Severe weather

Severe weather

In Australia, the Bureau of Meteorology is the government organisation that issues severe storm warning alerts

Thunderstorms and Lighting

  • All thunderstorms should be considered dangerous, as they nearly always produce lightning
  • Postpone or limit your outdoor activities
  • Take shelter from potential lightning strikes, move inside a building or even a motor vehicle
  • Remember, that rubber shoes or tyres provide NO protection from a lightning strike
  • Unplug any electrical devices near you, to prevent damage from a lightning strike
  • Stay away from windows and doors and anywhere with glass
  • Monitor local media channels for regular updates

Hail/Torrential Rain/Flooding

  • Take note of Severe Weather Warnings broadcast on local media channels
  • Postpone your outdoor activities
  • Seek shelter in a building, and remember that vehicles do not provide you with the best protection in a hail storm
  • Stay away from windows or other glass areas within the building, whilst the hail storm is occurring
  • Always assume that any bodies of water that you encounter are deep and should be avoided.
  • Torrential rain can produce flash flooding; do not drive your car through flooded areas, as they may be deeper than you expect
  • In NSW, the State Emergency Service (SES) provides assistance should your house or accommodation be flooded or severely damaged by floodwater or fallen trees

Heat Waves

  • The effects of a heat wave can include heat cramps, heat exhaustion, heatstroke/sunstroke, all of which should be taken as a serious medical condition
  • In extreme heat conditions, it is important to dress appropriately and to try to stay indoors avoiding long periods of exposure to the sun
  • Most importantly, stay hydrated
  • The effects of extreme heat conditions can be more prevalent on elderly people and young children
  • Monitor local media channels for warnings and regular updates


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