Tag Archives: 2014 Research Excellence Awards

Jim Piper Award for Excellence in Research Leadership (Highly Commended 2014)

Professor Michael Withford’s current research explores femtosecond laser modification of transparent materials, and the development of novel 2D and 3D lightwave devices. Outcomes include fibre Bragg gratings, monolithic waveguide lasers, high power fibre lasers, quantum photonics and interferometric chips for astronomy.

Jim Piper Award for Excellence in Research Leadership (Highly Commended 2014)

Amanda has an international reputation for innovative contributions to cognitive science and psychology in two distinct fields. She has pioneered the use of hypnosis to develop compelling laboratory versions of a catalogue of clinical delusions and is at the forefront of new “collective” memory research on the benefits of remembering together.

Early Career Researcher of the Year Award – Social Sciences, Business & Humanities (2014 Award Winner)

One in 5 Australians will experience chronic pain in their life and approximately 1 in 10 Australians will experience a level of pain that leads to significant levels of anxiety, depression and disability. Unfortunately, research indicates Australians with chronic pain are missing out on specialist assessment and treatment.

Early Career Researcher of the Year Award – Social Sciences, Business & Humanities (Highly Commended 2014)

Celia is currently engaged in a series of research projects that study “real-world” remembering and forgetting in individuals and groups. Celia also focuses on applications to real-world problems, like cognitive decline with age, and examine the function of remembering – what memories mean to individuals and to groups.

Early Career Researcher of the Year Award – Social Sciences, Business & Humanities (Highly Commended 2014)

Dr Tom Murray’s research addresses the aspirations of Indigenous communities to overcome historical injustice and contemporary inequality, and provides a forum for non-indigenous understanding of indigenous cultural and political perspectives.

Early Career Researcher of the Year Award – Science & Engineering (2014 Award Winner)

Coral reefs worldwide are threatened by many impacts. Many are large, remote, and difficult to monitor, limiting our ability to assess reef health. By integrating remote sensing technology with behavioural theory, Dr Elizabeth Madin is developing a novel method of using satellite imagery to remotely monitor reef health.

Early Career Researcher of the Year Award – Science & Engineering (Highly Commended 2014)

The Earth’s climate has changed dramatically in the past 50 years, with even larger changes expected in the near future. Such changes greatly impact the global ecosystems on which we depend. In order to better understand those impacts, scientists are collecting unprecedented amounts of data on ecosystem health and function.

Early Career Researcher of the Year Award – Science & Engineering (Highly Commended 2014)

Providing normal social interactions for many animals kept in captivity is extremely challenging. For Asian elephants, social media creates virtual herds that allow females at distant zoos to communicate.

Excellence in Higher Degree Research – Social Sciences, Business & Humanities (2014 Award Winner)

The main goal of Mirko’s research in the philosophy of cognitive science is to investigate the relevance of psycho-historical theories of cultural learning for the socio-technological scaffolding, development, and phylogenetic evolution of human cognition.