CEPET Colloquia Series

CEPET Colloquia Series

2016 Colloquia Series

How and Why to Write for the Conversation Website

Sunanda Creagh, NSW Commissioning Editor, The Conversation

As part of its 2016 colloquia series, CEPET is proud to welcome Sunanda Creagh from the Conversation, who will speak on November 29 about how and why to write for the Conversation website.

Sunanda is an award-winning journalist and 2004 graduate of the UTS with a B.A Communications (Journalism) and International Studies (Indonesia), and is The Conversation's FactCheck Editor and NSW Commissioning Editor. Before joining The Conversation in 2011, Sunanda worked as a political and general news correspondent in the Reuters Jakarta bureau. Prior to that, she was a reporter at The Sydney Morning Herald, where she covered politics, urban affairs, arts, features, and sport. Her work has been published by SBS, the ABC, The Washington Post, CNN, ESPN, the International Herald Tribune, The Scotsman, the Boston Globe and The New York Times. Sunanda was a co-winner of an Earth Journalism Award in 2009.

Where: Macquarie University’s Senate Room, Building C8A, Room 310
When:
Tuesday November 29
Time:
12:30-1:30pm

Abstract: In this session, NSW Commissioning Editor, Sunanda Creagh, will cover the benefits of writing for The Conversation, how to pitch an idea, what sort of ideas the editors are seeking, how to write and how to use your Conversation contributions to demonstrate impact. The Conversation is a website funded by universities that publishes 800 word analyses by academics. The Conversation attracts 35 million unique reads worldwide each month through its Creative Commons republications in outlets that include Fairfax, the New York Times, IFLS, Washington Post, CNN and many more. Our academic authors report that writing for The Conversation has led to book deals, increased publication downloads, happy funders and new sources of funding, invitation to submit to high ranking journals, invitations to brief policymakers and broader media coverage of their work. Come and learn how you can make The Conversation work for you.


The Final Frontier: Introducing Football Psychology in Coach Education Programs in Belgian Football

Kris Perquy, Maenhout and Perquy: Mental Coaching in Topsport, Belgium

As part of its 2016 colloquia series, CEPET is proud to welcome Kris Perquy, a sports psychologist from Belgium who will speak on November 24 about introducing football psychology in coach education programs.

Kris is founding partner of Maenhout & Perquy, a sport coaching organisation that focuses on improving performance of professional athletes, clubs and sport associations. Since 2008 he has worked extensively with players and coaches, mostly in football, but also in volleyball, judo, swimming, racing, and horseball. He has been working with the Belgian FA for the past nine years and has helped them to professionalise their football psychology offering for players and coaches. He is co-author of a mental workbook for young football players, “Get a Head Start”, and has been invited as a speaker in different international conferences (e.g., Madeira, Moscow, Hongkong, Philadelphia). He combines a career in sport consultancy with an activity as executive coach in the corporate world. For more information, click here.

Where: Macquarie University’s Senate Room, Building C8A, Room 310
When:
Thursday November 24
Time:
12:00-1:00pm

Abstract: Since 2010 the Belgian FA has asked sport psychologists to develop a course in football psychology for grassroots football, in order to offer all coaches a more comprehensive insight into this domain. We have been involved in this program from the start, and have written and delivered the course all over Belgium. Since 2016 we have added a second level to this program, a more practical course for teaching mental skills during football practice. This has allowed coaches to apply what they learned in the first level in their own team (using checklists for mental profiling, exercises for team building and better coaching, mental drills on the pitch, and so forth). Finally, we have developed ‘Masterclass Coaching’, a course aimed at a small group of high-level coaches, to tweak their coaching skills. We focus on half-time talks, player evaluation meetings, motivational feedback and personal strengths of the coaches, and end with a personal development plan. I will also discuss some of other projects with the Belgian FA, such as the results of 3 years of mental profiling of the Belgian youth international players and the use of a mental workbook in football elite school programs in Belgium.


Neuroscience-Informed Sound, Music, and Wearable Computing for Rehabilitation and Learning

Associate Professor Ye Wang, National University of Singapore

As part of its 2016 colloquia series, CEPET is proud to welcome Associate Professor Ye Wang from the National University of Singapore, who will speak on November 22 about neuroscience-informed sound, music, and wearable computing for rehabilitation and learning.

Ye Wang is an Associate Professor in the Computer Science Department at the National University of Singapore (NUS) and NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering (NGS). He established and directed the sound and music computing (SMC) Lab. Before joining NUS he was a member of the technical staff at Nokia Research Center in Tampere, Finland for 9 years. His research interests include sound analysis and music information retrieval (MIR), mobile computing, and cloud computing, and their applications in music edutainment , e-Learning, and e-Health, as well as determining their effectiveness via subjective and objective evaluations. His most recent projects involve the design and evaluation of systems to support 1) therapeutic gait training using Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation (RAS), 2) second language learning, and 3) motivating exercise via music-based systems. For more information, click here.

Where: Macquarie University's VR Lab, Simulation Hub, Building Y3A (Meet in Building Y3A Foyer at 12:25pm)
When:
Tuesday November 22
Time:
12:30-1:30pm

Abstract: The use of music as an aid in improving body and mind has received enormous attention over the last 20 years from a wide range of disciplines, including neuroscience, physical therapy, exercise science, and psychological medicine. We have attempted to transform insights gained from the scientific study of music, learning, and medicine into real-life applications that can be delivered widely, effectively, and accurately. We have been using music to enhance learning as well as to augment evidence-based medicine. In this talk, I will describe tools to facilitate the delivery of established music-enhanced therapies, harnessing the synergy of sound and music computing (SMC), mobile computing, and cloud computing technologies to promote learning and to facilitate disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment in both developed countries and resource-poor developing countries. These tools are being developed as part of ongoing research projects that combine wearable sensors, smartphone apps, and cloud-based therapy delivery systems to facilitate music-enhanced learning and music-enhanced physical therapy. I will also discuss the joys and pains working in such a multidisciplinary environment.


Optimising the Balance between Task Automation and Human Manual ControlShayne Loft

Associate Professor Shayne Loft, Department of Psychology, University of Western Australia

As part of its 2016 colloquia series, CEPET is proud to welcome Associate Professor Shayne Loft from the University of Western Australia, who will speak on November 2nd about optimising the balance between task automation and human manual control.

Associate Professor Loft’s areas of expertise include automation, memory, human error, situational awareness, fatigue, training, decision-making, and individual differences. He is particularly enthusiastic about strengthening the link between research science and practice, and highly values the transfer of knowledge and skills back to industry. For more information, visit Associate Professor Loft’s personal website here.

Where: Macquarie University’s Senate Room, Building C8A, Room 310
When:
Wednesday November 2
Time:
11am-12pm

Abstract: In environments such as defence and aviation, automating tasks can improve performance, but many accidents have occurred because human operators have not adequately regained manual control when automation has failed. As series of studies is underway (ARC Discovery Grant, 2016-2018) that draws upon psychological science to discover how best to design automation to maximise performance, whilst ensuring that operators maintain the situation awareness required to manually control previously automated tasks if required. The current talk will describe evidence from four studies that have conducted to date with simulations of submarine track management, conducted by two of my PhD students (Stephanie Chen & Monica Tatasciore) in the Human Factors and Applied Cognition Laboratory at UWA. The key question concerns how to ensure that automation is engaged when task demands rise, in order to maximise performance; and disengaged when demands decrease, in order to encourage the operator to update their situation awareness.


Developing a Tool to Measure Diagnostic Expertise in PracticeProfessor Mark Wiggins

Professor Mark Wiggins, Department of Psychology, Macquarie University

As part of its 2016 colloquia series, CEPET Deputy Director Professor Mark Wiggins from Macquarie University’s Department of Psychology will speak on August 31 about the development of a psychometric tool designed to assess diagnostic performance across a range of different contexts.

Professor Mark Wiggins is a Registered Psychologist within the area of Organisational Psychology. Mark's research and teaching interests lie in the assessment and development of expert performance, particularly in the context of cognitive skills such as diagnosis and decision-making. To find out more about Professor Wiggins's research, click here.

Where: Australian Hearing Hub, Level 3, Room 3.610
When:
Wednesday August 31
Time:
12-1pm

Abstract: Diagnostic accuracy is critical in environments from medicine to aviation and power system control. However, the diagnostic performance of practitioners in these environments is rarely evaluated post their initial qualification. In this presentation, I chart the development of a psychometric tool designed to assess diagnostic performance across a range of different contexts. I explain the theoretical basis of the tool, together with the translation of the proof of concept into a working example. The presentation targets the practicalities of research funding, the development of an evidence base for applied solutions, pitching to industry partners, undertaking research in industrial settings, and the challenges of applied research designs.


Untangling Expertise in Face IdentificationDr. David White

Dr. David White, School of Psychology, University of New South Wales

As part of its 2016 colloquia series, CEPET is proud to welcome Dr. David White from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) to speak about expertise in face identification and its important consequences in forensic and security settings.

Dr. White currently holds a postdoctoral research fellowship at UNSW and investigates the cognitive processes and representations driving face recognition, familiarity, and perceptual expertise. His recent work has focused on individual differences and expert performance in face identification tasks, both in trained professionals and individuals with natural aptitude in such tasks. To find out more about Dr. White's research, click here.

Where: Macquarie University’s Senate Room, Building C8A, Room 310
When:
Wednesday June 29
Time:
1-2pm

Abstract: People’s ability to perceive and identify faces is often regarded as a ‘gold-standard’ in perceptual expertise. Typically, experiments examining face expertise present stimuli captured in precisely controlled environmental settings. In this talk, Dr White focuses on novice and expert performance in face matching tasks that are encountered outside of the laboratory. This work reveals important limits to face identification expertise ‘in the wild’ that carry serious consequences in forensic and security settings. Data also show that experts with extensive training in unfamiliar face identification employ qualitatively different strategies to untrained students. Perhaps counter intuitively, these strategies are similar to compensatory mechanisms employed by people with Prosopagnosia, to overcome a specific cognitive deficit in recognising familiar faces. A framework is proposed to account for these findings, which has guided recent efforts to improve performance of experts in unfamiliar face identification.

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