Checklist: Facilities & operations

Checklist: Facilities & operations

Resource Efficiency and Waste

ACTION: Personal paper recycling bins are readily accessible within 4 metres of every staff member’s desk.

Why do it?

Paper can be recycled through the personal paper recycling boxes located in office areas or the larger 240 litre blue paper bins. The types of paper that can be recycled through this system include: newspapers, junk mail, magazines, office paper (even with staples, though not in large quantity), notepads, phone books, envelopes (even with windows) and light cardboard. Things that can't be recycled include sticky notes, plastic bags, tissue paper, food scraps, and heavy or waxed cardboard. To order the personal paper recycling boxes, please fill out an Online Service Request with how many boxes are required and the delivery location.

Resources

Online service request

Case Study

ACTION: All staff have double sided printing as the default setting for printers and multi-function devices (MFD) 

Why do it?

Printing double sided (duplex) is an easy to way to reduce paper consumption by half. All University staff are required to have double sided printing as the default setting for printers and multi-function devices. If staff need assistance creating this setting, please log a One Help ticket.

Resources

One Help

Case Study

3

ACTION: The Department has a central designated area for stationery office items that can be reused (e.g file folders, binders, pens, staplers etc).

Why do it?

Setting up a system to donate and acquire stationery office items is a great way to save money and reduce office items being thrown out unnecessarily.

Resources

Case Study

Faculty of Human Science: With the support of the Dean and fellow staff, SRN member Suzane Azzi has been involved in numerous sustainability initiatives within the Faculty. A recent Faculty wide initiative has involved an office stationary drive whereby Faculty staff were encouraged to 'declutter' their office and donate unwanted and never used office stationery items for the establishment of a new Faculty stationery reuse system. Student volunteers assisted with the project by volunteering their time to collect donated items and do a stock-take of what was contributed in preparation for the new on-line system. This initiative has successfully got office items back in circulation again and has been a great partnership project between staff and students!

4

ACTION: The Department uses rechargeable batteries rather than single use batteries.

Why do it?

Rechargeable batteries are better for the environment than disposable batteries because they conserve resources and are energy efficient. Rechargeable batteries and chargers can be purchased through OfficeMax.

Resources

Case Study

5

ACTION: Toner cartridges are recycled in the Department

Why do it?

By recycling your department's cartridges you are diverting waste from landfill and recovering resources for reprocessing. To organise a free toner cartridge recycling station visit the Cartridges4PlanetArk website.

Resources

Cartridges 4 Planet Ark

Case Study

6

ACTION: In the last 12 months, purchase and/or leasing of ICT hardware has been minimised and done on an as needed basis. Equipment which is no longer required has either been rehomed internally or externally (provide evidence) or appropriately dealt with through eWaste collections arranged through the Online Service Request System.

Why do it?

Too often we purchase the latest technology update, or equipment that could otherwise be sourced elsewhere on campus. It is good practice to reduce unnecessary spend in the ICT hardware space, which has a follow on effect of reducing the need for e Waste. Electronic equipment is considered electronic waste, or 'eWaste' when it is no longer wanted and/or becomes obsolete. eWaste contains toxic or hazardous materials that pose an environmental risk if not disposed of properly.  To divert eWaste from landfill the University has eWaste collections, which can be arranged through the Online Service Request system in accordance with the eWaste Policy.

Resources

e-Waste collection request

e-Waste policy

Case Study

In the Human Sciences Faculty of Administration Office, SRN champion Suzane Azzi has encouraged staff members to recycle their e-waste by placing a box in the lunch room for small electronic items such as mobile phones, hard drives, audiotapes, video tapes, computer diskettes etc. The items are collected by Macquarie University Property for recycling. SRN representative, Hiranya Anderson has followed suit and introduced the initiative for staff in the Department of Linguistics and has found it to be a very worthwhile and successful initiative.

7

ACTION: The Department manages small composting, worm farming or bokashi bins for organic waste management.

Why do it?

Setting up a department composting, worm farming, bokashi bins, or other organic waste systems is a great way to produce a high nutrient organic matter from food scraps, which can be used as a fertiliser on plants. It also reduces the contamination of other recyclable waste and greenhouse emissions in landfill. Macquarie University Sustainability offer short workshops on composting and worm farming. Please contact Sustainability if you would like to arrange a workshop for your team.

Resources

Contact Macquarie Sustainability

Case Study

8

ACTION: The Department utilises the Furniture Re-Use Scheme for disposal and acquisition of furniture items.

Why do it?

As part of its commitment to sustainability, Macquarie has set up a furniture reuse store for staff to dispose of any unwanted furniture and to acquire items needed. All furniture items can be viewed on the on-line catalogue. The furniture store is on Level O of C7A (old library).

Resources

Furniture store

Case Study

When the Business Process Improvement team were given the space in Room 100 of the Lincoln Building to set up as a new department, their first point of call was the furniture store. The team were able to fill all their needs through the furniture store, including office desks, drawers, chairs, white boards, cupboards and the meeting room tables. Total cost savings were in excess of $5,000 - not to mention the environmental savings through reuse.

Biodiversity

ACTION: The Department actively maintains and contributes to an internal or external garden (such as a vegetable garden or community garden).

Why do it?

Gardening is a healthy activity that can be enjoyed by people of all ages. An edible garden can be started in a small area or in pots. It's important that you learn which plants are edible and ensure that chemical sprays are not used on the plants that you are going to eat. Gardening provides exercise, relaxation, fresh food and enjoyment. When undertaken with others in your department, it also provides an excellent team building opportunity.

Resources

Gardening for health - starting out

Case Study

ACTION: Healthy and thriving indoor plants are situated throughout the department.

Why do it?

Office plants significantly improve a whole range of aspects of our indoor environment, from physically cleaner air to direct beneficial effects on health, task performance and productivity. Research has shown that office plants can purify the air by filtering out harmful toxins. For information on how to green your office see ‘Get Green with Your Team’.

Resources

Get Green with your team

Case Study

Sustainable ICT

ACTION: Department only purchases ICT equipment with a Gold EPEAT rating and/or good Energy Star Rating.

Why do it?

EPEAT is a global rating system for identifying efficient high-performance electronic equipment. EPEAT maintains a searchable online database where equipment that meet strict environmental criteria across the full product lifecycle are listed, and therefore provides more detail than ENERGY STAR. Categories include energy conservation, product longevity, end-of-life management, packaging, reduction/elimination of environmentally sensitive materials, material selection and design for end of life. The University is striving for across the board Gold EPEAT ratings for ICT equipment.

Resources

EPEAT

Energy Star

Case Study

2

ACTION: Fleet management processes are in place to achieve best outcomes for energy use, flexibility for staff, and easy redeployment.

Why do it?

Ensuring you have a fleet management procedure is good business sense with ICT comprising a considerable amount of expense for an organisatio, not to mention the critical role PCs and laptops play in erveryday work requirements. Laptops generally use less energy per system, provide users with the flexibility to work anywhere, and can be easily redeployed should a staff member move to another role.

Resources

Case Study

3

ACTION: Large departments (over 50 staff) are aware of iPrint and how to use it. Where feasible, iPrint (or other Follow-me-printing solutions) have been installed.

Why do it?

iPrint.mq.edu.au is Macquarie University's united approach to greener printing throughout our campus. Departments can easily and conveniently print from your favourite applications to any iPrint location.

Resources

iPrint

Case Study

Energy

1

ACTION: All electrical equipment able to be switched off (e.g. computers, monitors and printers) is done so at the end of the day (at the powerpoint if possible).

Why do it?

Turning off electrical equipment reduces energy consumption and greenhouse emissions. Reminders can be used to assist in ensuring people are conscious about turning off wherever possible.

Resources

Posters and stickers

Energy cut

Case Study

Sally Northover, in her role as an Sustainability Representative Network (SRN) member has come up with a sweet way to encourage Macquarie University Property staff to be energy wise in their workplace. Chocolates are placed on the desks of colleagues who turn their computers off overnight, to recognise their energy efficient efforts! What a great incentive to cut emissions.

ACTION: Department proactively encourages people to use stairs instead of the lift if based in building accessed by lifts.

Why do it?

Lifts are major energy users. Using the stairs instead of the lift helps save energy as well as providing some healthy exercise.  Placing a chart beside the lifts, where staff can log their stair climbing, creates a competitive and fun element amongst colleagues! 

Resources

Case Study

Before Risk Frontiers were shifted out of the currently being refurbished E7A, a total of 18 staff from the 8th floor enthusiastically participated in a 'stairs' vs 'lifts' challenge. Placing a chart beside the lifts, whereby staff could log whether they climbed stairs instead of using the lift, created a competitive and fun element amongst colleagues, according to SRN member Lucinda Coates.  Colleagues Delphine McAneney and James O'Brien started the initiative during the Departmental Sustainability Challenge.  James calculated that each 7-flight ascent or descent was just over 19m.  This meant that 144 trips were needed in order for the team to ascend Big Ben's Mawson Peak - the highest mountain in the Australian Territories (2,745m ASL).  Lucinda deemed this an appropriate peak to "climb" as it is a volcanic massif, dominating the geography of Heard Island, and 2011 is the centenary of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition which was led by Sir Douglas Mawson.  Having conquered this peak, staff are now turning their attention to Mt Kilimanjaro.  Dr Felipe de Oliveira, one of the scientists participating in the challenge, modelled CO2 savings and identified that, if one was to average two up-and-down stair climbs per working day, this would lead to a saving of 19.2kg of CO2 per year per staff member. It's fun, it's sustainable and it's healthy too: climbing stairs is a great way to burn calories and get some fitness into one's daily routine.

ACTION: Turn off light stickers are above all light switches.

Why do it?

Turning off lights saves energy and reduces greenhouse emissions. To remind staff, message stickers can be placed above light switches and electrical outlets. Contact sustainability@mq.edu.au to order stickers.

Resources

Case Study

ACTION: Department with access to manual control of air conditioning units have set points of 20-25 degrees.

Why do it?

One of the major energy users and greenhouse gas emitters on campus is air-conditioning, because many systems are set to inappropriately high temperatures in winter and inappropriately low temperatures in summer. Increasing or decreasing the temperature to better reflect outside seasonal conditions leads to enormous greenhouse gas savings. Where possible and as we are upgrading buildings throughout Campus, air-conditioning set points of 20-21 degrees in winter and 24-25 degrees in summer are being adopted.

Resources

Learning more about the reasons behind using set points

Case Study

ACTION: Lights are switched off when not in use or natural lighting is sufficient, including in common areas such as kitchens, bathrooms and meeting rooms.

Why do it?

Turning off lights reduces energy consumption and greenhouse emissions. If staff need a reminder, consider prompting with Save Power posters, or contacting Macquarie Sustainability for Turn Off Turn Green stickers.  A LUX meter can help determine the light levels in your department (and may be borrowed by contacting Macquarie University Sustainability). This activity can uncover fantastic energy-saving opportunities by delamping over-lit areas.

Resources

Posters and stickers

Case Study

ACTION: Procedures are in place for powering down energy consumption over holiday periods.

Why do it?

With the University in shut down a few times a year, including Easter, Christmas and public holiday long weekends it is a perfect time for all of us to do a few simple things to save energy, cut costs and reduce greenhouse emissions over the holiday breaks. For information and checklists see 'Turn Off Before Take Off'.

Resources

Turn off before take off

Case Study

Water

ACTION: Save Water posters are placed in a visible location (e.g kitchen, toilets) in department.

Why do it?

Nearly all of us have a good understanding and personal experience with knowing how precious a resource really is. Australia's water supply is usually unreliable, coming in cycles of drought and flood. As such, it is important to ensure our habits and behaviours are towards not wasting this precious resource. In the office, reminders serve as a prompt to staff about saving water. 

Resources

Check out our Resource Centre for posters

Case Study

ACTION: Dishwasher is only used when full.

Why do it?

Before running the dishwasher, wait until you have a full load (same rule of thumb for the clothes washer). This will help make the most of the energy, water, and detergent the machine uses. Loading the dishwasher efficiently helps. In departments, it can be difficult to manage the dishwasher when so many people may (or may not be) using it. Maximize the use of ALL responsible hands in your department with the-"clean/dirty" Save Water dishwasher poster,  designed to keep your department and dishwasher organized. Simply print out the double-sided poster, and magnet or blu-tak to your dishwasher to display whether dishes are clean or dirty.

Resources

Best way to load your dishwasher

Case Study

ACTION: Staff are aware of the procedure for reporting leaks from taps and cisterns on campus.

Why do it?

Leaks can waste a substantial amount of water. It is important to report leaks to the Property team so that they can be attended to as quickly as possible.

Resources

Online Service Request

Case Study

Transport

ACTION: The Department encourages employees to commute to and from campus using more sustainable options such as walking, cycling, public transport and car pooling.

Why do it?

here are many different ways to get to Macquarie University. We encourage people to use sustainable methods of travel where possible - even if for just one day a week. There are regular train and bus services extending to areas right across Sydney. If you live within a few kilometres of the campus, cycling and walking are the most healthy, convenient and cheapest ways to travel to Uni. If you drive, then why not consider carpooling or mixing your travel modes for part of the journey?

Not sure how to get here? Check out our Transport Access Guide.

Resources

Transport Access Guide

Case Study

ACTION: Staff are aware of the Co-Hop app for Macquarie Park area, and where possible actively participate to receive points and rewards.

Why do it?

Using an app such as Co-Hop makes trip planning much easier and way more fun. Co-Hop can log your journeys so that you accrue points towards rewards. It can also help match you to others looking to car pool. It's a system that makes your journey easy to plan, and rewards you for utilising alternative means of transport.

Resources

Case Study

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