Energy and Emissions

Energy and Emissions

Our challenge is to reduce the University's energy use whilst the built infrastructure increases. We have set an ambitious target to achieve a 50% reduction in carbon emissions over 2012 levels by 2030, whilst growth in our operations is projected to increase by 40%.

Energy efficiency means using less energy to achieve the same outcomes. Here on Campus we have implemented considerable energy demand reduction across Campus using a variety of initiatives including:

Solar installation E6B

A 21.12 kW solar PV panel array is installed on the north facing roof at E6B. The system abates 2,300 kg CO2e p.a. and generates an average of 53kWh per day. The panels themselves consist of 96 x 220W photovoltaic modules.

Solar lighting

Solar lighting has been installed in various locations across Campus, including street lighting along Link Road and on the pathway through the Mars Creek wetland.

Solar hot water systems

Where viable, as existing boilers fail solar hot water systems are installed. Current installations include Bike Hubs, X6B Banksia Childcare Centre and W10A Sports & Aquatic Centre.

Off-peak thermal storage tanks

A number of thermal storage tanks are installed across campus (E7A, F7B, E3A, C3C/AHH). Thermal storage tanks chill water overnight and store it for distribution the following day. This means we need less equipment, can chill water when it’s cold outside, take advantage of off-peak energy usage and as a result operate at far greater efficiency.

1.5MW co-generation plant

Our co-generation plant in building C7A is actually a “trigeneration” plant. The waste heat from the University’s co-generation plant is used to generate electricity, to heat water and also to chill water.  The University’s co-generation plant was commissioned in 2001, which makes it one of the first applications of co-generated power outside of heavy industry.

Geothermal heat displacement field - E11A

A geothermal heat displacement field is where boreholes are drilled deep into the earth and outside air is pumped down these holes to be cooled (or heated) by the naturally consistent temperate temperatures underground.

There are 64 holes laid out beneath the grass (and lots of earth and stabilisation material) between E11A and the lake.

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