Journalism Media, creative arts, and communication

Journalism Media, creative arts, and communication

Today’s journalism is virtually unrecognisable from that of even a decade ago.

At Macquarie you’ll gain an edge in the changing media landscape with an an in-depth knowledge of fundamental and new journalism practices including social media, data journalism and entrepreneurship. Taught by award-winning media producers and research academics, you’ll also get access to practical industry experience.

Careers in journalism 

  • journalist (print, television, radio or online)
  • broadcaster
  • content coordinator/producer
  • copywriter
  • editor
  • corporate communications specialist
  • multimedia producer

Professional experience

Student experience

Chloe Braithwaite

Chloé Braithwaite

Master of Future Journalism

“I chose to study the Master of Future Journalism at Macquarie because although my background is in neuroscience and psychology, I want to develop my career towards becoming a science communicator in a research organisation. I chose this program because it covers all aspects of media. The smaller classes provide me with a more personalised experience and the program allows for a lot of practical experiences using the state-of-the-art facilities."

"When I complete my degree I will have experience in both software and hardware that are the industry standard, which will give me an edge in an already competitive field.”

Our expertise in journalism

Professor Catharine Lumby

Professor Catharine Lumby

Professor in media

Professor Lumby is an active researcher and teacher in the fields of social media and online journalism. In her two decades as a journalist she worked for the Sydney Morning Herald, the ABC and The Bulletin magazine.

“The Master of Future Journalism is one of the most exciting degrees I have been involved in designing. It is focused on the future of journalism and communications and in giving students contemporary real-world skills to cope with a rapidly changing media environment.”

Our facilities

Futures Lab

The Futures Lab represents the most significant investment in online media production to date by an Australian university. Built specifically for Master of Future Journalism students, the Futures Lab mirrors the platforms and systems in use by major broadcasters and online media outlets internationally. It includes a green screen TV studio with remote controlled cameras, lighting and auto cue; Tricaster vision mixer with virtual sets; iNews newsroom management system; an integrated automated social media delivery system; Avid MediaCentral and Interplay media collaboration tools, with back end support from an AVID ISIS 5500 network media storage system. This allows for network integrated production workflows that reflect current professional industry practices. The Futures Lab is a central hub that is connected to all Screen, Music, Radio, and Performance production facilities.

Discover media, music, communication and cultural studies at Macquarie

In the home of Australia's first media department, you'll learn from award-winning experts and have access to industry-standard facilities, including our multi-million-dollar media hub with professional screen, radio and dance studios, as well as state-of-the-art digital workstations for all production areas. Immerse yourself in writing, dance, music, screen production, management, games design or communication, and set yourself up for a career in the new media landscape.

Macquarie University unveils the Futures Lab, a real-world teaching and broadcast facility purpose built for the new professionally focused programs Master of Creative Media and Master of Future Journalism.

In the Futures Lab opening event, Professor John Simons, former Executive Dean of Faculty of Arts at Macquarie, says the Futures Lab is not just a new space.

"This is an important development for [Macquarie University]. It's not only a new space. It's set up to serve a new academic program that tries to address the perhaps paradoxical situation by which traditional media outlets are actually in some way shrinking while the amount of journalism is actually growing."

"What we're really trying to do here is to address the issues of the employability of advanced journalists in this new situation," Simons added.

The Master of Creative Media and Master of Future Journalism programs address the challenges of contemporary media landscape by preparing students for a career in the rapidly evolving media industry. Students will learn about the new practices and innovation that is happening in digital production and journalism so they are equipped to create their own career pathways. They will have opportunity to network with industry experts, and have access to state-of-the-art creative and performing arts facilities at Macquarie's Y3A media hub.

Associate Professor Mark Evans, former Head of the Department of Media, Music, Communication and Cultural Studies (MMCCS) at Macquarie, says the Futures Lab represents the most significant investment in online media production to date by an Australian university.

Evans adds, "The Futures Lab is a major online digital media production facility that represents the latest in networked digital media production technologies. This state-of-the-art facility mirrors the platforms and systems in use by major broadcasters and online media outlets internationally."

Some of the high technology equipment installed in the Futures Lab are:

  • AVID ISIS 5500 network media system with 4 x 64TB of high speed storage
  • Avid MediaCentral and Interplay Production, allowing for comprehensive digital workflow management, remote media editing and voice over recording, incoming news feed management, and news scripting from remote laptops and tablets
  • A green screen TV studio with remote controlled cameras and lighting and auto cue
  • Tricaster vision mixer with virtual sets
  • iNews newsroom management system
  • A media server integrated social media delivery system

Learn more about the Futures Lab and Macquarie's other media facilities

Three reasons to choose media, creative arts and communication at Macquarie

  1. You will learn the skills required to respond to a rapidly evolving media environment
  2. We have strong media-industry ties and a growing internship program
  3. You will gain vocational skills through access to our industry-standard technology

Our programs are designed to keep you up-to-date with emerging media and industry practices while ensuring you have a strong understanding of traditional mass communication.

In the home of Australia’s first media department, you’ll learn from award-winning experts and have access to industry-standard facilities, including our multi-million-dollar media hub with professional screen, radio and dance studios, as well as state-of-the-art digital workstations for all production areas.

Immerse yourself in writing, dance, music, screen production, management, games design or communication, and set yourself up for a career in the new media landscape.

As the nature of the workplace changed in the last decade, so has the skill set demanded by employers.

"Skills that commanded a premium yesterday are no longer so valuable today. Organisations now need people who can operate in multiple dimensions, who have the ability to analyse information, prioritise and communicate with stakeholders. These sophisticated 'soft skills' are among the hardest to measure but ultimately can deliver the greatest value," states the 2012 Hudson Report.

We are seeing employers becoming more aware of the value in creating an employee base that has a good mix of both technically educated employees and broadly educated employees.

An interesting example of this is where one of the largest producers of semiconductors in the world employs an anthropologist as their Director of User Experience Research. Overseeing a team of social scientists and designers who travel the world, observing how people use technology in their lives, the team's findings help inform the company's product development process. The ability to interpret the market and identify the emerging signals and what is going to matter to the end user takes a special skill set recognised in the field of anthropology.

The Arts advantage

Amongst the many benefits of studying an Arts degree such as expanding your knowledge base across several subjects, a key benefit is developing skills sought by employers such as learning to effectively write and communicate, teamwork, problem-solving, critical thinking and independent judgement.

Graduate Careers Australia in their 2013 Graduate Outlook Report ranked the most important selection criteria across several industries when recruiting graduates. The results in the table below show that 2 out of the top 3 selection criteria are developed when studying Arts: interpersonal and communication skills (written and oral); and critical reasoning and analytical skills/problem solving/lateral thinking/technical skills.

Throughout their university education, Arts students develop many skills sought after by employers including:

  • Ability to perform research: The ability to find information and analyse and assess its quality is seen as an asset.
  • Interpersonal skills: The ability to collaborate and communicate effectively within a team is highly valued and something Arts students learn as a part of their studies.
  • Creativity: Being able to think outside the box and see the big picture and apply this to the problem-solving process can set an Arts graduate apart from graduates in other fields.
  • Critical thinking and analysis: Being able to think objectively by looking at things from different angles and to question what has been presented as fact to ensure true conclusions are formed, is a greatly valued skill.
  • Effective communication: An Arts degree supports a student in becoming a skilful writer and presenter, and this ability is valued across most careers.

With this mix of skills, the Arts graduate can support their employer in responding to today's global, social, cultural and economic challenges along with their specialist knowledge of the people, societies and cultures that underline these challenges.

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