% and are likely to be in the top 1% of their school cohort. They will also have demonstrated abilities to communicate well, solve problems and work collaboratively both in academic and extracurricular contexts. In addition to enthusiasm for actuarial and statistical work, these students will demonstrate an interest in service and leadership.

By the end of the first year of their degree, students will:

  • have studied units in Advanced Mathematics covering calculus and linear algebra, further developing their ability to solve problems with an analytical approach. Students also study a first year sequence in probability theory and statistical data analysis. These units cover ideas from hypothesis testing, sampling distributions and regression theory as well as developing their confidence in calculating probabilities in a range of complex scenarios
  • have taken a good first step in developing models to analyse risk, and they are beginning to use statistical software such as Minitab and Excel with confidence. In addition to a first year sequence in Macroeconomics and Microeconomics, they complete a first unit in Actuarial Studies where they develop applications of their mathematical, statistical and financial knowledge to problems involving risk and money including superannuation.
  • have begun to prepare for professional practice by exploring and extending fundamental workplace skills, including communication, teamwork, decision-making, networking and reflective practice.  In the summer between first and second year, students undertake their first vocational placement. While completing the placement, students are enrolled in units to support skill development in areas such as professional communication, project management, professional ethics and reflective practice.

By the end of second year, students will have studied:

  • two further units in Probability and Statistics giving students confidence in applying statistical and probabilistic models in practice and are quite rigorous in their structure.
  • advanced units in Mathematics of Finance and Contingent Payments developing students' ability to analyse uncertain future payments in a fairly sophisticated risk-modelling context.
  • electives, which meet the general education type requirements of our Macquarie degrees.

While on vocational placements throughout third year, students:

  • complete units that examine and explore the use of statistical models in the insurance context.
  • develop skills in loss modelling, risk analysis, regression analysis and time series models.
  • complete Co-op units to scaffold their continued development of skills, such as self-efficacy, resilience, entrepreneurship and leadership, while exploring the relationship between theory and practice.

MU PACE Co-op model

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