Skip to Content

Department of Linguistics

LINGLINE 99 March 2016

LINGLINE is the departmental newsletter of the Department of Linguistics at Macquarie University. It focuses on the interests and concerns of staff and postgraduate students in the department. LINGLINE aims to keep staff and students across the world in touch with the department and with one another, and welcomes contributions from all staff and students. Please send submissions to the editor, Haidee Kruger, at haidee.kruger@mq.edu.au. Suggestions for and feedback about the newsletter are welcome.

Inside this edition

Hello again
Staff news

  • A warm welcome to our new staff members
  • Fresh from the printers! Recently published books by staff members

Congratulations
Reports: Conferences, workshops and special events

  • Applied linguistics at JALT 2015 (Shizuoka, Japan, 20-23 November 2015)

Features

  • Celebrating the new Linguistics space in C5A with meaningful art
  • Dr Deanna Wong wins Spoken BNC2014 Early Access Data Grant
  • Linguist in the limelight (1): Dr Joe Blythe
  • PhD student Thushara Gamage visits Sri Lanka
  • Linguist in the limelight (2): Dr Titia Benders

Linguists in the media
Upcoming events
Conference calls and funding opportunities
HDR corner
News from the library
2015 publications and conference presentations by staff and PhD students
 

Hello again

The first edition of LINGLINE celebrates all that is new - with news of new books, new staff members, and the new linguistics space in Building C5A. We have a double dose of Linguist in the Limelight in this edition - and hope to introduce you to many of our new staff members in editions to come.

Remember that LINGLINE now has its own webpage!

- Haidee Kruger

Staff news

A warm welcome to our new staff members

Four new staff members joined the department early in 2016. A warm welcome to all of them!

Dr Joe Blythe is an interactional linguist specialising in Australian indigenous languages. He has held post-doctoral fellowships at the ANU, the MPI Nijmegen and the University of Melbourne. He conducts field research on the Murrinhpatha language of the Northern Territory and on the Gija and Jaru languages from northern Western Australia.

He has conducted research on person reference and place reference, pointing, teasing, other-initiation of repair, and on convergent structuration in Australian languages. He is currently researching the acquisition of kinship terminology by Murrinhpatha-speaking children.

Joe is featured as one of our Linguists in the Limelight for this edition - read on to get to find out more about him! 

Leidy Castro-Meneses has an undergraduate degree in Psychology from Universidad Surcolombiana and will graduate this April with a PhD in Human Cognition and Brain Science from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders (Macquarie University). Her research interests include cognitive and affective neuroscience. During Leidy's PhD she investigated inhibitory control of speech of younger and older adults with magnetoencephalography (MEG) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). She has now started a post-doc with Associate Professor Jan-Louis Kruger, in which they are investigating the use of subtitling as learning support in higher education via the use of electroencephalography (EEG) and other behavioural measures. 

Craig Salmon completed his Master of Clinical Audiology at Macquarie University in 2015 and has recently joined the Speech and Hearing Clinic team as an Intern Audiologist. He holds an undergraduate degree in Audio Engineering with several years of experience working in this field.

Craig has an interest in adult aural rehabilitation as well as clinical education and is looking forward to completing his clinical internship this year.

Dr Nick Wilson is a sociolinguist whose research interests include interactional and variationist strands of sociolinguistics. Nick completed his undergraduate and Masters degrees at the University of Edinburgh. He then went on to complete a PhD at Victoria University of Wellington, on the linguistic construction of leadership and team identity in a New Zealand rugby team. Following this, Nick returned to the UK, teaching first at the University of Manchester, on bilingualism and language contact, then at Cardiff University, where he worked up until coming to Macquarie. At Cardiff, Nick taught on a variety of topics, including sociolinguistics, research methods, discourse analysis and literary stylistics.

Nick's recent and current research includes: communication training with homeless footballers in Wales; sociolinguistic variation of the pre-vocalic definite article; and finding the perfect half-time team talk. He is also co-authoring a new edition of An Introduction to Sociolinguistics with Janet Holmes.

Fresh from the printers!  Recently published books by staff members

Linguistic Diversity and Social Justice: An Introduction to Applied Sociolinguistics (Professor Ingrid Piller)

Oxford University Press has just released Professor Ingrid Piller's new book Linguistic Diversity and Social Justice employs a case-study approach to real-world instances of linguistic injustice.

Linguistic diversity is a universal characteristic of human language but linguistic diversity is rarely neutral; rather it is accompanied by linguistic stratification and linguistic subordination. Domains critical to social justice include employment, education, and community participation. The book offers a detailed examination of the connection between linguistic diversity and inequality in these specific contexts within nation states that are organized as liberal democracies. Inequalities exist not only between individuals and groups within a state but also between states. Therefore, the book also explores the role of linguistic diversity in global injustice with a particular focus on the spread of English as a global language. While much of the analysis in this book focuses on language as a means of exclusion, discrimination and disadvantage, the concluding chapter asks what the content of linguistic justice might be.

Features

  • Prompts thinking about linguistic disadvantage as a form of structural disadvantage that needs to be recognised and taken seriously, and that warrants a serious public debate as to how it can best be mitigated
  • Includes case studies from around the world
  • Offers a conversational approach inviting readers to engage with linguistic diversity and social justice through the online forum Language on the Move

Early reviews

"This is a serious book on a serious subject. In a globalized world whose rhetoric celebrates linguistic diversity, Ingrid Piller shows that the reality is one of systemic inequality and disadvantage-and makes a strong argument that linguistic questions should figure prominently on the social justice agenda in the twenty-first century."

- Deborah Cameron, Professor of Language and Communication, University of Oxford

"A vivid, powerful, and sober analysis of how language serves to entrench injustice and create indefensible discrimination. Piller's wide-ranging book should inspire and shock both the general reader and the research world."

- Robert Phillipson, Professor Emeritus, Copenhagen Business School (Denmark), and author of books on language policy, linguistic imperialism, and language rights

Preview

www.oup.com/academic and enter promotion code AAFLYG6 to receive a 30% discount!

The Routledge Encyclopedia of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics: Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed-Methods Research (Associate Professor Mehdi Riazi)

Associate Professor Mehdi Raizi's new book, The Routledge Encyclopedia of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics, is just out. It provides accessible and concise explanations of key concepts and terms related to research methods in applied linguistics. Encompassing the three research paradigms of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods, this volume is an essential reference for any student or researcher working in this area.

The volume provides:

  • A-Z coverage of 570 key methodological terms from all areas of applied linguistics
  • detailed analysis of each entry that includes an explanation of the head word, visual illustrations, cross-references to other terms, and further references for readers
  • an index of core concepts for quick reference.

Comprehensively covering research method terminology used across all strands of applied linguistics, this encyclopedia is a must-have reference for the applied linguistics community.

Reviewers' comments

"This book is an invaluable resource for applied linguistics researchers, beginning and experienced alike. The book, further, is an extraordinary achievement for a single author, revealing Riazi's strong command and understanding of issues relating to applied linguistics research. I will most certainly be recommending it to my students."

- Brian Paltridge, University of Sydney, Australia

"The Routledge Encyclopedia of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics is an important resource for researchers in this field of study. It provides an up-to-date and comprehensive reference guide to core constructs and covers key concepts in quantitative, qualitative and mixed-method approaches. This volume will serve as a useful tool for both novice and experienced researchers in applied linguistics and related subject areas."

- Jane Jackson, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Congratulations

Staff

The late Emeritus Professor Christopher Candlin was honoured in the Australia Day Honours List. Emeritus Professor Candlin received the award of Officer (AO) in the General Division of the Order of Australia for distinguished service to higher education, particularly in the fields of linguistics and communication research and as an academic, teacher and mentor.

We send our very best wishes to Professor Candlin's family in light of this fitting acknowledgement.

LINGLINE 99 March 2016Chi Lo, a PhD student in the Faculty of Human Sciences studying human communication, and teaching linguistics and speech and hearing sciences, was recognised in the inaugural Tutoring Induction Program Citations for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning. Chi received a TIP Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning for his work on three key learning and teaching areas: theory and application, students as individuals, and fun and fascination. You can read more about Chi's teaching philosophy here. Well done!

LINGLINE 99 March 2016Jean Cho was awarded a FoHS HDR Excellence Award at the Faculty Meeting on 9 December 2015 for her research project Interpreting English as a Global Language in South Korea: Dreams vs. Realities. The award was in the "Research Outputs" category and awarded for Jean's interdisciplinary work about English language ideologies in Korea in relation to the recent phenomenon of "English fever" or yeongeo yeolpung, which refers to the frenzied pursuit of English as valued language capital among Koreans. Specifically, she investigates the question of how the promises of English translate into lived experiences and life course trajectories in the most engaged group of English language learners, namely translators and interpreters.

Jean Cho (middle) receiving an FoHS HDR Excellence Award, with her supervisor, Professor Ingrid Piller (left), and Dr Stephen Moore (right).

Jean's research has so far resulted in three journal articles in top-tier international sociolinguistics journals and a book contract for a monograph based on her thesis with international publishing house Springer.

Jean is the fifth member of the Language on the Move team to receive an FoHS HDR Excellence Award. Previous Language on the Move awardees include Alexandra Grey (2014), Hongyan Yang (2011), Jenny Zhang (2010) and Vera W. Tetteh (2008).

LINGLINE 99 March 2016On a more personal note, last October Dr Liora Ballin and Shai welcomed their baby girl Jazmin Paris to the world. Liora and Shai are loving the adventure and learning lots on the parenthood journey!

Congratulations to Hiranya Anderson on the arrival of her granddaughter, Celeste Mercy Loder (3870gm, and 51cm) born on 20 January 2016.

Congratulations also to Phil Nakad, manager of the audiology clinic, and his wife Jade on the birth of their baby daughter Willow, born on Sunday 31 January 2016.

Left: Liora Ballin with baby Jazmin Paris.

 

Postgraduate students and Alumni

Dr David Leaper's thesis, Consistency in Performance in the Group Oral Discussion Test: An Interactional Competence Perspective, supervised by Associate Professor Mehdi Riazi, was an award finalist in the ETS Jacqueline Ross TOEFL Dissertation Award. Congratulations David!

Alumnus Dr Joshua Kidd recently published his first book, titled Face and Enactment of Identities in the L2 Classroom (Multilingual Matters, 2016). More information about the book is available here.

Josh Kidd completed his PhD in Applied Linguistics at Macquarie in 2014, under the guidance of Dr Jill Murray and the late Professor Christopher Candlin. His book is based on his research combined with more than 20 years teaching, curriculum development and education research in Japan. The book highlights miscommunication issues in classrooms that stem from emerging identities, with advice on helping teachers to become more aware of cross-cultural pragmatics and evaluate existing practices.

Reports: Conferences, workshops and special events

Applied Linguistics at JALT 2015 (SHIZUOKA, JAPAN, 20-23 November 2015)

Japan in November is usually cool to cold; however 2015 saw some wonderfully warm weather and blue skies for the Japan Association of Language Teachers (JALT) international conference in Shizuoka. Dr Phil Chappell, Kylie Coaldrake and Dr Alice Chik (Education), together with a dozen or so Macquarie HDR students and several hundred other language teachers, attended the three-day conference.

LINGLINE 99 March 2016Kylie worked tirelessly at Macquarie's exhibition booth, fielding enquiries, advising on coursework and research degrees, and arranging follow-up appointments with Phil and Alice. This is a key component of the annual JALT visit that ensures we attract high calibre students well into the future.

Phil and Alice were both featured speakers, and delivered presentations as well as each running a two-hour workshop. Phil also convened the Graduate Student Showcase, where six Macquarie HDR students presented their work. This session was well attended, which was fortunate, as all presentations showcased interesting, well-conceived and significant research studies. This was a great demonstration of the calibre of HDR students that Applied Linguistics at Macquarie attracts, as well as the quality of supervision that the students receive. Macquarie graduate Simon Humphries once again convened a Research Students Roundtable session with all Macquarie HDR students where they discussed the current status of their work. As Simon said afterwards, people reported to him that they found this a useful session. Being a distance PhD student often involves some feelings of isolation, which makes these "add-ons" to our conference attendances important. Alice Chik also held a "meet and greet" in the publishers' exhibition to promote her books.

LINGLINE 99 March 2016Nestled below the commanding presence of Mt Fuji, we did have time for some socialising. Macquarie hosted a party on the Saturday night for its alumni, and the conversation flowed as quickly as the drinks and snacks. Phil welcomed everyone and also spent a few moments encouraging everyone to reflect on the contributions of three recently departed giants of Linguistics at Macquarie: Professors Ruqaiya Hasan and Chris Candlin, and Associate Professor David Hall.

A couple of days before the conference, Phil and Kylie visited several education agents in Tokyo to promote the Applied Linguistics and Translating and Interpreting programs. Phil also ran an evening workshop for language teachers at ICC World, Tokyo. These kind of visits by academic staff are invaluable for marketing our programs as well as sharing our expertise. The feedback from ICC is as follows:

All participants gave positive feedback, and they enjoyed your seminar so much.

We do appreciate you doing such a great seminar at ICC.  We've already received inquiries concerning TESOL course at MQ from some of them and I believe they will apply for MQ for 2016-2017.

In sum, the conference was testament to the thriving international Applied Linguistics and TESOL community of which Linguistics at Macquarie is an important part. Given the interest that was shown to Kylie at our promotional booth, we certainly have a well established reputation to be proud of and to uphold.

- Contribution by Dr Phil Chappell

Features

Celebrating the new linguistics space in C5A with meaningful art

The long awaited refurbishment of the Linguistics Department C5A Building has been completed, in the record time of five months, by the company Inaphase. The new interior has proven to be a hit among staff, showcasing crisp modern features in neutral tones, complemented with splashes of turquoise and copper.

To celebrate, the Department of Linguistics recently held an opening in the elegant space, during which they unveiled the newly installed artwork created by members of the Macquarie University Visual Voices Art Group. The group was established in August 2014 by speech pathologist Christine Sheard in the Macquarie University Speech and Hearing Clinic. The group encourages people with some physical paralysis and language communication difficulties (aphasia) following stroke, to use art as a medium to practise friendship, social participation, renewed self-identity and autonomy.

LINGLINE 99 March 2016   LINGLINE 99 March 2016

Left: "We are Ubuntu" artwork with artists and support staff from Macquarie University Visual Voices Art Group.  Right: Christine Sheard, who established the Art Group, with Executive Dean FoHS, Professor Simon Handley, and members of the Department of Linguistics.  

The unveiled piece pictured is called "We are Ubuntu" from three artists from the group, John Giliberti, Olegario Gonzalez, Alasdair MacLennan and their artistic facilitators Viviene Mewing, Romny Vandoros and Karlene Wilcox; who named the piece after the African term "Ubuntu" which means "l am what I am because of who we are". The artwork rejoices in the fact that communication can occur in more ways than just via speech and that its ultimate success resides also in the attitudes and engagement of people in all our social contexts.

Dr Deanna Wong wins Spoken BNC2014 early access data grant

LINGLINE 99 March 2016In January 2016, Dr Deanna Wong was awarded a Spoken BNC2014 Early Access Data Grant from the ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Sciences at Lancaster University and Cambridge University Press. The grant is intended to allow researchers early access to a 5 000 000 word pre-release sample of the 2014 British National Corpus. As part of the grant, her completed research will be published in a special edition of the International Journal of Corpus Linguistics. Below is a non-technical explanation of her project that was published on the CASS website (Love, 2016).

"Have you ever listened to someone listening? While we might expect that listeners are silent, it turns out that listeners have a lot to say. Mostly, this listener speech happens at the same time as when the speaker is talking, but listeners are not talking to interrupt the speaker. Instead, listeners signal to the speaker that they are paying attention, that they agree with what the speaker has to say, and sometimes, that they are ready to have their turn at talking. The words that listeners use to signal these things can range from a simple mm to whole sentences. To make things even more interesting, how listeners listen varies across different parts of the world.

Sociolinguists use the term 'backchannels' to describe listener speech. Early research identified backchannels by careful investigations of individual conversations. That analysis took time, though, and it was not until researchers were able to access language corpora that we started to get a sense of the nature of backchannels in conversation on a larger scale.

However, looking for evidence of backchannels in a corpus has its own challenges. If the actual language used by listeners is to be uncovered, we cannot assume that they take a specific form. Otherwise, we might miss something important! The key to unlocking this information is to use corpus annotation. Annotation is simply a way of marking what is happening in the talk. For example, corpus annotation can be used to indicate who is speaking, and if they are speaking at the same time so that their speech overlaps.

In my investigation into the Spoken BNC 2014, I will be using annotation that marks overlapping speech to help identify potential backchannels in conversations from across the United Kingdom. The size of the corpus, and its accompanying information about its speakers will add to our understanding of how British speakers backchannel. It will also help us to compare their backchannels to those produced by speakers of English in other parts of the world."

The BNC2014 research team is led by Distinguished Professor Tony McEnery, who will be returning with his colleagues Professor Paul Baker, Dr Vaclav Brezina, and Dr Dana Gablasova to Macquarie for another Corpus Workshop in November this year.

Love, R. (2016). The Spoken BNC2014 early access projects: Part 1. Retrieved 03 March 2016 from ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS): http://cass.lancs.ac.uk/?p=1902

- Contribution by Dr Deanna Wong

Linguist in the limelight (1): Dr Joe Blythe

LINGLINE 99 March 2016Dr Joe Blythe recently joined the department, and told LINGLINE a bit about himself.

"I recently joined the Department of Linguistics in February. It's a quite roundabout journey that brings me here to Macquarie. Although as an undergrad at the University of Western Australia I became fascinated with Aboriginal languages, I couldn't imagine myself as an academic. I instead went to the outback. In 1995 I got my first job as a Teacher-Linguist at the Katherine Regional Aboriginal Language Centre, which tragically no longer operates. I then became a regional linguist at the Kimberley Language Resource Centre in Halls Creek in the East Kimberley. I also consulted to Mirima Dawang Woorlab-gerring Language and Culture Centre in Kununurra and Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Language Centre in South Hedland. This was exciting hands-on applied linguistics with Aboriginal people who are totally dedicated to seeing their languages remain strong and vital. In the late 1990s these Western Australian languages centres were well resourced by ATSIC funds and had a substantial number of staff engaged in language maintenance activities. They mostly still are but the demise of ATSIC has made the revenue stream much more precarious for regional languages centres.

In 2004, I eventually mustered up the courage to start a PhD at the University of Sydney. I studied conversational person reference in the Northern Territory language Murrinhpatha. While I might have chosen an easier language to work on, I can't imagine choosing a more interesting one.  Its sibling-inflected grammar has infected my brain. I'm always puzzling about how people converse in languages with kin-based grammars, what drives such languages to evolve, and how children could possibly learn them.

These issues have been motivating my research ever since. A postdoc on Murrinhpatha kinship at ANU was followed by second postdoc at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics at Nijmegen, in the Netherlands. My work on Murrinhpatha formed part of a larger MPI project comparing conversational interaction in unrelated languages on different continents. In 2013 I received an Australian Research Council early career research award to study the acquisition of Murrinhpatha kinship terms and kin-based grammar at the University of Melbourne. I am continuing my DECRA project here at Macquarie, as well as investigating the use of Aboriginal languages in social interaction."

- Contribution by Dr Joe Blythe

PhD student Thushara Gamage visits Sri Lanka

LINGLINE 99 March 2016Thushara Gamage, a third-year HDR student in the Department of Linguistics, visited Sri Lanka recently to conduct her concluding interviews with the teacher participants of her PhD study.

Her research involves evaluating if computer-assisted language learning projects between primary schools in Sri Lanka and Australia have the potential to promote communicative competence in English and intercultural communicative competence.

She says that it was very inspiring to observe that 99% of the students from a government school in Sri Lanka who participated in one of the case studies that she conducted, have opted to follow English medium education in Year 6, which is when High School starts in Sri Lanka.

According to the teacher who implemented the project in Sri Lanka, the project inspired the students and parents to join these classes and he is eager to continue to sustain such projects using VoiceThread and Edmodo in the school.

Image: Thushara Gamage with the coordinating teacher of The Communicative English Language Learning Project, Mr Anil Vithanange.

- Contribution by Thushara Gamage

Linguist in the limelight (2): Dr Titia Benders

LINGLINE 99 March 2016LINGLINE finally managed to catch up with Dr Titia Benders, who told us a bit about herself, and how she ended up at Macquarie.

"I'm a developmental phonetician: I use phonetic methods to answer questions about early child development. My most urgent questions concern toddlers saying "nana" instead of "banana". With the help of a Macquarie New Staff Grant I will soon be running experiments with toddlers (18-24 months old) to investigate this issue. Recruitment of toddlers for this project will start soon!

I became a developmental phonetician through nine years of training (BA, MA, PhD) at the University of Amsterdam. My first encounter with the joys of phonetics was in Pauls Boersma's unit. Spectrograms excited me so much that I even convinced my Russian conversation-exchange buddy to record and look at his Dutch vowels, under the pretence that this would reduce his accent. My interest in language development continued in my PhD, which resulted in a computational implementation of the relationship between parental input and infant phoneme perception. During my PhD, I also taught the course that first got me hooked on phonetics. And I'm happy to now pass these skills on to Macquarie's developing phoneticians.

Even though mostly trained in Amsterdam, I spent the final semesters of both my MA and my PhD abroad. When I started my MA, Amsterdam didn't have a babylab, so I took off to Suzanne Curtin at the University of Calgary for a study on infant word recognition. The lack of an Amsterdam babylab was solved during my PhD project and I tested many parents and children there. When data collection was done, I took off to the MARCS Institute at Western Sydney University to visit Paola Escudero and to write my thesis. Importantly, this last visit also gave me a taste of Sydney life!

After my PhD I first returned to the Netherlands, for a post-doc with Paula Fikkert at the Radboud University Nijmegen. I co-supervised student projects on turn-taking, language learning from songs, bilingual acquisition, and early speech perception and production. My own research focussed on infant-directed speech. All this work in developmental phonetics was (and still is) hugely fascinating to me, but I wanted to learn more about statistics. My radical solution was a transfer to the University of Newcastle (Australia again!). Lecturing statistics to the third and fourth year psychology students and collaborating with my new colleagues there offered me the deeper understanding I had been looking for. But I missed linguistics dearly.

The job opening at Macquarie was a golden opportunity, as this department manages to combine all my interests under one roof! I'm therefore extremely happy to be under the Macquarie roof as well. After getting settled in 2015, I will use 2016 to conduct the aforementioned "banana" study and refurbish the speech perception lab with the help of a Macquarie Infrastructure Grant. By the end of 2016, we will have a little bit more knowledge about and a lot more facilities to further study what I'm here for: developmental phonetics!"

- Contribution by Dr Titia Benders

Linguists In the Media

Lorna Betts, a student in the Master of Speech and Language Pathology, created a video on stuttering for an assessment task in 2015. The video was developed as a resource for adolescents who stutter.

The video has garnered quite a bit of interest - watch it here.

 Alexandra Grey has recently published three blog posts on high profile research community blogs relating to foreign affairs and China Studies:

Language on the Move

Language on the Move has started the new year with a redesign. Check out our new look at http://www.languageonthemove.com/!

Since January we have published the following research blog posts:

If you missed anything going on at Language on the Move in 2015, check out our 2015 annual review. Feel free to subscribe to Language on the Move (in the site footer) to keep up to date with what is going on in our research group.

You might also be interested in a recent Quartz article about foreign accents and discrimination featuring Language on the Move (and, yes, we've noticed that the article erroneously says that MQ is in Brisbane ... other than that, the content is pretty accurate).

Upcoming Events

Workshop: Developmental Perspectives on Language Processing

This workshop, co-sponsored by the ARC Laureate Fellowship held by Distinguished Professor Katherine Demuth, the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders (CCD), the Centre for Language Sciences (CLaS) and the Child Language Lab, will be held in the Level 1 Theatre, the Australian Hearing Hub, on 12-13 May 2016.

Keynote speakers are Professor Phaedra Royle from the Université de Montréal, Professor Jesse Snedeker from Harvard University, A/Professor Karsten Steinhauer from McGill University and Professor John Trueswell from the University of Pennsylvania.

More information is available here.

Department of Linguistics seminar series

The schedule for the 2016 Department of Linguistics seminar series is now available. Seminars take place from 1-2pm, in AHH 1.640. Talks will be webcast and recorded. Visit this link to listen live or at your leisure.

DATE SPEAKER TITLE
8/03/2016 Professor Linda  Cupples

Do semantic and phonological aspects of spoken word knowledge predict reading ability in children with hearing loss? 

 

29/03/2016 Professor David McAlpine Processing speech in background noise - the effect of hidden hearing loss
10/05/2016 A/Professor David Butt "What's aught but as 'tis valued?": the verb BE and its synonyms
31/05/2016 Dr Joe Blythe Children's conceptualisation of Murrinhpatha classificatory kinship
14/06/2016 Dr Mike Proctor Rime and reason: new Insights into English syllable structure
9/08/2016 Dr Nick Wilson Swearing in sport: managing leadership identity across public and private domains
30/08/2016 A/Professor Annabelle Lukin Understanding ideology: a dialogue between linguistics and sociology
13/09/2016 Dr Jorg Buchcholz TBA
11/10/2016 Dr Sharyn Black and Dr Cassi Liadet From "As we live in the world" to "In a modern global context": measuring learner uptake of literacy skills across an undergraduate academic communication unit.
25/10/2016 A/Professor Mehdi Riazi Philosophical (worldviews) underpinning the mixed-methods research: implications for research outcomes
8/11/2016

Dr Haidee Kruger and Professor Bertus van Rooy

 

Combining corpus methods with construction grammar: modelling the construction network of verb complement clauses in Afrikaans

 

Conference calls and funding opportunities

Focus on the learner: Contributions of individual differences to second language learning and teaching

Conference dates: 17-19 October 2016

Conference venue:  State University of Applied Sciences, Konin, Poland

Submission deadline: 31 May 2016

Conference website

New Colombo Plan (NCP) Mobility program applications open

The New Colombo Plan (NCP) is a signature initiative of the Australian Government which aims to lift knowledge of the Indo-Pacific in Australia by supporting Australian undergraduates to study and undertake internships in the region.  Applications for the 2017 Round of the New Colombo Plan (NCP) Mobility Program will open on 1 April. More information is available here. For more information, contact Sanyu Mugambwa from MI.

HDR Corner

TIRF 2016 Doctoral dissertations grants competition

TIRF - The International Research Foundation for English Language Education - is pleased to announce its 2016 Doctoral Dissertation Grants (DDG) competition. Grants of up to US $5,000 will be made to successful applicants investigating any of the following topics:

  • Digital technology in language education
  • English as a medium of instruction
  • Language assessment
  • Language planning and policy
  • Language teacher education
  • Plurilingualism in business, industry, the professions, and educational contexts 
  • Students' age and effective English language education in schools  

The application deadline is Wednesday, 20 April 2016. For further information, including accessing the call for proposals, resource videos, frequently asked questions, and information about past recipients and their studies, please visit http://www.tirfonline.org/research-grants/doctoral-dissertation-grants/

News from the Library

Curated by your Research Librarians Heather Cooper, Grai Calvey and Jane Van Balen

New Library Resources

Kanopy is one of the library's online video streaming services. This collection includes thousands of award winning documentaries, training films, theatrical releases and more.

 You can even make short video clips from the titles, keep them in your Kanopy playlist account, and use them for teaching or assessments.

The Library has Video streaming subject and research guide to help with information about making clips and the service generally. Or view this video which explains the benefits of Kanopy and streaming video use at Macquarie University.

ESL & Languages: http://macquarie.kanopystreaming.com/catalog/global-studies-languages/esl-languages

InfoWise

This is an online tutorial for students developed by the Library to support the development of research skills. It is available in iLearn under Student Support; students can self-enrol. 

http://ilearn.mq.edu.au/course/view.php?id=21371

The module can also be embedded in iLearn units in whole or in part; please contact Grai, Jane or Heather for more information.

10 exciting grains on a sandy beach of books

A selection of new Linguistic titles recently added to the Library's collection.

Grammatical inference for computational linguistics (ebook)
Publisher: Morgan & Claypool Publishers
Date: 2016

New Directions in Empirical Translation Process Research: Exploring the CRITT TPR-DB (ebook)
Publisher: Cham: Springer International Publishing
Date: 2016 

Working with interpreters and translators: a guide for speech-language pathologists and audiologists
Publisher: San Diego, CA: Plural Publishing
Date: 2016
Call Number: RC423 .L36 2016

Specialised translation: shedding the 'non-literary' tag(ebook)
Publisher: Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire; New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan 
Date: 2015 

Telepractice in audiology (ebook)
Publisher: San Diego, CA: Plural Publishing
Date: 2016

MATLAB primer for speech-language pathology and audiology
Publisher: San Diego, CA: Plural Publishing, Inc.
Date: 2016
Call Number: RC423 .B68 2016  

Technology and the Treatment of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ebook)
Publisher: Cham: Springer International Publishing
Date: 2016

Interaction Between Attention and Language Systems in Humans: A Cognitive Science Perspective (ebook)
Publisher: Springer India: New Delhi 
Date: 2015 

The Routledge Handbook of English for academic purposes (ebook)
Publisher: Milton Park; New York: Routledge
Date: 2016

Describing Verb Valency: Practical and Theoretical Issues (ebook)
Publisher: Springer International Publishing: Cham
Date: 2015

2015 publications and conference presentations by staff and PhD students

A1. Books/Monographs

Gollin-Kies, S., Hall, D. R., and Moore, S. H. (2015). Language for Specific Purposes. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan

Slade, D., Manidis, M., McGregor, J., Scheeres, H., Chandler, E., Stein-Parbury, J., Dunston, R., Herke, M., Matthiessen, C.M. (2015). Communicating in Hospital Emergency Departments. Heidelberg, Germany: Springer-Verlag.

B1. Book chapters

Benson, P. (2015). YouTube as text: Spoken interaction analysis and digital discourse. In R. Jones, A. Chik, and C. Hafner (Eds.), Discourse and digital practices (pp. 81-96). London: Routledge.

Butt, D. G. (2015) Construe my meaning: Performance, Poetry, and Semiotic Distance. In W. Bowcher and J. Y. Liang (Eds.) Society in Language, Language in Society Essays in Honour of Ruqaiya Hasan (pp.24-55) Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

Butt, D. G. (2015) The 'History of Ideas' and Halliday's natural science of meaning. In J. J. Webster (Ed.), The Bloomsbury Companion to M. A. K. Halliday (pp.17-61) London: Bloomsbury.

Butt, D. G. and Liang, Y. (2015) In Her Own Words: An Interview with Ruqaiya Hasan. In W. Bowcher and J. Y. Liang (Eds.) Society in Language, Language in Society Essays in Honour of Ruqaiya Hasan (pp. 381-411). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Chappell, P. J. (2015). Creativity through inquiry dialogue. In R. H. Jones & J. C. Richards (Eds.), Creativity in language teaching: Perspectives from research and practice (pp. 130-149). London: Routledge.

Cox, F. M. & McLeod, S. (2015). Speech: Phonetics. In S. McLeod & J. McCormack (eds.), Introduction to Speech, Language and Literacy (pp. 83-133). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Crain, S. & Thornton, R. (2015). Third year grammar. In A. Gallego & D. Ott (eds.). 50 years later: Reflections on Chomsky's Aspects. Vol. 77 of MIT Working Papers in Linguistics. Cambridge, MA: MITWPL.

Demuth, K. (2015). The acquisition of prosodic phonology and morphology. In E. Bavin & L. Naigles (eds.), Cambridge Handbook on Child Language (pp. 230-249). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Demuth, K., Dube, S., Miles, K. & Tomas, E. (2015). Morphology. In S. McLeod & J. McCormack (Eds.), Introduction to Speech, Language and Literacy (pp.231-265). South Melbourne, VIC: Oxford University Press.

Djonov, E., Knox, J. S., & Zhao, S. (2015). Interpreting websites in educational contexts: A social-semiotic, multimodal approach. In P. Smeyers, D. Bridges, N. Burbules & M. Griffiths (Eds.), International handbook of interpretation in educational research methods (pp. 315-345). New York: Springer.

Khoo, K. M. (2015) 'Threads of continuity' and Interaction: Coherence, Texture and Cohesive Harmony. In W. Bowcher and J. Y. Liang (Eds.) Society in Language, Language in Society Essays in Honour of Ruqaiya Hasan. (pp. 300-330). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Krebs-Lazendic, L., Xu Rattanasone, N., & Auton, J. (2015). Communication and diagnostic cues. In M.W. Wiggins & T. Loveday (Eds.), Diagnostic expertise in organizational environments (pp. 30-42). Warriewood: Ashgate Publishing.

Psarros C. McMahon CM. (2015). Evaluating a model of telepractice. In E Rushbrooke & T Houston (eds), Telepractice in Audiology (pp 47-90). Plural Publishing.

Lukin, A. (2015). Language, context and text: the contributions of Ruqaiya Hasan. In W. Bowcher and J. Y. Liang (Eds.), Society in Language, Language in Society: Essays in Honour of Ruqaiya Hasan. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Lukin, A. (2015). A linguistics of style: Halliday on literature. In J. J. Webster (Ed.), The Bloomsbury Companion to M.A.K. Halliday. (pp. 348-366). London and New York: Bloomsbury.

Pagano, A., and Lukin, A. (2015). Exploring Language in Verbal Art: a Case Study in K. Mansfield's 'Bliss'. In S. Starc, C. Jones, A. Maiorani (Eds.), Meaning Making in Text: Multimodal and Multilingual Functional Perspectives (pp. 92-108).  Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Peters, P. (2015). Dual adverbs. In P. Collins (ed.), Grammatical Variation in English World-Wide (pp. 179-204). Amsterdam, John Benjamins,.

Peters, P. (2015). Lexicography: The construction of dictionaries and thesauruses In Keith Allan (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Linguistics (pp. 187-204). London: Routledge.

Peters, P., and Wong, D. (2015). Backchannels and turn management. In Aijmer and Ruehlemann (eds.), Corpus Pragmatics: A Handbook. (pp. 408-429). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Piller, I. (2015). Language ideologies. In Tracy, K., C. Ilie & T. Sandel. (Eds.), The International Encyclopaedia of Language and Social Interaction. Boston: Wiley-Blackwell.

Piller, I., and Cho, J. (2015). Neoliberalism as language policy. In T. Ricento (Ed.) Language Policy and Political Economy: English in a Global Context (pp. 162-186). New York: Oxford University Press.

Thornton, R. (2015) Syntax. In S. McLeod & J. McCormack (Eds.) An introduction to speech, language and literacy (pp. 266-300). Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

Thornton, R. (2015). First language acquisition, linguistic theory of. In J. D. Wright (ed.), International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences, 2nd edition, Vol 9 (pp. 206-211). Oxford: Elsevier.

C1. Journal articles

Almeqbel A., & McMahon C. (2015). Objective measurement of high-level cortical function in children. International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 79; 1055-1062. 2015

Amundrud, T. (2015). Individual feedback consultations in Japanese tertiary EFL: A Systemic semiotic exploration. English Australia Journal, 30 (2), 40-64.

 BarnesS., & Ferguson, A. (2015). Conversation partner responses to problematic talk produced by people with aphasia: Some alternatives to initiating, completing, or pursuing repair. Aphasiology, 29 (3), 315-336.

Benson, P. (2015). Commenting to learn: Evidence of language and intercultural learning in YouTube comments. Language Learning and Technology, 19 (3), 88-105.

Best, V., Keidser, G., Buchholz, J. M., Freeston., K. (2015). An examination of speech reception thresholds measured in a simulated reverberant cafeteria environment. Int. J. Audiol. 54, 682-690.

Blythe, J. (2015). Other-initiated repair in Murrinh-Patha. Open Linguistics, 1, 283-308.

Boisvert I., McMahon C. M., Dowell R, Lyxell B. (2015). Long-term asymmetric hearing affects cochlear implantation outcomes differently in adults with pre- and postlingual hearing loss. PLoS ONE 10 (6).

Caple, H., & Knox, J. S. (2015). A framework for the multimodal analysis of online news galleries: What makes a 'good' picture gallery? Social Semiotics, 25 (3), 292-321.

Casule, I. (2014) Evidence for a Burushaski- Phrygian connection. Acta Orientalia, 75, 3-31.

Chappell, P., Bodis, A., Jackson, H. (2015). The impact of teacher cognition and classroom practices on IELTS test preparation courses in the Australian ELICOS sector. IELTS Research Reports. No. 7.

Chen, Y., Song, Z., & Wu, C. (2015). Syntactic Linerarity as a Strategy in Simultaneous Interpretation: A Case Study on English-Chinese Interpretation. T&I Review, 5, 29-69.

Ching, T. Y. C., & Cupples, L. (2015). Phonological awareness at 5 years of age in children who use hearing aids or cochlear implants. SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood, 25( 2), 48-59.

Ching T. Y. C, Quar TK, Newall P, Sharma M. (2015). Comparing NAL-NL1 and DSL v5 in hearing aids fit to children with severe or profound hearing loss: goodness of fit to targets, impacts on predicted loudness and speech intelligibility. Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, 26, 260-274.

Ching, T.Y.C., Rattanasone Xu, N., Macdonald, G., Zhang, W.V., Button, L., & Demuth, K. (2015). Intelligibility of speech produced by children with hearing loss: conventional amplification versus nonlinear frequency compression in hearing aids. Journal of Communication Disorders, Deaf Studies & Hearing Aids, 3(3), 1000135.

Cho, J. (2015) Sleepless in Seoul: neoliberalism, English fever, and linguistic insecurity among Korean interpreters. Multilingua, 34 (5), 687-710.

Cramer, R. (2015). German Ordnung: A semantic and ethnopragmatic analysis of a core cultural value. International Journal of Language and Culture, 2 (2), 269-293.

Cubirka, L., BarnesS., & Ferguson, A. (2015). Student speech pathologists' experiences of an aphasia therapy group. Aphasiology, 29 (12), 1497-1515.

Dahm, M., Yates, L., Ogden, K., Rooney, K. and Sheldon, B. (2015). Enhancing international medical graduates' communication: Applied linguists' contribution, Medical Education, 49, 828-837.

Dingemanse, M., Roberts, S. G., Baranova, J., Blythe, J., Drew, P., Floyd, S., Gísladóttir, R., Kendrick, K., Levinson, S.C., Manrique, E., Rossi, G., Enfield, N. J. (2015). Universal Principles in the Repair of Communication Problems. PLoS One, 10 (9), 1-15.

Edwards, E., and Roger, P. (2015). Seeking out challenges to develop L2 self-confidence: A language learner's journey to proficiency. TESL-EJ 18 (4), 1-24. Available online at http://www.tesl-ej.org/pdf/ej72/a3.pdf

Floyd, C. B. (2015). Closing the gap: International student pathways, academic performance and academic acculturation. Journal of Academic Language and Learning, 9 (2), A1-A18.

Glyde, H., Buchholz, J. M., L. Best, V., Dillon, H., Cameron, S., Hickson (2015). Understanding the role of audibility in spatial release from speech-on-speech masking. J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 138, 3311-3319.

Gu, M., and Benson, P. (2015). The formation of English teacher identities: A Cross-cultural investigation. Language Teaching Research, 19 (2), 187-206.

Harvey, M., Lin, S., Turpin, M., Davies, B., & Demuth, K. (2015). Contrastive and non-contrastive pre-stopping in Kaytetye. Australian Journal of Linguistics, 35, 232-250.

Huan, C.P. & Wu, C. (2015). Appraisal Framework: A Review of its Recent Development. Contemporary Foreign Languages Studies, 4:15-22,42. (In Chinese)
http://www.ddwyyj.com/EN/volumn/volumn_1203.shtml

Hussain, Q. (2015). Temporal characteristics of Punjabi word-medial singletons and geminates. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 138 (4), EL388-EL392.

Inoue, I., & Candlin, C. N. (2015). Applying Task-Based Learning to translator education: Assisting the development of novice translator's problem-solving expertise. Translation and Interpreting Studies (Special issue: T&I pedagogy in dialogue with other disciplines). 10 (1), 58-86. 

Izadi, D. (2015). Spatial engagement in Persian ethnic shops in Sydney. Multimodal Communication, 4(1), 61-78.

Johnson, R. C., & Riazi, A. M. (2015). Accuplacer Companion in a foreign language context: An argument-based validation of both test score meaning and impact. Papers in Language Testing and Assessment, 4 (1), 31-58.

Kozar, O., Lum, J. and Benson, P. (2015). Reflection: Self-efficacy and vicarious learning in doctoral studies at a distance. Distance Education, 36 (3), 448-454.

Kruger, J. L., Szarkowska, A. and Krejtz, I. (2015). Subtitles on the Moving Image: An Overview of Eye Tracking Studies. Refractory: A journal of Entertainment Media, 25.

Lammertink, I., Casillas, M., Benders, T., Post, B., & Fikkert, P. (2015). Dutch and English toddlers' use of linguistic cues in predicting upcoming turn transitions. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, 495. DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00495

Leigh, G., Ching, T. Y. C., Crowe, K., Cupples, L., Marnane, V., & Seeto, M. (2015). Factors affecting psychosocial and motor development in 3-year-old children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 20(4), 331-342.

Liardét, C.L.  (2015). Academic literacy and grammatical metaphor: Mapping development. TESOL International Journal, 10 (1). 29-46.

Lin, S. & Demuth, K. (2015).  Children's Acquisition of English Onset and Coda /l/: Articulatory Evidence.  Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 58, 13-27.

Lo, C., McMahon CM, Looi V. Thompson W.F. (2015). Melodic contour training and its effect on speech in noise, consonant discrimination, and prosody perception for cochlear implant recipients." Behavioural Neurology, Article ID 352869

Lochrin M, Arciuli J, Sharma M. (2015). Assessing the relationship between prosody and reading outcomes in children using the PEPS-C. Scientific Studies of Reading, Special Edition, 19 (1) 72-85.

Lukin, A. (2015). Australia's State of the Union: the construction of a 'narrative' in Australian federal budget speeches. Australian Journal of Political Science. 50 (2). 258-278.

Mann, K., Power, E., BarnesS., McDonald, S., Tate, R., & Togher, L. (2015). Questioning in conversations before and after communication partner training for individuals with traumatic brain injury. Aphasiology, 29 (9), 1082-1109.

Mealings, K. T., Dillon, H., Buchholz, J. M., & Demuth, K. (2015). An assessment of open plan and enclosed classroom listening environments for young children: Part 1 - Children's questionnaires. Journal of Educational, Pediatric & (Re)Habilitative Audiology.

Mealings, K. T., Demuth, K., Buchholz, J. M., Dillon, H. (2015). An assessment of open plan and enclosed classroom listening environments for young children: Part 2 - Teachers' questionnaires. Journal of Educational, Pediatric and (Re)Habilitative Audiology, 1.

Mealings, K., Buchholz, J. M., K., Demuth, Dillon, H. (2015). Investigating the acoustics of a sample of open plan and enclosed Kindergarten classrooms in Australia. Applied Acoustics, 100, 95-105.

Mealings, K., Demuth, K., Buchholz, J. M., Dillon, H. (2015). The development of the Mealings, Demuth, Dillon, and Buchholz Classroom Speech Perception Test (MDDB CSPT). J. of Speech, Language, and Hear. Res. 58, 1350-1362.

Mealings, K., Demuth, K., Buchholz, J. M., Dillon, H. (2015). The effect of different open plan and enclosed classroom acoustic conditions on speech perception in Kindergarten children. J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 138, 2458-2469.

Oreinos, C., Buchholz, J. M. (2015). Objective analysis of Ambisonics for hearing aid applications: Effect of listener's head, room reverberation, and directional microphones. J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 137, 3447-3465.

Peters, P. (2015).  Transcending their Formats:  Dictionaries, Encyclopedias and Atlases. Humanities Australia 6, 68-81

Redelinghuys, K., & Kruger, H. (2015). Using the features of translated language to investigate translation expertise: A corpus-based study. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 20 (3), 293-325.

Reid, A., Burnham, D., Kasisopa, B., Reilly, R., Attina, V., Xu Rattanasone, N., & Best, C.T. (2015). Perceptual assimilation of lexical tone: The roles of language experience and visual information. Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics, 77, 571-591.

Ren, Y., Wyver, S., Xu Rattanasone, N., & Demuth, K. (2015). Social competence and language skills in Mandarin-English bilingual preschoolers: Moderation effect of emotion regulation. Early Education and Development. doi:10.1080/10409289.2015.1066639

Smedley, A., Crawford, T., & Cloete, L. (2015). An intervention aimed at reducing plagiarism in undergraduate nursing students. Nurse Education in Practice, 15 (3), 168-173.

Smith-Khan, L, Crock, M, McCallum, R. & Saul, B. (2015). 'Up to now I am suffering': Justice, sexual violence and disability amongst refugees in Uganda. International Journal of Migration and Border Studies, 1 (4), 348-371.

Smith-Khan, L, Crock, M, Saul, B & McCallum, R, (2015). To 'Promote, Protect and Ensure': Overcoming obstacles to identifying disability in forced migration. Journal of Refugee Studies, 28 (1), 38-68.

Song, J. Y., Shattuck-Hufnagel, S. & Demuth, K.  2015. Development of phonetic variants (allophones) in 2-year-olds learning American English: A study of alveolar stop /t, d/ codas. Journal of Phonetics, 52, 152-169.

Theodore, R., Demuth, K., & Shattuck-Hufnagel, S. 2015. Examination of the locus of positional effects on children's production of plural -s: Considerations from local and global speech planning. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 58, 946-953.

Thornton, R. and Rombough, K. (2015). The syntax-PF interface in children's negative sentences. Language Acquisition, 22, 132-157.

Tomas, E., Demuth, K., Smith-Lock, K. M., & Petocz, P. (2015). Phonological and morphophonological effects on grammatical development in children with specific language impairment. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 50(4), 516-528.

Van Rooy, B., & Kruger, H. (2015). The case for an emergentist approach. Stellenbosch Papers in Linguistics Plus, 48, 41-67.

Tsukada, K., Xu, H. L., & Xu Rattanasone, N. (2015). The perception of Mandarin lexical tones by listeners from different linguistic backgrounds. Chinese as a Second Language Research, 4(2), 141-161.

Wanrooij, K., Boersma, P. & Benders, T. (2015). Observed effects of "distributional learning" may not relate to the number of peaks: A test of "dispersion" as a confounding factor. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, 1341. DOI:10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01341

Westermann, A., Buchholz, J. M. (2015). The effect of spatial separation in distance on the intelligibility of speech in rooms. J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 137, 757-767.

Westermann, A., Buchholz, J. M. (2015). The influence of informational masking in reverberant, multi-talker environments. J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 138, 584-593.

Willoughby-Knox, B. and Yates, L. (2015). The emotional dimension of 'mixing' in an internationalised classroom: A pathway program case study. International HETL Review, Vol. 5, Article 1.

Yates, L. (2015). Intercultural communication and the transnational: Managing impressions at work, Multilingua, 34 (6), 773-795.

Yates, L. & Major, G. (2015). "Quick-chatting", "smart dogs", and how to "say without saying": Small talk and pragmatic learning in the community. System, 48, 141-152.

Yuen, I., Miles, K., Cox, F. & Demuth, K. (2015). The syllabic status of final consonants in early speech: A case study. Journal of Child Language, 42, 682-694.

Yong-Ho Kim & Kellogg, D. (2015). Learning Good and Bad from a North Korean Monster Movie: Bakhtin's early writing and children's early thinking. Knowledge Cultures, 3 (4), 153-170.

Yong-Ho Kim & Kellogg, D. (2015). Rocks and other hard places: tracing ethical thinking in Korean and English dialog, Language and Education, 29:6, 493-508, DOI: 10.1080/09500782.2015.1049616

Zhan, L., Crain, S., & Zhou, P. (2015). The online processing of only if- and even if- conditional statements: Implications for mental models. Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 27(3), 367-379.

Zhou, P., Crain, S., Gao, L., Tang, Y., & Jia, M. (2015). The use of grammatical morphemes by Mandarin-speaking children with high functioning autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 45 (5), 1428-1436.

E1. Conference papers published in proceedings

Cox, F., Palethorpe, S. & Miles, K. (2015). The role of contrast maintenance in the temporal structure of the rhyme, Proceedings of the 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, Glasgow, 10-14 August 2015.

Davis, C., Shaw, J., Proctor, M., Derrick, D., Sherwood, S., & Kim, J. (2015). Examining speech production using masked priming. In The Scottish Consortium for ICPhS 2015 (ed.), Proc. 18th Intl. Congress of Phonetic Sciences (ICPhS). Glasgow, 10-14 Aug. 2015: Paper# 560

Ding, J., Peters, P. & Smith, A. (2015).  The Construction of Online Health TermFinder and its English-Chinese Bilingualization. In I. Kosem, M. Jakubíček, J. Kallas, S. Krek (Eds.), Electronic lexicography in the 21st century: linking lexical data in the digital age. Proceedings of the eLex 2015 conference, 11-13 August 2015, Herstmonceux Castle, United Kingdom. Ljubljana/Brighton: Trojina, Institute for Applied Slovene Studies/Lexical Computing Ltd.

Harvey, M., Davies, B., Lin, S., Turpin, M., Ross, A. & Demuth, K. (2015). Two types of pre-stopping in Kaytetye. Proceedings of the Forty-Ninth Annual Meeting of the Chicago Linguistic Society, Helena Aparicio, Gallagher Flinn, Kathryn Franich, Joanna Pietraszko, Tamara Vardomskaya  (eds.), pp. 145-152.

Hussain, Q., Harvey, M., Proctor, M., & Demuth, K. (2015). Contrast reduction among coronals is conditioned by the following vowel. In The Scottish Consortium for ICPhS 2015 (ed.), Proc. 18th Intl. Congress of Phonetic Sciences (ICPhS). Glasgow, 10-14 Aug. 2015: Paper# 496

Lin, S., Harvey, M., Turpin, M., Ross, A., Demuth, K. (2015). The articulation of contrastive and non-contrastive pre-stopped consonants in Kaytetye. In J. Stuart-Smith, J. Scobbie, A. Turk (Eds.) Proceedings of the 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences. Glasgow UK: University of Glasgow.

Mealings, K.T., Demuth, K., Buchholz, J., & Dillon, H. (2015). An assessment of different sized open plan and enclosed Kindergarten classroom listening environments. In Kessissoglou, N., and Doolan, C. (Eds.) Proceedings of Acoustics 2015 Hunter Valley: Annual Conference of the Australian Acoustical Society, paper 95. The Australian Acoustical Society: Australia.

Proctor, M., Lo, C.Y., & Narayanan, S. (2015). Articulation of English Vowels in Running Speech: a Real-time MRI Study. In The Scottish Consortium for ICPhS 2015 (ed.), Proc. 18th Intl. Congress of Phonetic Sciences (ICPhS). Glasgow, 10-14 Aug. 2015: Paper# 220, 1-4

Schmidt, E., Post, B., Kung, C., Yuen, I., & Demuth, K. (2015). The effect of listener and speaker gender on the perception of rises in AusE. In J. Stuart-Smith, J. Scobbie, A. Turk (Eds.) Proceedings of the 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences. Glasgow UK: University of Glasgow.

Shinohara, S., Hussain, Q., & Ooigawa, T. (2015). Does allophonic knowledge of L1 contribute to the correct discrimination of non-native sounds? In The Scottish Consortium for ICPhS 2015 (Eds.), Proceedings of the 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences (pp. 1-5). Glasgow, UK: University of Glasgow. Paper number 368.

Szakay, A. & E. Torgersen (2015). An acoustic analysis of voice quality in London English: The effect of gender, ethnicity and f0. In The Scottish Consortium for ICPhS 2015 (Ed.), Proceedings of the 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences. Glasgow, UK: the University of Glasgow. Paper number 0996.

Tsukada, K., Cox, F., Hajek, J. & Hirata, Y. (2015). Perception of Italian and Japanese singleton/geminate consonants by listeners from different language background, Proceedings of the 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, Glasgow, 10-14 August 2015.

Wang, A. (2015). Pragmatic Information in Learner's Dictionaries: Redefined. In Lan Li, J. Mckeown, Liming Liu (Eds.), Words, Dictionaries and Corpora: Innovations in reference science. Proceedings of Asialex 2015 (pp. 204-212). Hong Kong: The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

Yuen, I., Cox, F. & Demuth, K. (2015). Anticipatory planning of r-insertion in Australian English, Proceedings of the 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, Glasgow, 10-14 August 2015.

Conference presentations

Aljahdali, S. A. (2015). Viewing the World in Santiago's Eyes: A Systemic-Functional Reading of Character Focalization and Evaluation in Coelho's O Alquimista in English, Arabic and Turkish. Australian Systemic Functional Linguistics Association Conference. Brisbane Sep 29-1 Oct 2015. University of Queensland, Brisbane.

Amundrud, T. (2015). The topology of an EFL consultation genre: Its composition and implications for teaching. Japan Association for Language Teaching International Conference. 20-22 November, 2015. Granship Shizuoka, Japan.

Benders, T. & Arts, F. (2015). Infant-directed speech by Fathers: Acoustic determinants of the emotional message? Experimental Psychology Conference. 8-11 April 2015. Sydney: Sydney University.

Benders, T. & Van Ravenzwaaij, D. (2015). Bayes for Babies. Workshop on Infant Language Development. 10-12 June 2015. Stockholm: Stockholm University.

Benders, T., Snijders, T.E., & Fikkert, P. (2015). Songs for early word learning - An electrophysiological study. Workshop on Infant Speech Perception. 1-2 September 2015. Sydney: Macquarie University.

Benson, P. (2015). Depths of multilingualism in the linguistic landscape of a Sydney suburb. Australian Linguistics Society Conference. 9-11 December 2015. Sydney: Western Sydney University,

Benson, P. (2015). Multiculturalism and the multilingual landscape of a Sydney suburb. ALAA/ALANZ/ALTAANZ 2015: Learning in a multilingual world. 30 November - 2 December 2015. Adelaide: University of South Australia.

Benson, P., Chehade, M., Lara, J., Sayram, G., and Speer, L. (2015). Sustainability and transferability in innovation in intensive pre-university English language courses - Symposium. TESOL Research Network Colloquium. 5 September, 2015. University of Sydney.

Best, V., Mason, C. R., Swaminathan, J., Kidd, G. Jr., Jakien, K. M., Kampel, S. D., Gallun, F. J., Buchholz, J. M., Glyde, H. (2015).  On the contribution of target audibility to performance in spatialized speech mixtures. 17th International Symposium on Hearing, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Blythe, J., Crane, A., Meakins, F., Gardner, R., Mushin, I., Singer, R., & Stirling, L. (2015). Recruiting next speaker: A multimodal comparison of informal conversation in six Australian Aboriginal languages. Australian Linguistic Society conference: Western Sydney University.

Blythe, J., Gaby, A., & Stoakes, H. (2015). Absolute spatial cognition without Absolute spatial language. Australian Linguistic Society conference: Western Sydney University.

Blythe, J., Mansfield, J., & Davidson, L. (2015). Murrinhpatha speaking children's understanding of classificatory kinship. 14th annual Australian Languages Workshop, Kioloa, NSW.

Boisvert, I. (2015). [Guest speaker] A practical guide to sound deprivation and cochlear implantation in adults. IX International Meeting on Advances in Audiology, Salamanca, Spain.

Bower, J. (2015). The CEFR-J in practice. In Naganuma, N., & Schmidt, G (Chairs), 2nd Conference on Critical, Constructive assessment of the CEFR.

Bower, J. (2015). Equating three in-house achievement tests of English reading and listening at a Japanese university using Rasch common item equating. Paper presented at the Pacific Rim Objective Measurement Symposium 2015.

Bower, J. (2015). Initial Results from an Argument-Based Test Validation of CEFR-Aligned Tests of Reading and Listening, Focusing on the Development Phase of Validation. Paper presented at the 19th Annual conference of the Japan Language Testing Association.

Bower, J., & Rutson-Griffiths, A. (2015). Relationship between TOEIC Word List Study with Spaced Repetition Software & TOEIC Score Gains. Paper presented at the Hiroshima JALT 2015 Mini-Conference.

Buchholz, J. M., Oreinos, C., Keidser, G., and Best, V. (2015). Virtual environments for auditory research and for addressing hearing devices. International forum for hearing instrument developers, Oldenburg, Germany.

Butt, D. G. (2015) "Is anybody there?" Inheritance and development in the activity of poets. Australian Systemic Functional Linguistics Association (ASFLA) Conference: Linguistics, literature, and verbal art: Inheritance and Developments. Uni. of Queensland

Butt, D. G. (2015). The meaning of "persona": the Systemic Functional Tradition in Linguistics and Debates on the Evolution of Human Consciousness. The Making of Meaning: Grammar, Science, and Consciousness. The 14th National Conference on Functional Linguistics: Beijing Normal University.

Butt, D. G. & Khoo, K. M. (2015). Verbal arts, poetics, and the silent legislation of thought. Australian and New Zealand Association for Psychotherapy Conference. August 6-9 2015. Sydney.

Butt, D. G.; Moore, A.; Khoo, K.; Henderson-Brooks, C. (2015) Turbulence at Heart: what a linguist learned about language from the psychotherapist's 'grammar of empathy'. International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation Conference: Broken Structures, Broken Selves: Complex Trauma in the 21st Century. Sydney.

Chappell, P.J. (2015). IELTS test preparation courses in ELICOS: Teacher beliefs, knowledge and classroom practices. English Australia National Conference: Looking ahead: change challenge and opportunity. 24-25 September, 2015. Hilton Hotel Brisbane, Australia.

Chappell, P.J. (2015). Seeing the Invisible: investigating classroom talk. Japan Association for Language Teaching International Conference. 20-22 November, 2015. Granship Shizuoka, Japan.

Chappell, P.J. (2015). Teacher Cognition in Test Preparation Courses. Japan Association for Language Teaching International Conference. 20-22 November, 2015. Granship Shizuoka, Japan.

Chappell, P.J. (2015). The Buzz about Creativity. University English Language Centres of Australia PD Fest. 2 May, 2015. Macquarie University English Language Centre, Sydney, Australia.

Chen, H., Xu Rattanasone, N., Cox, F. & Demuth, K. (2015) Australian English-learning 24-Month-Olds are Sensitive to Phonemic Vowel Length, Paper presented at the Australian Linguistic Society Conference, Sydney, December 2015.

Chen, H., Xu Rattanasone, N., Cox, F. & Demuth, K. (2015) Effect of Early Dialectal Exposure on Adult Perception of Phonemic Vowel length. Paper presented at the Australian Linguistic Society Conference, Sydney, December 2015.

Chen, H., Yamane, N., Xu Rattanasone N., Demuth, K., & Mazuka, R. (2015). The sensitivity to vowel length distinction in novel words at 18 months: Evidence from Japanese infants. Workshop on Infant Speech Perception (WISP): Phonological and Lexical Development. 1-2 September 2015. Sydney: Macquarie University.

Chen, H., Yamane, N., Xu Rattanasone N., Demuth, K., & Mazuka, R. (2015). Japanese infants are aware of phonemic vowel length in novel words at 18 months. 40th Boston University Conference on Language Development (BUCLD40). 4-6 November 2015. Boston: Boston University.

Cho, J. (2015). Translational shift from language skills to physical attractiveness: The commodification of the South Korean translation and interpreting industry. Sociolinguistics of Globalization. 4-6 June. 2015. Hong Kong: University of Hong Kong

Cox, F., Palethorpe, S. & Harrington, J. (2015) Diphthong shift in Australian English, Paper presented at the Australian Linguistic Society Conference, Sydney, December 2015.

Crain, S., An, S., Zhou, P., and Thornton, R. (2015, January). Dou and disjunction in child Mandarin. Paper presented at the Linguistic Society of America 2015 Annual Meeting, Portland, USA.

Crawford, T, (2015). An exploration of intercultural nurse-patient health communication. Communications, Medicine and Ethics conference. 25-27 June, 2015. Hong Kong: University of Hong Kong.

Cupples, L., Ching, T. Y. C., Leigh, G., Button, L., & Marnane, V., (2015). Language development in children with hearing loss and additional disabilities. Paper presented at IASSIDD Americas Regional Congress, Honolulu, Hawaii, May 2015.

Dahm, M., Ogden K., Yates L., and Rooney, K. (2015). Bridging Pragmatic Gaps: Strategies to inform feedback on communicative practice for medical educators and internationally trained doctors. New Horizons Conference. 23-25 November 2015, Sydney.

Dillon, H., Beach, E., Yeend, I., Glyde, H., Buchholz, J. M., Mejia, J., Beechey, T., Valderrama, J., Sharma, M, (2015). Loss of speech perception in noise - causes and compensation. Int. Symp. on Auditory and Audiol. Res. (ISAAR), Nyborg, Denmark.

Davies, B., Xu Rattanasone, N., & Demuth, K. (2015). Allomorphic effects on acquisition of the English plural. Workshop on Infant Speech Perception (WISP): Phonological and Lexical Development. 1-2 September 2015. Sydney: Macquarie University.

Davies, B., Xu Rattanasone, N., & Demuth, K. (2015). Revisiting 2;0-year-olds' understanding of plural morphology. 40th Annual Boston University Conference on Language Development (BUCLD40). 4-6 November 2015. Boston: Boston University.

Davies, B. (2015, June). Children's perceptual sensitivity to different English plural allomorphs. Invited colloquium at the CLaS-CCD Eye Tracking Workshop: Language, Vision, Perception and their Interface, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.

Davies, B., Xu Rattanasone, N., & Demuth, K. (2015). Comprehension of English Plural Morphology and the Effects of Allomorphic Variation. Invited talk for the Language and Cognition Seminar Series, Harvard University, Boston, USA.

Davies, B., Xu Rattanasone, N., & Demuth, K. (2015). Three-year-olds' Understanding of the Syllabic Plural Allomorph /əz/. Paper presented at the 46th annual conference of the Australian Linguistic Society, Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia. 

Dube, S. (2015). Effects of type of violation and utterance position on subject-verb agreement processing: An ERP study of L1 and L2 adults. Colloquium at University of Washington Psychology Department. 28 May 2015. Seattle USA: University of Washington. 

Dube, S. (2015). Effects of type of violation and utterance position on subject-verb agreement processing: An ERP study of adults and children. Colloquium at University of Alberta Linguistics Department. 2 June 2015. Edmonton Canada: University of Alberta.

Dube, S., Kung, C., Varghese, P., & Demuth, K. (2015). Perceptual salience matters for L2 processing of subject-verb agreement: ERP evidence from advanced Mandarin learners of English. Australian Linguistic Society (ALS) Annual Conference. 9-11 December 2015. Sydney: Western Sydney University.

Dube, S., Kung, C., Varghese, P., Brock, J., & Demuth, K. (2015). Omission or commission, does it matter? Subject-verb agreement processing in L1 and L2 adults. 10th International Symposium on Bilingualism (ISB10). 20-24 May 2015. New Jersey USA: Rutgers University.

Floyd, S., Rossi, G., Baranova, J., Blythe, J., Dingemanse, M., Kendrick, K. H., Enfield, N. J. (2015). Thanks or no thanks? Third position as a locus of cultural variation in request sequences. International Pragmatics Association, Antwerp.

Gerber, L. (2015). "It seems to be what the professionals recommend": Parental discourses on the one person-one language approach in online parental advice forums. Bilingualism Symposium - Theory, Practice and Innovation: Social, Cognitive and Linguistic Perspectives in the Study of Bilingualism. 5 June 2015. Sydney: University of New South Wales.

Gilliver, M., Cupples, L., Ching, T. Y. C., & Leigh, G. (2015). PA proficiency in pre-schoolers with hearing loss: PA program proves productive in promoting performance. Paper presented at the Twenty-Second Annual Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading, The Big Island, Hawaii.

Grey, A. (2015). Double Domination: New directions for inclusion and identity created by the Putonghua-English diglossia domination of minority languages in China.  British Association of Applied Linguistics Conference. 3-5 September 2015, Birmingham: Aston University.

Grey, A. (2015). The Decoupling of Ethnic Identity and Language Practices among China's Minority Youths. Sociolinguistics of Globalization Conference. 3-6 June 2015. Kong Kong: Hong Kong University.

Grey, A. (2015). The displacement of language as a mechanism of social inclusion in processes of language endangerment: the Zhuang case study. Fifth Cambridge Conference on Language Endangerment. 31 July 2015. Cambridge: University of Cambridge.

Grey, A. (2015). Urbanisation and minority language in China: a case study of urban, upwardly mobile and language-less Zhuang people. Australian Linguistics Society Conference. 9-11 December 2015. Sydney: Western Sydney University.

Hiew, W. (2015). ProELT: The issues and impact of a teacher professional development. International Association of Teachers of English as a Foreign Language Conference. 11-14 April 2015. Manchester, United Kingdom.

Holt, R. & Proctor, M. (2015). Acoustic characteristics of oral clicks in Zimbabwean Ndebele: A preliminary case study. Australian Linguistics Society Conference. 9-11 Dec. 2015. Sydney: Western Sydney University.

Hussain, M. & A. Szakay (2015) The perceptual salience of speech rhythm in Multicultural London English. Paper presented at the 10th UK Language Variation and Change Conference (UKLVC10). York, UK, September 2015.

Hussain, Q., & Mustafa, H. (2015, August). Do Punjabi geminates show loooooong-distance anticipatory effects? Poster presented at the satellite workshop on Geminate Consonants Across the World, International Congress of Phonetic Sciences. 12 August, 2015. Glasgow UK: University of Glasgow.

Hussain, Q., Harvey, M., & Demuth, K. (2015). Incorporation of English coda alveolar stops as retroflexes in Punjabi. Poster presented at the Australian Linguistic Society (ALS) Annual Conference. 9-11 December 2015. Sydney: Western Sydney University.

Keidser, G., Best, V., Freeston, K., Buchholz, J. M. (2015). A new paradigm for measuring speech communication abilities in the laboratory. Ageing and Speech Communication research conference, Indiana, USA.

Keidser, G., Best, V., Freeston, K., Buchholz, J. M. (2015). Cognitive factors in the comprehension of dynamic conversations. Int. Conf. on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHScom), Linköping, Sweden

Khoo, K. M. (2015). Cohesion of Self in Therapeutic Conversation Examined through Cohesive Harmony and a 'Science of Poetics'. Australian Systemic Functional Linguistics Association Conference. Brisbane Sep 29-1 Oct 2015. University of Queensland, Brisbane. [Presenter: Butt, D. G.]

Khoo, K. M. (2015). Cohesion and Self in the Therapeutic Conversation. 42nd International Systemic Functional Congress. July 27-31 2015. RWTH Aachen University, Aachen.

Khoo, K. M. & Butt, D. G. (2015). A Linguistic Approach to Poetics and Cohesion of Self in Therapeutic Conversation. Australian and New Zealand Association for Psychotherapy Conference. August 6-9 2015. Sydney. Available via psychevisual.

Kruger, H. (2015). Translation and the intersection of social and cognitive aspects of bilingualism. Bilingualism Symposium - Theory, Practice and Innovation: Social, Cognitive and Linguistic Perspectives in the Study of Bilingualism. 5 June 2015. Sydney: University of New South Wales.

Kruger, H., & Van Rooy, B. (2015). Editorial practice and the distinction between error and conventionalised innovation in New Englishes: A corpus-based investigation of Black South African English. ICAME 36. Pre-conference workshop: Corpus Linguistics and Linguistic Innovations in Non-Native Englishes. 27-31 May. Trier: University of Trier.

Kruger, H., & Van Rooy, B. (2015). Word order of reporting and reported clauses in language-contact situations: A comparison of translated English and ESL writing. ICAME 36. 27-31 May 2015. Trier: University of Trier.

Kruger, J. L., Doherty, S, Soto-Sanfiel, M. & Ibrahim, R. (2015) Towards a cognitive audiovisual translatology: Subtitles and embodied cognition. Fourth Translation Process Research Workshop. 15-17 January 2015. Las Palmas, Spain.

Kruger, J. L., Doherty, S, Soto-Sanfiel, M. & Ibrahim, R. (2015) Measuring psychological immersion in the presence of SLS: EEG beta coherence and subjective self-reports. Linguistics Society of Southern Africa conference.  24-26 June 2015. Potchefstroom, South Africa.

Kruger, J. L., Doherty, S & Soto-Sanfiel. (2015) Psychological immersion in a foreign language: The effect of same-language subtitles on English foreign language viewers. 6th Media for All Conference, 16-18 September 2015. WSU, Sydney.

Kung, C., Xu Rattanasone, N., Schmidt, E., & Demuth, K. (2015). Not voiced, not released, not perceived: Mandarin learners' perception of English oral-stop codas. Australian Linguistic Society (ALS) Conference. 9-11 December 2015. Sydney: Western Sydney University.

Layton-Caisley, P. G. (2015). Talking-Walking Avenue to Literacy: Oral scientific description and its graphic representation as potential breakthrough activities for underachieving primary schoolchildren.  AATE/ALEA Joint National Conference. 3-6 July 2015. Canberra, ACT.

Liardét, C.L.  (2015). 'As we all know': Decoding Chinese EFL learners' use of interpersonal grammatical metaphor.  Paper presented at the International Systemic Functional Linguistics Conference (ISFC), July 2015, Aachen Germany.

Liardét, C.L., & Black, S.  (2015). 'So and so' says, states and argues: An engagement analysis of university learners' use of reporting verbs.  Paper presented at the International Systemic Functional Linguistics Conference (ISFC), July 2015, Aachen Germany.

Lo, C. Y., McMahon, C. M., Looi, V., & Thompson, W. F. (2015). Melodic Contour Training and Its Effect on Speech in Noise, Consonant Discrimination, and Prosody Perception for Cochlear Implant Recipients. Confluence. 9 December 2015. Sydney: Western Sydney University.

Lum, J., and Benson, P. (2015). Helping HDR students stay on track with writing. Association of Academic Language and Learning (AAL) 12th Biennial Conference. 25-27 November 2015. University of Wollongong.

McMahon, C., Boisvert, I., Ibrahim, R., de Lissa, P., Miles, K., Chen, F., Lyxell, B. (2015). Changes in alpha oscillations in normal hearing adults and in adult cochlear implant users during a speech-in-noise task, 3rd International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, Linkoping, Sweden.

Mealings, K., Demuth, K., Buchholz, J. M., Dillon, H. (2015). An assessment of different sized open plan and enclosed kindergarten classroom listening environments. Meeting of the Australian Acoustical Society, Hunter Valley, Australia.

Miles, K., McMahon, C.M., Boisvert, I., Ibrahim, R., de Lissa, P., Lyxell, B. (2015). Effect of adverse listening conditions and cognitive processes on pupil dilation and the alpha oscillatory network, 3rd International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, Linkoping, Sweden.

Murray, J. (2015). A qualitative study of pragmatic competence and migrant identity in the Greek diaspora. 14th International Pragmatics Conference, Antwerp Belgium. (Poster presentation).

Murray, J. (2015). Im/politeness and migrant identity in the Greek diaspora, 9th international im/politeness conference University of Athens, Greece.

Nishioka, H. (2015). Learning language with Web 2.0 is so difficult!!! Voices from Japanese language learners at a South Korean University. Exploring Japan through New Lenses: Emerging Themes in Japanese Studies. 26 September 2015. Melbourne. Monash University.

Nishioka, H. (2015). Learning to write in Japanese at an online community for language learners-Lang-8 project at a South Korean college. Japanese Studies Association of Australian Conference 2015. 30 June-3 July, 2015. Melbourne, Latrobe University.

Nishioka, H. (2015). Learning to write in online community for language learners. JALT CALL 2015. June 5-7, 2015. Fukuoka, Kyushu Sangyo University.

Penney, J., Cox, F., Palethorpe, S., & Miles, K. (2015). Glottalisation in Australian English: A change in progress. Australian Linguistics Society Conference. 9-11 December 2015. Sydney: Western Sydney University.

Peters, P. (2015). The variability of strong verb past forms in C21 English. Paper presented at the 36th ICAME Conference (27-31 May) in Trier, Germany

Peters, P., & Smith A. (2015). Australian style: Directions 2015.  Paper presented at the Australian Conference for Editors, Indexers and Publishing Professionals (6-9 May) in Canberra, ACT.

Piller, I. (2015). Linguistic diversity and social justice. Invited keynote lecture at Bilingualism Symposium, University of New South Wales, June 05, 2015

Riazi, M. (2015). An investigation into the genres and textual features of assessed writing in postgraduate coursework programs in three disciplines across four universities in NSW. TESOL Research Network Colloquium, 5 September. Sydney: University of Sydney.

Riazi, M., & Murray, J. (2015). The "what" and the "how" of writing academic assignments at Australian universities. Symposium of Second Language Writing. 18-21 November 2015. Auckland: Auckland University of Technology.

San, N., M. Proctor, M. Turpin, M. Harvey, K. Ringbauer, A. Ross & K. Demuth (2015). An acoustic analysis of Kaytetye vowel variability. Australian Linguistics Society Conference. 9-11 Dec. 2015. Sydney: Western Sydney University.

Schmidt, E., de Lissa, P., Kung, C. (2015). Challenges in the study of prosody in silent reading. ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders (CCD) Annual Workshop. 16-19 November 2015. Sydney: Macquarie University.

Schmidt, E., Kung, C., Post, B., Yuen, I., & Demuth, K. (2015). The processing of question and statement rises by Mandarin Learners of English. Australian Linguistic Society (ALS) Annual Conference. 9-11 December 2015. Sydney: Western Sydney University.

Schmidt, E., Post, B., Kung, C., Yuen, I., & Demuth, K. (2015) Gender biases in the perception of statement- and question-rises in Australian English. Phonetics and Phonology in Europe (PaPE). 29-30 June 2015. Cambridge: Cambridge University.

Smith-Khan, L. (2015). Fair go? Communication and credibility in Australian asylum procedures (Language and Migration Workshop). Australian Linguistics Society Conference. 9-11 December 2015. Sydney: Western Sydney University.

Szakay, A. (2015) Socio-indexical information is processed relatively late during speech perception. Paper presented at he 46th Annual Conference of the Australian Linguistic Society. Sydney, Australia, December 2015.

Szakay, A. & E. Torgersen (2015) Voice quality differences in London English: The effect of gender and ethnicity. Paper presented at the Phonology of Contemporary English (PAC) 2015. Toulouse, France, April 2015.

Tilney, M. (2015). Theories of Prominence. Australian Systemic Functional Linguistics Association Conference. 29 September-1 October 2015. Brisbane: University of Queensland.

Torgersen, E. & A. Szakay (2015) An analysis of VOT in London English. Paper presented at the 8th International Conference on Language Variation in Europe (ICLaVE8). Leipzig, Germany, May 2015.

Tsukada, K., Cox, F. and Hajek, J. (2015). The perception of unfamiliar Italian and Japanese consonant length contrasts by monolingual and bilingual speakers, Bilingualism Symposium - Theory, Practice and Innovation: Social, Cognitive and Linguistic Perspectives in the Study of Bilingualism, University of NSW, June 5.

Tsukada, K., Cox, F., Hajek, J. & Hirata, Y. (2015) Non-native Japanese learners' perception of consonant length in Italian and Japanese. Paper presented at the Australian Linguistic Society Conference, Sydney, December 2015.

Van Dun, B., Ching, T., Wong, C., Xu Rattanasone, N., Bardy, F., Zhang, V., Sharma, M., Dillon, H., Demuth, K., & Rance, G. (2015). Assessment of infant speech discrimination using the acoustic change complex, a response from the auditory cortex. Workshop on Infant Speech Perception (WISP): Phonological and Lexical Development. 1-2 September 2015. Sydney: Macquarie University.

Van Rooy, B. & Kruger, H. (2015). Word order of reporting and reported clauses in language-contact situations: A comparison of translated English and ESL writing. ICAME 36. University of Trier. Trier, 27-31 May.  

Van Rooy, B., & Kruger, H. (2015). A corpus-based analysis of the construction network of verb complement clauses in Afrikaans. 13th International Cognitive Linguistics Conference (ICLC). Theme session: Corpus Methods and Cognitive Linguistics. 20-25 July 2015. Newcastle: Northumbria University.

Van Rooy, B., & Kruger, H. (2015). Language variation, contact, and prescription: Reported speech in Afrikaans. LSSA/SAALA/SAALT joint annual conference. 24-26 June 2015. Potchefstroom: North-West University.

Wiebusch, F. & Gormley, L. (2015). Peer Partnerships: a fresh perspective on teachers observing teachers. English Australia Conference. 25-28 September 2015. Brisbane: Hilton Hotel.

Xu Rattanasone, N., Demuth, K., & Cox, F. (2015, May). Production of English plurals by 3-year-old monolingual and Mandarin L2-learners of English. Paper presented at the 10th International Symposium on Bilingualism (ISB10), Rutgers University, New Jersey, USA.

Yates, L. & Dahm, M. (2015). Pragmatics in action: Strategies for doctors and medical educators. 14th International Pragmatics Conference. Antwerp, Belgium, 26-31 July 2015.

Yates, L. & Kozar, O. (2015). Age and language learning in migration. Paper presented to Bilingualism Symposium: Theory, Practice and Innovation: Social, Cognitive and Linguistic Perspectives in the Study of Bilingualism. 5 June 2015, UNSW, Sydney.

Yates, L. and Wang, J. (2015). A qualitative look at the multiple factors impacting English language learning post-migration. Bilingualism Symposium: Theory, Practice and Innovation: Social, Cognitive and Linguistic Perspectives in the Study of Bilingualism, 5 June 2015. UNSW, Sydney

Ying, J., J. Shaw, D. Derrick, C. Best & M. Proctor (2015). Articulatory variation in /Vl/ transitions within and across syllable boundaries. Australian Linguistics Society Conference. 9-11 Dec. 2015. Sydney: Western Sydney University.

Yuen I., Cox, F. & Demuth, K. (2015) Planning of inserted 'r' in the speech of Australian English-speaking children, Paper presented at the Australian Linguistic Society Conference, Sydney, December 2015.

Yuen, I., Xu Rattanasone, N., Schmidt, E., & Demuth, K. (2015). Can 6-year-olds use prosodic cues to disambiguate compounds from non-compounds? Phonetics and Phonology in Europe (PaPE). 29-30 June 2015. Cambridge: Cambridge University.

Other: New edition of book

Fromkin, V., Rodman, R., Hyams, N., Collins, P., Amberber, M. & Cox, F. (2015) An Introduction to Language, 8th Edition, Cengage, Melbourne.

Other: Translation

Bigocheukki, L.S. (Vygotsky, L.S.) (2015). Bigocheukki Adonghak Kangoui I ("Lectures on Pedology Volume I") Bigocheukki Seonjib 6 ("Volume 6 of the Collected Works of Vygotsky"). Translated by the Vygotsky Community (David Kellogg, Kim Yongho, Yi Miyeong, Kweon Minsuk, Yi Dongpyo, Choe Yeongmi, and Kim Yeosun). Seoul: Salimteo.

Other: Non-conference presentations

Butt, D. G. (2015) Biological value, semantic value, and psychotherapeutic value. Grand Rounds Talk at Westmead Hospital

Butt, D. G. (2015) "Can there be a natural science of meaning?" The linguistic legacy of Ferdinand de Saussure (1857-1913) in our era of information and neurosciences. Key Concepts in the Human Sciences. Macquarie University

Butt, D. G. (2015) Form and function in the linguistics of Ruqaiya Hasan. Sun Yat-sen University

Other: Published abstracts

Mealings, K. T., Buchholz, J., Demuth, K., & Dillon, H. (2015). An investigation into the acoustics of different sized open plan and enclosed Kindergarten classrooms [Abstract]. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 137(4), 2392-2392.

Mealings, K. T., Demuth, K., Buchholz, J., & Dillon, H. (2015). An investigation into how the acoustics of different sized open plan classrooms affects speech perception in Kindergarten children. [Abstract] The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 137, 2433-2433.

Other: chapters in reference works

Kruger, H. and Van Rooy, B. Afrikaans finite declarative complement clauses: Construction forms. Taalportaal: The Linguistics of Dutch, Frisian and Afrikaans Online. http://www.taalportaal.org/taalportaal/topic/pid/topic-14295917758711433. (Beta version published 1 June 2015.)

Van Rooy, B. & Kruger, H. Afrikaans verb complement clauses: Overview. Taalportaal: The Linguistics of Dutch, Frisian and Afrikaans Online. http://www.taalportaal.org/taalportaal/topic/pid/topic-14280541044064336. (Beta version published 1 June 2015.)

Other: Research reports

Yates, L., Terraschke, A., Zielinski, B., Pryor, E., Wang, J., Major, G., Radhakrishnan, M.,  Middleton, H., Chisari, M. and Williams Tetteh, V. (2015). Final report:  AMEP Longitudinal Study 2011-2014.

Other: Guest editorship of journal special issues

Alcon, E.S. and Yates, L. (Jan 2015). Joint guest editor, 'Pragmatics learning across contexts', special issue for System journal.