Philosophy Society, history and languages

Philosophy Society, history and languages

What is the human mind? Do we have free will? What is race and does it matter? Philosophy asks, and seeks answers to, fundamental questions about human life and enquiry.

At Macquarie you’ll develop critical thinking and reasoning skills in one of the top Philosophy departments in Australasia. Philosophical knowledge and skills prepare you for a wide range of careers.

Local

Undergraduate Courses

Degree 2017 ATAR
Bachelor of Arts with a major in Philosophy 75.00

Postgraduate Courses

Degree 2017 ATAR
Bachelor of Philosophy/Master of Research (Arts) N/A

International

Undergraduate Courses

Degree 2017 ATAR
Bachelor of Arts with a major in Philosophy 75.00

Postgraduate Courses

Degree 2017 ATAR
Master of Research (Arts) N/A

Careers in philosophy

  • advocacy and welfare officer
  • business administrator
  • business ethics consultant
  • communications assistant
  • entrepreneur
  • journalist
  • lawyer (with further study)
  • lobbyist
  • media producer
  • mediator
  • policy consultant
  • politician
  • recruiter
  • social media coordinator
  • social or market researcher

Professional experience

At Macquarie, learning doesn't just happen in the classroom. Our unique PACE program provides real-world industry experience locally, regionally, internationally so you can get ahead in the career queue.

Through PACE, study a range of philosophical texts that open your eyes to how your studies in philosophy have prepared you for further study and work. Explore how the skills and values you've developed, creative thought, critical thinking, problem solving and intellectual humility, can be used in the workplace to make change in the world.

No matter what you decide to study at Macquarie, PACE has an opportunity available for you. Learn more about the opportunities available through PACE.

Our expertise in philosophy

Dr Jennifer Duke-Yonge

Dr Jennifer Duke-Yonge

Lecturer

Jennifer is a highly awarded and well respected academic who has recently received a prestigious national award for outstanding contributions to student learning by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council. She worked in Philosophy at Macquarie in a number of roles, mainly on the development and teaching of Critical Thinking, before joining the Department of Philosophy in her current position in 2004. She teaches in areas such as critical thinking, formal logic and epistemology.

"The study of Philosophy, and study in the Faculty of Arts generally, challenges students to open themselves to new ideas. One of the most rewarding things about teaching at Macquarie is seeing our students meet that challenge: developing a commitment to knowledge and really engaging with the process of learning."

See Dr Duke-Yonge's full profile

Macquarie University Centre for Agency, Values and Ethics

The Macquarie University Centre for Agency, Values and Ethics (CAVE) provides a platform for interaction and collaboration between researchers in philosophy, psychology, cognitive science, law, medicine, applied ethics and bioethics. A distinctive feature is its focus upon the philosophical, ethical and legal issues raised by the cognitive neurosciences.

Learn more about CAVE

Study philosophy at Macquarie 

Philosophy at Macquarie encompasses a diversity of philosophical approaches which equip students with a range of analytical and creative skills. All our teaching, whether in traditional face-to-face or distance modes, is informed by a commitment to create positive learning environments in which students can become aware of and develop their talents for philosophy.

By studying philosophy at Macquarie you will gain:

  • Knowledge: Understanding of some central concepts, theories and arguments in many philosophical traditions and fields of inquiry
  • Skills: Critical thinking and reasoning skills, problem solving skills, creative skills, and communication skills
  • Philosophical values, and social and ethical values

What is philosophy?

Philosophy is both a subject and a way of thinking.

As a subject, philosophy asks, and seeks to answer, fundamental questions about many areas of human life and inquiry. These include questions about the relationship between the mind and the body; the existence of God; the nature of human fulfilment and alienation; the status of moral beliefs and aesthetic judgements; the nature of knowledge; and the relationship between the world and our concepts and modes of reasoning.

Philosophers are also concerned with contemporary social and political issues, such as:

  • economic inequality
  • the environmental crisis
  • gender relations
  • animal welfare
  • Indigenous rights

As a way of thinking, philosophy puts an emphasis on thinking for yourself rather than relying on someone else’s authority. By studying philosophy, you learn how to think for yourself better: to reflect on your views, to give reasons for them, and to understand and evaluate other positions and arguments. The kind of thinking developed by the study of philosophy is important in many different professional contexts, which is why philosophy graduates enjoy good employability.

Philosophy Major

Through the Major in Philosophy students will become skilled in the art of philosophical questioning, the construction of philosophical arguments, and the evaluation of philosophical beliefs. Students will be able to choose from a wide variety of courses that cover a plurality of internationally relevant philosophical traditions and fields of enquiry, including logic, theory of knowledge, philosophy of science, metaphysics, philosophy of mind, philosophy of religion, phenomenology and existential philosophy, aesthetics, social philosophy, ethics and applied ethics. The Philosophy major will develop creative thinking, communication and problem-solving skills which are invaluable in all professions today.

Philosophy Minor and Philosophy Electives

A 'Minor' is 12 distinct credit points from an approved Major, including 6 distinct credit points at 300-level. A Minor is an excellent way of completing your Major area of study with an interesting and useful program of study.

Many of our students take Philosophy units in order to help them excel in other areas of specialisation. Studying philosophy enhances your critical thinking skills, your ability to analyse and construct arguments, your ability to comprehend complex ideas, and your capacity to communicate clearly and persuasively.

Here are some suggestions for Minors in Philosophy that are compatible with Majors in other disciplines: Psychology Major with a Minor in Philosophy; Law Major with a Minor in Philosophy; Science/Computing Major with a Minor in Philosophy; Sociology Major with a Minor in Philosophy; Education Major with a Minor in Philosophy.

You can study individual Philosophy units without taking the major or minor in Philosophy. Many students simply take one or two Philosophy units to complement the rest of their degree. For example, our units in social philosophy and ethics go well with units in law, politics and economics; our units in logic and philosophy of language go well with units in computing and mathematics.

You will be able to choose from a wide variety of courses that cover a plurality of internationally relevant philosophical traditions and fields of enquiry, including logic, theory of knowledge, philosophy of science, metaphysics, philosophy of mind, philosophy of religion, phenomenology and existential philosophy, aesthetics, social philosophy, ethics and applied ethics. The Philosophy major will develop creative thinking, communication and problem-solving skills which are invaluable in all professions today.

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