Conference report: FIT 2017 Disruption and diversification

Conference report: FIT 2017 Disruption and diversification

Eisa Asiri 

The 2017 FIT World Congress was held from 3-5 August 2017 at the Convention and Exhibition Centre, Brisbane, Australia. It was hosted by the Australian Institute of Interpreters and Translators (AUSIT), in conjunction with the Australian Sign Language Interpreters’ Association (ASLIA). The theme of this congress was “Disruption and diversification”, which allowed the more than 600 delegates (including academics, translators, interpreters, and terminologists) from around the world to discuss numerous issues specifically related to the disruptive and diversified nature of translation and interpretation professions.

Delegates presented new and inspiring ideas in relation to numerous areas, including the impact of technology on translation and interpretation, globalisation, language and conflict, community interpreting and translation, localisation as genre, ethical roles of translators, status of the translation and interpretation profession, and new models in translation and interpretation research. The FIT executive committee announced that the next congress will be held in Cuba in 2020.

It was a fascinating experience to attend this congress, and to meet translation and interpretation experts from different parts of the world. I enjoyed the variety of topics presented by the speakers. It was particularly exciting to be able to present a poster, titled “Translation ethics in Saudi Arabia: A survey of translators’ perceptions”.This poster was taken from my Master of Research thesis, which was completed in June 2016, under the supervision of Dr Haidee Kruger.

My poster presented the results of a survey investigating translation ethics with reference to the professional translation context in Saudi Arabia. Translation is a fast-developing industry in Saudi Arabia, and yet there is no code of ethics available to guide the translation process. My research suggests that while a future code of ethics for translation in Saudi Arabia will be able to draw on existing codes of ethics for translation, the interplay between professional ethics, personal ethics, and activist ethics is a matter that will require more attention in this particular context.

I would like to extend my thanks to the Saudi Arabian Cultural Mission (SACM) for supporting me financially to participate in this congress.

Eisa Asiri

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