Research Enrichment Program

Research Enrichment Program

One key aim of the Genes to Geoscience Research Enrichment Program (GGREP) is for researchers to encounter new research questions and possibilities across a wider range of fields than just in their own lab. They will then be better prepared to take the lead as new cross-discipline fields emerge. The second key aim is for researchers to learn useful skills, at higher standard and more efficiently than by self-education.

To sign up for masterclasses, workshops or modules, please click on the registration link associated with each offering. For non-MQU researchers, please register your interest here: g2g-admin@mq.edu.au

For questions and additional information, please feel free to contact us at: g2g-admin@mq.edu.au


GGREP Menu of Masterclasses and Workshops for 2016

Click on the name of each offering to find out more information and to register. 

Masterclass, Workshop or Module name Convener Days Date
FoS&E Tutor inductionBishop124/2/2016 & 25/2/2015 (afternoons; 2-5pm)
Introduction to R Allen, Madin, Nipperess & Kosnik 1 16/3/2016
Graphing and data manipulation in R Allen, Madin, Nipperess & Kosnik 1 23/3/2016
Statistics in R Allen, Madin, Nipperess & Kosnik 1 6/4/2016

Academic writing and communication

Gillings & Brown

1

5/4/2016

Accelerating your research with digital data collection

Sobotkova, Ross, & Ballsun-Stanton

0.5 

26/4/2016
(afternoon; 1-3pm)
Bioinformatics: A Hands-On Introduction Hallinan, Sofronov & Kordzajkia 0.5

1/7/2016
(morning; 9am-12)

FoS&E Tutor inductionBishop113/7/2016 & 14/7/2015 (mornings; 9:30am - 12)
GG Outlook conference Gillings 226/7/2016 & 27/7/2016
Transition from PhD to Early Career Researcher Power & contributors 125/8/2016
Detecting signals of environmental selection in population genomics Dudaniec & Rymer 1

1/9/2016

Trait Ecology

Leishman, Westoby, Wright, Conrwell, & Falster 2 8/9/2016 & 15/9/2016
Non-academic jobs following a PhD Lanfear, Purcell, & Lin-Stephens 1 22/9/2016
42 shades of leadership Herberstein & contributors 0.5 11/10/2016
(afternoon; 2-5pm) 

Faculty of Science and Engineering Tutor Induction 

One-day equivalent workshop running over the afternoons (2-5pm) of Wednesday the 24th and Thursday the 25th February. Organised by Melanie Bishop, this workshop has been expanded to all tutors in the Faculty of Science and Engineering.

This workshop is designed to enhance your confidence in, and develop your awareness of, issues in teaching small groups (such as in a prac classes or tutorials). Topics covered will include: effective questioning, encouraging equal participation, managing student behaviour, and giving and receiving feedback. This workshop will be of interest to new and experienced tutors alike. 

Registrations have closed for this workshop

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Introduction to R

Wednesday 16 March (9am – 4pm). Organized by Drew Allen, Josh Madin, David Nipperess, and Matthew Kosnik. Academics and postdocs welcome. You will need to bring your own laptop capable of wireless connection. Participant numbers will be capped (first-in secures a place).

At this session we’ll begin by interacting with the program at a very basic level to become familiar with the R programming environment. We will cover a number of topics including how to import data into R, the various kinds of data that R is capable of handling, the syntax of the R programming language, how to manipulate these data using basic programming functions, and how to write functions. No programming skills will be assumed for this first day.

Please note that tea breaks will be catered, but not lunch. Participants will need to make their own arrangements for lunch.

Click here to register for 'Introduction to R'

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Graphing and data manipulation in R

Wednesday 23 March (9am – 4pm). Organised by Drew Allen, Josh Madin, David Nipperess, and Matthew Kosnik. Academics and postdocs welcome. You will need to bring your own laptop capable of wireless connection. Participant numbers will be capped (first-in secures a place).

R is capable of producing publication-quality graphics from your data. R can also be used to manipulate your data into a variety of useful forms. On this day, we will cover two topics. First, in the morning, we will cover commonly used graphing procedures in R. Such procedures are helpful not only for producing graphs, but also for exploring data and for interpreting results of statistical procedures. Second, in the afternoon, we will cover data manipulation, considering in some detail the issue of inputting data into R and then transforming data so that they are in a format suitable for statistical analysis. Attendance at the 'INTRODUCTION TO R' module (Wednesday the 16th March) is a prerequisite for attending the GRAPHING & DATA MANIPULATION IN R module unless the attendee has prior experience in R.

Please note that tea breaks will be catered, but not lunch. Participants will need to make their own arrangements for lunch.

Click here to register for 'Graphing and data manipulation in R'

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Statistics in R

Wednesday 6 April (9am – 4pm). Organised by Drew Allen, Josh Madin, David Nipperess, and Matthew Kosnik. Academics and postdocs welcome. You will need to bring your own laptop capable of wireless connection. Participant numbers will be capped (first-in secures a place).

At this session we’ll introduce some of the most common statistical procedures including correlation, regression, generalised linear models, analysis of variance/covariance, and diagnostic statistics. Common non-parametric statistical procedures will also be discussed, along with bootstrap resampling procedures, which allow statistics to be calculated for data that do not uphold normality assumptions. Attendance at the 'INTRODUCTION TO R' module (Wednesday the 16th March) is a prerequisite for attending the STATISTICS IN R module unless the attendee has prior experience in R.

Please note that tea breaks will be catered, but not lunch. Participants will need to make their own arrangements for lunch.

Click here to register for 'Statistics in R'

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Accelerating your research with digital data collection

Half-day workshop running over the afternoon (1-3pm) of Tuesday the 26th April. Offered by Adela Sobotkova, Brian Ballsun-Stanton, Petra Janouchova, and Shawn Ross, this workshop will present a tool for making your field data collection easier and less error-prone. Postdocs and academics welcome.

The FAIMS Project builds tools for digital data collection in the field, and online processing and archiving of the resulting data. FAIMS has developed a mobile, offline, multi-user collection platform for structured, free-text, geospatial, and multimedia data.

This workshop will introduce the FAIMS project - an open source initiative led by Macquarie University. Its flagship product, the FAIMS mobile platform, was designed for the collection of structured data, geospatial data, and multimedia, including synchronisation across multiple devices in degraded-network environments.

The first half of the workshop will discuss the features of the FAIMS mobile platform, and its suitability for different field research use cases. The second half of the workshop will revolve around hands-on training in the use and reuse of existing digital recording digital "modules", server administration, module customisation and co-development.

Click here to register for 'Accelerating your research with digital data collection'

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Academic writing and communication

One-day masterclass, supported by the Macquarie University ECR Network, running on Tuesday 5th April (9:30am – 4pm). Organised by Michael Gillings and Culum Brown. In addition to Postgraduate students, academics and postdocs are most welcome to attend. This workshop is an introduction to scientific authorship and communication. For practice, you will draft a small research proposal during the day. The best draft proposal to undertake research that bridges disciplines will be awarded the 2016 Writing and communicating for science 'Research Proposal Award'.

Please note that tea breaks will be catered, but not lunch. Participants will need to make their own arrangements for lunch.

Click here to register for 'Academic writing and communication'

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Bioinformatics: A Hands-On Introduction

Half-day workshop running over the morning (9am – 12) of Friday the 1st July. Offered by Jennifer Hallinan, Georgy Sofronov and Nino Kordzakhia. Academics and postdocs welcome. You will need to bring your own laptop capable of wireless connection. Participant numbers will be capped (first-in secures a place).

Modern biology produces huge amounts of data, and as technologies develop, datasets will only become larger. The ability to look at entire genomes, proteomes, interactomes and other “omes” will continue to give us insight into the workings of cells, organisms, and ecologies. Human brains cannot hold all of this data! In this very short introduction to bioinformatics we will look at how computers can be used in the analysis of biological data. We cover the most important resources for a biologist, including major websites and some stand-alone software that can be used to analyse DNA sequence data.

The session includes a hands-on component, for which you will need your own laptop. All software used is freely available for download, and detailed instructions will be sent before the course. If you’re having trouble, we can help you get set up on the day. No previous experience of bioinformatics is required.

Click here to register for 'Bioinformatics: A Hands-On Introduction'

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Faculty of Science and Engineering Tutor Induction 

One-day equivalent workshop running over the mornings (9:30am - 12:30pm) of Wednesday the 13th and Thursday the 14th July. Hosted by the Genes to Geoscience Research Enrichment Program (GGREP) and run by Melanie Bishop, this workshop has been expanded to all tutors in the Faculty of Science and Engineering.

This workshop is designed to enhance your confidence in, and develop your awareness of, issues in teaching small groups (such as in a prac classes or tutorials). Topics covered will include: effective questioning, encouraging equal participation, managing student behaviour, and giving and receiving feedback. This workshop will be of interest to new and experienced tutors alike. 

Click here to register for the 'Faculty of Science and Engineering Tutor Induction'

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Genes to Geoscience Outlook Conference 2016

A two-day research conference held over Tuesday 26th and Wednesday 27th July (9am – 5pm each day). Organised by Michael Gillings, with 12 or more speakers, including distinguished visitors from beyond Macquarie. Academics and postdocs warmly encouraged to attend. Lunches, morning and afternoon teas are provided.

This is the flagship of the Genes to Geoscience program. It is a meeting that is for future-scoping diverse research areas, generating networks, and establishing collaborations. Participants examine diverse topics of broad interest and explore the big questions across a range of disciplines. It’s an opportunity to build a community of postgraduate students and academics of all levels from within and outside the university.

Click here to register for the 'Genes to Geoscience Outlook Conference 2016'

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Transition from PhD to early career researcher

One-day workshop running on Thursday the 25th August (9:30am – 4pm). Organised by Michelle Power with other contributors.

This workshop will be of most interest to PhD researchers interested in pursuing postdoc fellowships and research careers following degrees in biology and closely related disciplines. The information in this workshop will be relevant to both early and late-tenure PhD researchers. Topics will include:

a) Building your track record and your CV

b) Grants and fellowships for PhDs and postdocs

c) Getting the most out of a conference

d) Deciding who to collaborate with (including industry partners) and sustaining collaborations.

e) Developing and show-casing your generic-skills (non-research based) during your PhD program

f) Work-life balance

g) Planning and taking opportunities during your early career researcher years (ECR; first 5 years after PhD)

h) Developing your own research directions

Please note that tea breaks will be catered, but not lunch. Participants will need to make their own arrangements for lunch.

Click here to register for 'Transition from PhD to early career researcher'

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Detecting signals of environmental selection in population genomics

One-day workshop running on Thursday the 1st September (9am – 5pm). Organised by Rachael Dudaniec (Macquarie University) and Paul Rymer (Hawkesbury Institute - Western Sydney University). Postdocs and academics welcome. Participant numbers will be capped at 25 – first-in secures a place.

How species respond to both changing climates and landscapes has spurred an increase in research into the adaptive capacities of species across spatial scales.  Therefore, the development of methods to detect local adaptation at the genetic level is steadily increasing, leading to diverse approaches and tools that integrate both environmental and phenotypic drivers of evolution. A major challenge associated with this has been differentiating signals of selection as detected by changes in the distribution and frequency of alleles across environmental conditions. Translating this evidence into projections of how land use and climate change will affect adaptation is a concurrent challenge. The above issues are the main focus of spatial (or landscape, waterscape) genomics and will be covered in this one-day workshop. This workshop will integrate both conceptual foundations and practical resources for detecting environmental selection using genomic data (mainly, Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms), including a practical session and evaluation of existing software that performs genotype by environment analysis (also called Environmental Association Analysis). Existing knowledge in this area will be synthesised via participant discussion and presentations. Issues with comparing multiple software outputs and interpretation will be discussed. This workshop is designed to encourage awareness of both the current status quo and scope for future directions of this popular and rapidly developing analysis approach, which is increasingly being applied across population, landscape, conservation and evolutionary genomics.

Please note that tea breaks will be catered, but not lunch. Participants will need to make their own arrangements for lunch.

Click here to register for 'Detecting signals of environmental selection in population genomics'

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Trait Ecology

Two-day masterclass running on the Thursdays; 8th and 15th September (9am – 5pm each day). Presented by Michelle Leishman, Mark Westoby, Ian Wright, Will Cornwell (UNSW), and Daniel Falster. Postdocs and academics welcome. 

Trait ecology is a distinctive strength of Macquarie university. This masterclass will summarise the current state of trait research and identify possible fruitful future directions.  Both days will involve presentations and focus-group sessions. Presentations will revolve around key papers and issues in the interpretation of trait data. Focus group sessions will delve into trait analyses, the practicalities of working across multiple lab groups and the possible future directions of trait research.

Please note that tea breaks will be catered, but not lunches. Participants will need to make their own arrangements for lunch each day.

Click here to register for 'Trait Ecology'

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Non-academic jobs following a PhD

One-day workshop running on Thursday the 22nd September as an open question forum session (9:30am – 4pm). Organised by Rob Lanfear, Sally Purcell, and Serene Lin-Stephens. Postdocs and academics welcome.

This workshop will help highlight some of the non-academic career pathways that biology PhD graduates (and closely related disciplines) are likely to move into from academia.

External panel members will be invited to share their knowledge and experience of non-academic careers, and how to transition into them from academia. Participants will have the opportunity to hear their opinion and advice but also ask questions. Lunch, morning and afternoon teas will be provided.

A subsequent series of ‘community practice’ sessions will assist with the practicalities of a transition to non-academic careers. These regular, supportive and communal sessions will provide participants the opportunity to explore skill-strengths and values, identify non-academic careers and workshop strong applications targeting these careers.

Given that 80% of PhD graduates will move into non-academic careers, this workshop is likely to be especially helpful for HDR and ERCs.

******This workshop has been postponed until 2017*****

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42 shades of leadership

Half-day workshop, supported by the Macquarie University ECR Network, running over the afternoon (2-5pm) of Tuesday the 11th October. Organised by Mariella Herberstein as an open-question forum with multiple contributors. Postdocs and academics welcome. 

Do I have leadership qualities, and if not, how do I get myself some? What on earth is ‘leadership’ anyway? These and other leadership related questions will be addressed in this half day module. As leadership and leadership style is very personal, we will draw on the experiences of a panel of guests consisting of Macquarie University staff and students as well as external alumni. We will cover leadership at all career levels, from post-graduate, post-doctoral right through to professorial and administrative levels and across a wide range of research disciplines. 

Click here to register for '42 shades of leadership'

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2013 GGREP Module Menu

2012 GGREP Module Menu

2011 GGREP Module Menu

2010 GGREP Module Menu

2009 GGREP Module Menu

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