2017 Colloquia Series

2017 Colloquia Series

Prof Dan Simons

Upcoming CEPET Colloquia in 2017


Professor Dan Simons, University of Illinois, USA

Do 'brain training' programs work?

Professor Simons's research program explores the mechanisms of attention, perception, memory, and thinking. The study of these topics falls into sub-division of psychology known as "visual cognition". Dan's  best known studies explore the limits of visual awareness and the many ways our intuitions about perception and attention diverge from the reality. His laboratory adopts methods ranging from real-world and video-based approaches to computer-based psychophysical techniques, and it includes basic behavioral measures, eye tracking, simulator studies, and training studies. This diversity of approaches helps Professor Simons establish closer links between basic research on the mechanisms of the mind and the practical consequences and implications of those findings in our daily lives. Click here to read more about Professor Dan Simons's research.

  • Title: Do 'Brain Training' Programs Work?
  • Where: Lecture Theatre 1.200, Level 1, Hearing Hub Building, Macquarie University
  • When: Tuesday June 20, 2017
  • Time: 1:00-2:00pm
  • RSVP: Kirk Olsen (kirk.olsen@mq.edu.au)
  • Abstract: In 2014, a large group of scientists released a "consensus" letter stating that there is little or no evidence for real cognitive benefits from brain games. Shortly afterward, a group of brain training proponents released their own letter touting the extensive evidence for everyday benefits of cognitive training. How could two teams of scientists examine the same literature and come to conflicting “consensus” views about the effectiveness of brain training? In this talk, I present the results of a comprehensive evaluation of all evidence cited by leading brain training companies and proponents as support for the benefits of brain training. We find evidence that practicing a brain training game will make you better at that game, but we found almost no compelling evidence that such games will improve everyday cognition or improve cognitive aging. I will discuss the state of the evidence and will provide a set of scientific standards for improving brain training research and interpreting the results of brain training studies.

Professor Gerry Fogarty, University of Southern Queensland, Australia

Professor Fogarty's research interests include human factors, the structure of human intelligence, management of human error in high risk industries, occupational stress, and career decision making. Click here to read more about Professor Fogarty's research.

  • Title: TBC
  • Where: Macquarie University’s Senate Room, Building C8A, Room 310
  • When: Tuesday August 22, 2017
  • Time: 1:00-2:00pm
  • RSVP: Kirk Olsen (kirk.olsen@mq.edu.au)
  • Abstract: TBC

Professor Peter Keller, Western Sydney University, Australia

Professor Peter Keller is the leader of our Music Cognition and Action research program and an Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellow. His research aims at understanding the behavioural and brain bases of human interaction in musical contexts, specifically the cognitive and motor processes that enable ensemble musicians to coordinate with one another. Click here to read more about Professor Keller's research.

  • Title: TBC
  • Where: Macquarie University’s Senate Room, Building C8A, Room 310
  • When: Wednesday November 22, 2017
  • Time: 1:00-2:00pm
  • RSVP: Kirk Olsen (kirk.olsen@mq.edu.au)
  • Abstract: TBC

Completed CEPET Colloquia in 2017

Associate Professor Donna O'Connor, University of Sydney, Australia

  • Title: Youth high performance football environments: Current research and trends
  • Where: Room 3.610, level 3, Hearing Hub Building, Macquarie University
  • When: Tuesday May 23, 2017
  • Time: 1:00-2:00pm

Professor Robert Vallerand, Laboratoire de Recherche sur le Comportement Social Université du Québec à Montréal and the Australian Catholic University

  • Title: On the two roads to excellence: The role of passion
  • Where: Macquarie University’s Senate Room, Building C8A, Room 310 
  • When: Thursday February 16, 2017
  • Time: 12:00-1:00pm
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