CAVE Media 2012

CAVE Media 2012

Written

2012

IVF treatment for older women: is age the greatest concern? by Mianna Lotz

The Conversation, October 27, 2012
CAVE member, Mianna Lotz

Considerable public controversy exists around the question of access to in-vitro fertilisation treatment (IVF) for older women. Some support unlimited, publicly-funded access for all infertile women and couples, irrespective of age. Others beg to differ. Read more.

A womb of her own: risking uterus transplant for pregnancy, by Ruby Catsanos

The Conversation, October 15, 2012
CAVE student, Ruby Catsanos

On a weekend in mid-September 2012, a team of gynaecologists and transplant specialists at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Sweden, performed two uterus transplants with living donors. In both cases, a mother donated her womb to her daughter. Both recipients were young women in their early 30s, one had her uterus removed because of cancer and the other was born without one. Read more.

The Work of Judges - Tough-on-crime advocates rise, by Kate Rossmanith

The Monthly: Australian Politics, Society and Culture, September 2012
CAVE member, Kate Rossmanith

Why wisdom matters, and sentencing by numbers is selling justice short.

A couple of years ago, as I waited outside Courtroom 3 of the NSW Supreme Court in King Street, Sydney, I got chatting to an elderly man, a retiree, who told me he routinely visited the courts because he liked "seeing the justice system in action". Along with 40 others, we were attending the sentencing of a 39-year-old woman who had been found guilty of murder. She had deliberately run over a young man with her car and killed him. As we filed into the courtroom, I asked my companion if he thought that the woman felt remorseful. Read more.

New hope for stem cell organs, by Cathy O'Leary

The West Australian, March 12, 2012
CAVE member, Wendy Rogers

Researchers are moving closer to being able to grow fully functional organs from scratch using a patient's own stem cells, offering a potential solution to donor shortages. Read more

Grow-your-own organs, by staff reporter

The Age, March 12, 2012
CAVE member, Wendy Rogers

International researchers are moving closer to being able to grow fully functional organs from scratch using the patient's own stem cells, offering a potential solution to donor shortages. Read more. Also available at the Sydney Morning Herald.  

Lab-made organs could offer a solution to donor shortage, by Justin Norrie

The Conversation, March 9, 2012
CAVE member, Wendy Rogers

Scientists say they have developed a way to use a patient's own stem cells to build fully functional organs in a laboratory, in a potential solution to the global donor shortage crisis. Read more

Round-up: Engineering whole organs (The Lancet*) - experts respond

March 9, 2012
CAVE member, Wendy Rogers

Swedish and American authors say a new technique involving the use of an artificial scaffold into which a patient's own stem cells are inserted, turning it into a fully functional organ, could offer a potential solution to the donor shortage crisis. The review article is one of two papers in a Lancet stem cell series. 

Moral perils on the way to the future, by Hugh Wilson

The Australian, February 25, 2012

A super soldier with enhanced mental alertness targets weapons systems using his mind. A riot cop whose physical courage has been determined by a brain scan fires incapacitating chemicals into a crowd of protesters.

These may sound like scenarios from the latest hit video game, but according to a report by the Royal Society, Britain's national academy of science, rapid advances in neuroscience could make them a realistic vision of the future of warfare and law enforcement. The report - titled Brain Waves Module 3: Neuroscience, Conflict and Security - concludes neuroscience could be used to boost the performance of soldiers and policemen, choose the most suitable individuals for particular tasks and enable soldiers to control weapons through a direct mind-machine interface, as well as creating a new generation of chemical weapons. Read more.

Audio

2012

Modern Dilemmas: The difficulty of acknowledging shame, presented by Natasha Mitchell

Life Matters, ABC Radio National, December 31, 2012
CAVE member, Doris McIlwain

What can you do when your partner has little interest in sex and he doesn't want to discuss the problem? Hear more by Doris McIwain.

Modern Dilemmas: The Spirit of Christmas, presented by Natasha Mitchell

Life Matters, ABC Radio National, November 26, 2012
CAVE member, Doris McIlwain

What is Christmas about for you? Is it about decorating the tree? Being with family and friends? Or is it about hunting down that perfect gift for a loved one? Today's dilemma is all about the spirit of giving, and when it can be too much... Hear more by Doris McIlwain.

Modern Dilemmas: Travel or donate? presented by Natasha Mitchell

Life Matters, ABC Radio National, October 15, 2012
CAVE member, Doris McIlwain

It's the time of year when you might be planning and paying for a trip away...many of us can spend quite a bit of money on our annual holiday. The question of travel and ethics is at the core of today's modern dilemma which comes from Pippa. My modern dilemma is this - I would dearly love to re-visit some of the great art galleries of Europe. I have no doubt this would be a very enriching experience for me and I have been able to save enough to make this overseas trip, about $6,000. But here's the rub. I could spend the money in this purely self-indulgent way.  Alternatively, I could choose to give away these surplus funds in the belief that, if enough other people did likewise, it would certainly help alleviate the suffering of some of our fellow human beings who we know to be in much more desperate need than ourselves. Hear more by Doris McIlwain.

Modern Dilemmas: Should you retire? presented by Natasha Mitchell

Life Matters, ABC Radio National, August 27, 2012
CAVE member, Doris McIlwain

What's the right time to retire? This is the dilemma facing 'Mary' and she writes: 'I've been told recently by several people that I have an ethical dilemma -- but in a tone that suggests they believe there's really only one course of action for me. I am very skilled and professionally successful and the people who engaged me were delighted with my services. I'm in my late sixties and own my own home. Yet now, apparently in the view of some people, I have no right to a job. These people have indicated that I don't have a right to seek work because I would be "taking a job" from people who have "four kids and a mortgage"... Surely I have the right to compete equally for work, regardless of my age or financial situation. Or should I accept that I no longer have that right, just because I've worked hard to pay for my home and am no longer responsible for raising my children?' Hear more by Doris McIlwain.

The Beast Within: The ethics of animal experimentation, presented by Natasha Mitchell

Life Matters, ABC Radio National, August 24, 2012
CAVE member, Jane Johnson

Animal experimentation is one of the most vexed and debated issues in science and in wider society. We value some animals as pets and companions, but others are valued differently and are used in the interests of advancing medical and scientific understanding. How do we make those decisions and how do they divide us on ethical and scientific grounds? Hear more by Jane Johnson.

Modern Dilemmas: limiting terms of office for bodies corporate, presented by Natasha Mitchell

Life Matters, ABC Radio National, August 6, 2012
CAVE member, Doris McIlwain

The United States has a two term limit for its presidents. Thomas Jefferson argued that 'If some period be not fixed, either by the Constitution or by practice, to the services of the First Magistrate, his office, though nominally elective, will in fact be for life; and that will soon degenerate into an inheritance.' Should such a limit be applied for all executive positions from the boardroom to the body corporate? Hear more by Doris McIlwain.

Modern Dilemmas: After the divorce, what should you tell the kids? presented by Natasha Mitchell

Life Matters, ABC Radio National, May 28, 2012
CAVE member, Doris McIlwain

How much information do you tell your children about their father, your ex-husband? He has often given my adult children the same kind of heartache and hurtful abuse that he dished out to me when we were married.  After much deliberation and reflection, I am sure that I have found my own resolution but I think it is a dilemma worthy of discussion. One of the questions is: Why tell them more details other than what they might have witnessed? Hear more by Doris McIlwain.

Remembering together, presented by Lynne Malcolm

All in the Mind, ABC Radio National, May 27, 2012
CAVE member, John Sutton

We explore a new way of thinking about memory, collectively. We feel we should be able to recall all sorts of things at will - but how often do our individual memories fail us?  We use lists, diaries and smart phones - but very often we rely on each other to jog our memories. Hear more by John Sutton.

Modern Dilemmas: Wedding Guests, presented by Natasha Mitchell

Life Matters, ABC Radio National, April 23, 2012
CAVE member, Doris McIlwain

Our conundrum for this week? I've recently got engaged and my fiancé and I are struggling to keep our guest list down. How do you explain to people both family and friends or friends of parents that we have to keep the numbers down. People keep inviting themselves when they find out we are engaged as well. What do I tell them when that happens. HELP! Hear more by Doris McIlwain.

Modern Dilemmas: donating to a good cause, presented by Natasha Mitchell

Life Matters, ABC Radio National, April 16, 2012
CAVE member, Doris McIlwain

This week's conundrum: I work in an op-shop which raises money for a not-for-profit organisation. Recently a very valuable painting was donated to sell in the shop. I remember who donated it. Do I have a moral responsibility to let the original owner know, or is the organisation free to sell the painting and keep the money? Hear more by Doris McIlwain.

Extending the mind, presented by Alan Saunders

The Philosopher's Zone, ABC Radio National, March 25, 2012
CAVE members, Richard Menary and John Sutton

Where does the mind stop and the rest of the world begin? Some philosophers are now arguing that thoughts are not all in the head. The environment has an active role in driving cognition; cognition is sometimes made up of neural, bodily, and environmental processes. Hear more by Richard Menary and John Sutton.

Modern Dilemmas: parents and homework, presented by Natasha Mitchell

Life Matters, ABC Radio National, March 19, 2012
CAVE member, Doris McIlwain

As a parent or carer, is helping a teenager with their homework cheating, or helping to keep options open? Hear more by Doris McIlwain.

Clinical Trials, presented by Natasha Mitchell

Life Matters, ABC Radio National, March 12, 2012
CAVE member, Wendy Rogers

How do human clinical trials work and have you ever volunteered for one? Clinical trials are crucial for the development of new treatments but are there enough safeguards for potential recruits especially if someone is terminally ill? Hear more by Wendy Rogers. 

Modern Dilemmas: The Mechanic, presented by Natasha Mitchell

Life Matters, ABC Radio National, February 6, 2012
CAVE member, Doris McIlwain

We explore the ethical minefield of modern life. Today what should an apprentice do when his employer tells him to clean and paint alternators and then sell them on as reconditioned? Hear more by Doris McIlwain.

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