How building your child’s spoken word bank can boost their capacity to read

How building your child’s spoken word bank can boost their capacity to read

Cognitive Science PhD candidate Signy Wegener and Distinguished Professor Anne Castles are featured in both The Conversation and ABC News for their amazing research in showing that the expectation of how a word should look can help a child process orally familiar words.

Children’s oral vocabulary – their knowledge of the sounds and meanings of words – is strongly positively associated with their reading all the way through school. Understanding this relationship is important for making children’s reading as strong as possible.

Our new research has pointed to one mechanism underlying this association: when primary school children know a spoken word, they form an expectation of what that word should look like when it is written down – and they do this even if they have never seen it before.

Using eye-tracking technology, we demonstrated that these expectations can help children to process orally familiar words more quickly when they read them for the first time...

Click here to read the complete article in The Conversation.

Click here to read the full article in ABC News online. 

Image source: Jo Stephan, Macquarie University

Content owner: Department of Cognitive Science Last updated: 31 Jul 2017 9:29am

Back to the top of this page