Colloquia

Colloquia

Our colloquia are held in E7B T2 on Tuesdays beginning at 1:00 pm. Our departmental colloquium series includes speakers from across all physics sub-disciplines, and is intended to be delivered at the senior undergraduate to graduate level, engaging an audience of researchers in areas as diverse as biophysics and astronomy. If arriving from off campus, we are accessible by train – just outside Macquarie Uni station – and paid parking is also available (from $10/hr). For up-to-date announcements about upcoming colloquia, please subscribe to the sci.physics mailing list, our RSS feed, and/or our iCalendar. Information regarding previous colloquia may be found in the left hand navigation bar.

Our Next Talk

02/05/17 – TBA

Lisa Kewley

Australian National University
TBA

Lisa Kewley

Semester 1 Talks

28/02/17 – How the Milky Way Shaped Itself

Hans-Walter Rix

Max Planck Institute for Astronomy
The Milky Way is the only galaxy we can see star-by-star in 3D. This unique wealth of information makes our galaxy an ideal model organism to test our overall concepts of galaxy formation and evolution. Over the last years, new spectroscopic surveys have allowed us to measure the detailed abundances (=birth-material composition) and ages of stars throughout the Galactic disk. I will aim at providing (current) answers to these questions, and sketch out briefly my view of what is yet to come with the unprecedented data from the Gaia satellite mission.

Hans-Walter Rix

28/03/17 – Magnetic Toys in the Sky

Yuri Levin

Monash University
In terrestrial conditions, magnetic fields usually play second fiddle to matter. However, in space magnetic fields can play a decisive role in dynamics of many astrophysical objects. In my talk I will describe two interesting magnetic phenomena that do not have counterparts in terrestrial conditions: 1. Magnetically driven hurricane-like deflagration fronts that are explosively consuming oceans on rapidly spinning neutron stars, and 2. Avalanches of magnetically-induced thermoplastic failures in magnetar crusts that my be connected to the observed activity of magnetars.

Yuri Levin

04/04/17 – THz Hollow-Core Waveguides with Metamaterial Cladding

Shaghik Atakaramians

University of Sydney
An essential component in developing compact terahertz devices are waveguides. Among several waveguide solutions proposed for guiding THz radiation, hollow-core waveguides are one of the best options due to the low losses of THz waves in air. However, these waveguides usually have diameters on the order of several wavelengths and consequently are rigid, multimode pipes for guiding THz radiation rather than flexible fibres. The emergence of metamaterials opens a new avenue to overcome some of the limitations of hollow-core THz waveguides, by providing new guidance mechanisms and extreme birefringence that guide a single polarization. In this presentation, I will discuss our recent work—theoretical, numerical, and experimental demonstrations—on hollow core waveguides with hyperbolic metamaterial cladding. In the THz spectrum such waveguides offer a unique combination of being mechanically flexible, with low optical loss and large single-mode bandwidth.

Shaghik Atakaramians
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