Research by students

Research by students

Current HDR students

Armagan Tayyibe, PhD Candidate

Supervisors:

Dr Noah Bassil, Assoc Prof Morris Morley 

Thesis title:

Politics of flows and controls in the Middle East and North Africa:  The Turkish model as an instrument of control in the face of the Arab spring.

Email: tayyibe.armagan@students.mq.edu.au

Bohan Elise, PhD Candidate

Supervisors:

Professor David Christian, Professor Neil Levy (Philosophy)

Thesis title:

The History and Evolution of Transhumanist Thought and its Significance in the Twenty-first Century: A Big History Perspective

My thesis is part Big History and part traditional history. I weave a comprehensive history of transhumanist thought into a broader big historical research project. The project relies on the macrohistorical concepts of Big History and transhumanism to contextualise the emergence, as well as the core concepts and technologies, of the modern transhumanist movement.

In the first section, I show how big historians and transhumanists make the case for portraying cosmic evolutionary history as an accelerating process. Part two contains a comprehensive history of the contemporary philosophy and cultural movement of transhumanism. Part three builds on the former sections to emphasise that big historians should expand the future-oriented section of their cosmological origin story, with the explicit aim of including a detailed account of transhumanist culture, ideas and technologies.

This project draws Big History, transhumanism, and traditional history together, and encourages modern humans to think in new and creative ways about how they fit into a larger universe. It also encourages us to think about how we will confront the novel challenges and opportunities of an age in which cultural evolution and technological disruption are rampant, and ever accelerating.

Publications

  • Empiricism is not a Dirty Word. Origins 6.1 (2015): 3-6.

Conference Papers

  • Big History, Transhumanism, and the Future of Human Evolution (forthcoming). Genes to Geoscience Outlook Conference. Sydney, July 2016.
  • Transhumanism: A New Avenue for Threshold 9 Research? (forthcoming). International Big History Association Conference: Building Big History Research and Teaching. Amsterdam, July 2016.
  • Rethinking Humanity in an Age of Accelerating Change. The Big History Anthropocene Conference: A Transdisciplinary Exploration. Sydney, December 2015.
  • Big History, Technology and Transhumanism: Shaping the Future by Looking to the Past. NewMac Humanities Postgraduate Symposium. Sydney, May 2015.

Email: elise.bohan@students.mq.edu.au

Burkett Melanie, PhD candidate

Supervisor:

Dr Tanya Evans

Thesis title:

Impressions That Stick: A Critical Examination of Assisted Immigrants’ Much Maligned Reputation

My thesis examines negative discourses about the “quality” of the earliest government-assisted immigrants to New South Wales. In the mid-1830s, the Australian colonies began using the proceeds of land sales to defray the travel costs of immigrants from the United Kingdom. The immigrants were sorely needed in order to address a high demand for labour, but much anxiety existed around the quality of people the colonies would receive. Would British authorities use assisted emigration as a method for ridding the home country of its most destitute subjects? The colonies feared so and, for over one hundred fifty years, Australian migration historiography reflected those concerns.

In my thesis, I interrogate the complex public and political discourses related to immigration and position them within the developing social order the colonial elite were attempting to establish. What do condemnations of the morality of these immigrants reveal about notions of class and gender? About insecurities stemming from the colony’s convict past? How do they relate to colonial leaders’ quest for legitimacy in the eyes of the mother country? And why were such views unquestionably repeated in the historiography for so long?

Email: melanie.burkett@mq.edu.au OR melanie.burkett@students.mq.edu.au

Coombs David, PhD Candidate

Supervisor:

Prof Stephanie Lawson

Thesis title:

Ideology behind the Northern Territory intervention

Email: david.coombs@students.mq.edu.au

Del-Grosso Marc-Olivier, PhD Candidate

Supervisor:

Dr Ian Tregenza

Thesis title:

The perception of Islam by political parties: A comparative analysis of the Rhetorical and perceptive schemes used in Austalia and France

Email: marc-olivier.del-grosso@students.mq.edu.au

Della Gatta Marisa , PhD Candidate

Supervisors:

Dr Noah Bassil, Prof Marion Maddox

Thesis title:

Syria in the Mirror: Identity and ethno-politics in Syria and Syrian diaspora

This project aims to investigate the political dimension of Syrian identity by assessing the different theories regarding group identity and ethno-politics. Applying concepts enunciated by Doornbos (1991) to Syrian society, I argue that ethnicity is not a factor for political instability and social separateness in Syria. On the contrary, political inequality and incoherence causes fragmentation out of ethno-religious labels.

Research questions include: to what extent are Syrian minorities “compact” (Rabinovich 1979)? Is Syrian society composed of isolated blocks, for such incomprehensive, intolerant and hate generating? Does Syrian identity politics reflect Syrian identity? In order to assume a view from below, I seek evidence from diaspora Syrian groups residing in Australia and Armenia. The two countries represent ideal indirect grounds, because of the (co)- existence of Syria-related diaspora communities. I firmly believe that le literature on Syria has to be integrated by social research from below. In particular, I focus on inter-communal and state-society relations in Syria considering the dichotomy minority/majority as a category of practice, to use Brubaker’s definition (Brubaker 2013

Publications:
  • Dante tra Oriente e Occidente (Dante between the West and the East)[in Italian], FalVision, 2014.
  • “Syrian in the mirror: media definitions of the Syrian Conflict.” NewMac journal (forthcoming).
Conference Papers:
  • “Two sides of the coin in the contribution of religious communities to the Syrian conflict”, UNSW Arts and Social Sciences Postgraduate Conference, Sydney, July 2015;
  • “Syrian in the mirror: media representations of the Syrian Conflict”, NewMac Postgraduate Symposium, Sydney, July 2015.
  • “Projections on the diaspora of Syrian Armenians in Armenia, BRISMES Conference, Lampeter (Wales, UK), Jul y 2016.

Email: marisa.della-gatta@students.mq.edu.au

Dellagiacoma Michelle , PhD Candidate

Supervisors: 

A/ Professor Geoffrey Hawker and Prof Marion Maddox

Thesis title

Public Policy and Services: An analysis of strategic rationale and service outcomes

Government policy and services are based on the strategic rationale of government. This strategic framework is a result of departmental portfolio responsibilities, budget allocations and key political and community interests.

Michelle's PhD will analyse the process of strategic policy development using an evaluative problem identification approach to track the progress of key strategic ideas from their initial broad policy statements through to their service frameworks and measures of tangible outcomes. This analysis will include an incorporation of key stakeholder advice and leading international political trends and theories to determine the underlying strategic rationale in the area of care.

The efficacy of the underlying strategic rationale will be assessed within the context of international trends and measured against core political theories to determine whether the strategic premise is logical and achieves both the stated outcomes required by government and efficiency and equity for families.

Qualitative research on the experience of families will be undertaken to provide an evidence base for the strategic discussion, including asking families what they value in their own lives, and what criteria for services they value.

Email: michelle.dellagiacoma@students.mq.edu.au  Or:  mdnow7@gmail.com

Dick Robert, PhD candidate

Supervisors:

Dr Mark Hearn, A/Prof Michelle Arrow

Thesis title:

Communism in Australia/The Reception and Rejection of Communism

The success of the revolution in Russia that installed a Communist Government seemed to many in Australia and elsewhere, to offer an alternative system of government more responsive to the needs of ordinary people. It was a system perceived to offer a release from capitalist oppression through action by a revolutionary proletariat. The Depression of the 1930s and 40s was seen as the final crisis of capitalism and the Communist Party in Australia the means to deliver the final blow. Party membership grew rapidly during the 1930s and 40s as the Communists claimed that they truly represented the workers and the large number of unemployed but membership fell rapidly in the 1950s.

This research is aimed at reaching a clearer understanding of why so many people embraced Communism only later to reject it. Reasons for the rejection are expected to go beyond the crises in Czechoslovakia and the uprising in Hungary and Khrushchev's denunciation of Stalin, often given as reasons for people leaving the Party. While these alone are regarded as reason enough it is proposed that it has more to do with the failure of the idea. This is the focus of the research; it is not a history of the Communist Party of Australia.

The power and influence of the anti-communist propaganda and where it came from will be assessed for its effect and a brief look at Canada's experience will enable a comparison to be made to see if there was anything different about Australia's brush with communism.

This different approach will give those people who at the time genuinely believed Marx's system preferable to a capitalist one the opportunity to say why. When viewed in the environment of the time perhaps then our understanding of that part of our history becomes more complete. That would be the ideal outcome of this research.

Dowling Daniel, PhD Candidate

Supervisor:

Dr Jakob Timmer 

Thesis title:

The Mega-Movement: The construction of a global megachurch culture (to be confirmed).

Email: daniel.dowling@students.mq.edu.au

Flack Kylie, PhD candidate

Supervisors:

A/Prof Michelle Arrow, Dr Hsu-Ming Teo

Thesis title:

Consuming History in Childhood: The Australian Junior Historical Novel as Part of an Evolving History Marketplace, 1945 to the Present

Biographical details
Kylie Flack is a third year PhD candidate in the Department of Modern History, Politics and International Relations at Macquarie University. Her key research interests revolve around Australian historical products for children and the notion of developing new approaches to historiography.
Kylie has completed undergraduate and postgraduate studies in both history and sociology and is using this academic background to explore the construction and presentation of history for children in Australia since World War II, with an emphasis on historical fiction. She comes to her PhD candidature after working as a policy analyst and researcher in the Australian government sector for 15 years and aspires to some day become a published author of historical fiction for children.

Conference Papers:

'Children 'on the Road' in Australian Junior Historical Fiction since 1945: an historiographical perspective', Australian Literature: The Road Ahead Conference, Sydney, Australia, June 2013

'Challenging Childhoods: Representations of Conflict in Australian Junior Historical Fiction since 1945', The Fourth Asian Conference on Literature and Librarianship, Osaka, Japan, April 2014

'Representations of Conflict in Australian Junior Historical Fiction Since 1945', Australian Historical Association Conference, Brisbane, Australia, July 2014

Hawkings Rebecca, PhD candidate

Supervisors:

A/Prof Michelle Arrow, Dr. Leigh Boucher

Thesis title:

Star-Crossed Citizens: Discursive Constructions of National Identity in Australian Popular Music Cultures, 1972-2012

What makes a song, an artist, or a music genre 'Australian'? Existing literature cites lyrical and compositional devices as key to understanding music as 'Australian'; specifically, the narratives told in Cold Chisel's 'Khe Sahn' and GANGajang's 'Sounds of Then (This Is Australia),' for example, and the amplified, blues-derived hard rock sound dominant in locally-produced music from the 1970s onwards. But merely singing about Australia and/or (re)producing a specific rock music sound only tells a very small part of the story. Combining history methodology with musicology and cultural studies, my thesis is an interdisciplinary examination of the discourses and spaces that have shaped the recognition of popular music as somehow uniquely 'Australian' - or, just as importantly, as not. Using the archive of music press, this research project explores how historically specific discourses of gender, sexuality, race, and space have shaped understandings of national identity in popular music cultures from 1972 to 2012.
Twitter: @bechawkings

Publications:

- Arrow, Michelle and Hawkings, Rebecca. 'Love Is In The Air?: Romantic Love in Australian Popular Music' in Hsu-Ming Teo (ed.) Romantic Love In Australian Popular Culture (forthcoming 2015)
- Gunn, Rachael and Hawkings, Rebecca. '(Re)producing 'Australianness' in Popular Music: The Case of Oz Rock and Australian Hip Hop,' The Australasian Journal of Popular Culture (forthcoming 2015)
- Hawkings, Rebecca. 'Paul Keating's Creative Nation: a policy document that changed us,' The Conversation, Thursday 30th October 2014: http://theconversation.com/paul-keatings-creative-nation-a-policy-document-that-changed-us-33537
- Hawkings, Rebecca. 'Why the Coalition's victory is a pain in the arts,' FasterLouder, Friday 20th September 2013:http://www.fasterlouder.com.au/opinions/36999/Why-the-Coalitions-victory-is-a-pain-in-the-arts
- Hawkings, Rebecca. 'Art For (High) Art's Sake,' Australian Policy and History (September 2013): http://aph.org.au/art-for-high-art%E2%80%99s-sake
- Hawkings, Rebecca. "'The Light On The Hill': Chifley, Keating, and a new interpretation of Labor Party rhetoric," NEO : journal for higher degree research in the social sciences and humanities, Vol. 5, (2012), pp. 1-13.

Conference papers:

- Hawkings, Rebecca. '"Australia's answer to Nirvana are going through some changes": Silverchair's Neon Ballroom and the queered masculinity of Australian post-grunge rock music.' International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM-ANZ) Annual Conference, 5th-7th December, 2014, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
- Hawkings, Rebecca. '"Sheilas and Pooftas": Hyper-Heteromasculinity in 1970s Australian Music Cultures.' 9th Annual Limina: A Journal of Historical and Cultural Studies Conference, 20th June 2014, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
- Hawkings, Rebecca. '"More Arse Than Class": Unpacking the 'Oz' in 'Oz Rock'.' Modern History HDR Conference, 13th June 2014, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
- Hawkings, Rebecca. '"You only get two days as an Australian to be patriotic - Australia Day and Homebake": Australian music festivals and cultural nationalism, from Sunbury to Soundwave,' Tethering The Past, 28th - 29th November 2013, University of Sydney, Australia
- Hawkings, Rebecca. '"Nirvana In Pyjamas": Australian Post-Grunge Rock Music and National Identity Narratives, 1994-1999,' Royal Australian Historical Society 'History Is Hot' series, 9th October 2013, History House, Sydney, Australia.
- Hawkings, Rebecca. '"It proved to be my nemesis": ABBA, Australia, and reading (inter)national identity in Australian popular music,' Popular Culture Association of Australia and New Zealand Annual Conference, 24th - 26th June 2013, Brisbane, Australia.
- Hawkings, Rebecca. '"It proved to be my nemesis": ABBA, Australia, and reading (inter)national identity in Australian popular music,' Modern History HDR Conference, 24th May 2013, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
- Hawkings, Rebecca. '"(You Know You Make Me Wanna) Shout!": Australian Music's Counter-Discourse of National Identity,' NewMac Conference, 2nd March 2013, University of Newcastle, Australia.
- Hawkings, Rebecca. 'Pop Culture and Politics in Australia, 1950-2007: A Literature Review,' Modern History HDR Conference, 18th May 2012, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
- Hawkings, Rebecca. 'Like Banquo's Ghost: Chifley, Keating, and Labor Party rhetoric,' Macquarie University Honours and Higher Degree Research Arts Conference, 18th November 2011, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.

Hore Jarrod, PhD Candidate

Supervisors:

Dr Kate Fullagar, Dr Leigh Boucher

Thesis title:

Visions of nature: Settler colonial photography and wilderness in the late nineteenth century

My thesis examines the relationship between environmental consciousness and settler colonialism in the late nineteenth century. Settler colonies at this time were partly shaped by a tension between the extensive environmental degradation caused by colonisation and the simultaneous production of a wealthy urban society advocating discourses of environmental consciousness. By using a cultural historical lens to investigate the nexus between a set of historical events - shifts in perceptions of nature, the consumption of landscape, and the development of photographic technology - my dissertation will explore how those living in nineteenth-century settler societies related to nature, which in turn contributed to the origins of modern environmental consciousness.

While many of the specific histories of new visions of nature in Pacific Rim Anglo settler societies have developed provincially, the shared histories of these societies make a comparative investigation essential. Composing a story of connections and resonances in the Tasman world is a crucial objective of this project, but another, equally important objective is the application of a kind of critical imperial analysis to the history of new visions of American nature on the West Coast. My dissertation uses comparative methodology to place contemporaneous development of nature reserves alongside one another in order to understand environmental consciousness as a settler colonial phenomenon.

A history of the preservationist moment in Anglo settler colonies will also provide an opportunity to consider how aesthetic innovations - effected by nature photography - were implicated in various settler colonial projects in the Pacific Rim geographies of Australia, New Zealand and the West Coast of America.  

Twitter: @jarrodhore

Publications:

-‘”Beautiful Tasmania’: Environmental consciousness in John Watt Beattie’s romantic wilderness’ History Australia (forthcoming)

Conference papers:

-Comparative Environmental History and Settler Colonialism in Yosemite and Tasmania

-American Society for Environmental History Conference, Seattle (2016)

-‘”’Playground of Australia’: The intimate landscape of the photographer-explorer in colonial Tasmania

-Foreign Bodies, Intimate Ecologies: Transformations in Environmental History, Macquarie University (2016)

- Environmental consciousness in John Watt Beattie's foundational vision of Tasmanian nature  
- Australian Historical Association Conference, University of Sydney (2015)

Li Lu, PhD Candidate

Supervisors:

Prof Stephanie Lawson, Dr Stephen Wood

Thesis title:

Conceptualising Asia in International Relations: A Critical Analysis.

Email:lu.li4@students.mq.edu.au

MacGillivray Morwenna, PhD candidate

Supervisor:

Dr Leigh  Boucher 

Thesis title:

A comparative study of the experiences of senior female leaders in the different armed forces of the UK, US and Australia.

Email: morwenna.macgillivray@students.mq.edu.au

McCormack Alan, PhD Candidate

Supervisor:

Dr Jonathan Symons

Thesis title:

Is Indonesia a "default location" for inward FDI?  What role do Australian MNE's play?

Email: alan.mccormack@students.mq.edu.au

McIlwain David, PhD Candidate

Supervisors:

Dr Ian Tregenza , Assoc Prof Aleksandar Pavkovic

Thesis title:

Michael Oakeshott and Leo Strauss on the Individual

The Englishman Michael Oakeshott (1901 – 1990) and the naturalized American Leo Strauss (1899 – 1973) are routinely discussed as influential conservatives of the Twentieth Century. Yet both men were philosophers dedicated to understanding the deepest traditions of human individuality. The different individualities which they recovered were as demanding as they were untimely, and the philosophical ground of their affinities has not yet been fully investigated. I aim to reveal Oakeshott and Strauss as conservatives only in the sense that they were concerned with conserving earlier, pre-modern enlightenments and renaissances while focused on this shared theme of human individuality. This allowed them to find a unique position in modern political thought, distinct from both counter-Enlightenment reaction and Enlightenment progressivism. As such their philosophies suggest an individualistic horizon beyond the contemporary liberal system of thought.

Email: david.mcilwain@students.mq.edu.au

McLaren Jennifer, PhD Candidate

Supervisors:

Dr Kate Fullagar, Dr Tanya Evans

Thesis title:

Irish-Caribbean Connections, c.1750-1830

My thesis will investigate the extent, and character, of Irish engagement with the British empire in the Caribbean during the second half of the eighteenth century, through the period termed by Christopher Bayly the "imperial meridian." Irish sojourners and settlers in the Caribbean were involved in the project of empire in many ways, just as their English and Scottish counterparts were. My research will investigate a number of these spheres of engagement, focusing on the experiences of individuals or groups. A biographical and microhistorical approach will be used to illuminate the networks and connections which developed between Ireland and the British empire in the Caribbean. The thesis aims to contribute to the growing body of scholarship which examines Irish history through the lens of empire, as well as the field of Irish Atlantic studies, with a focus on the Caribbean.

Conference papers:

"Celebrating the Battle of the Saintes: Imperial News in England and Ireland, 1782." Paper given at the British Society for Eighteenth Century Studies, Annual Postgraduate and Early Career Scholars Conference, Belfast, July 2015.

McMullan Rachel J , PhD Candidate

Supervisors:

Dr Tanya Evans 

Thesis title:

The Mullances: A trans-generational biography of an 'Australian' family from the 1850s

Email: rachel.mcmullan@students.mq.edu.au

Monnox Christopher William, PhD Candidate

Supervisor:

Assoc Prof Geoffrey Hawker 

Thesis title:

Federal Election Campaigns in rural New South Wales and Victoria; 1910 - 1969

Email: christopher-william.monnox@students.mq.edu.au

Napton Daniella, PhD Candidate

Supervisor:

Assoc Prof Geoffrey Hawker 

Thesis title:

Tory Political Theory and Constitutional Monarchy as Represented in the Early Fiction of Benjamin Disraeli

Email: daniela.napton@students.mq.edu.au

Poulos Elenie, PhD Candidate

Supervisor:

Prof Marion Maddox 

Thesis title:

Public theology and moral voices: Christian advocacy for human rights.

Email: elenie.poulos@students.mq.edu.au

Smith Cameron, PhD Candidate

Supervisors:

Dr Noah Bassil, Dr Benjamin Spies-Butcher

Thesis title:

Decolonising Antipodean Multiculturalism

Email: cameron.smith5@students.mq.edu.au

Shanahan Mairead , PhD Candidate

Supervisor:
Thesis title:

The influence of conservative Pentecostal Christian groups on Australian federal politics: A Castoriadian Analysis.

Email: mairead.shanahan@students.mq.edu.au

Torrisi Luke, PhD Candidate

Supervisor:

Dr IanTregenza

Thesis title:

The anxieties of conservative mind in the 21st century through the lens of Dystopia

Email: luke.torrisi@students.mq.edu.au

Hawkins Katharine, PhD candidate

Supervisor:

Dr Monagle Clare  

Thesis title:

The other woman: the sociology of the female monster

Email: katharine.hawkins@students.mq.edu.au

Cameron Nunn, PhD Candidate

Supervisors:

A/Prof Robert Reynolds, Dr Tanya Evans

Thesis title:

Children in Chains - Child Convicts from 1787 to 1834

Description: Not many people realise that during the convict period, Britain unloaded around 25,000 juveniles onto the new colony. In an environment where heavy labour, agricultural skills and trades were the necessities to the survival of the infant settlement, it raises the question, "What on earth were they thinking?" The majority of juvenile transportees were sent after 1834 when a purpose built establishment was set up at Point Puer, near Port Arthur. However, a significant number were sent before this, to a colony that completely unsuited and ill-prepared to receive young convicts. My thesis seeks to examine the legal and cultural understandings that led to the transportation of children and the experiences of child transportees in these early years.

Email: cameron.nunn@students.mq.edu.au

Christin Quirk, PhD Candidate

Supervisors:

Dr Leigh Boucher

Thesis title:

Mothers in Women-Centred Families: 1969-2008

In Australia, contemporary debates about family and motherhood hang on the static notion of a ‘traditional’ nuclear family. This ideal is fixed to a rigid ‘1950s’ view that is ahistorical. While the nuclear family model remains a prominent family form, an ever-increasing number of families can no longer be defined within these strictures. These ‘alternative’ families present a direct challenge to the belief that the heterosexual nuclear family characterises an unchanging norm. Since the late 1960s, social reforms and social trends have resulted in more single parent, step and blended, multiple household and same-sex families. Despite such findings, beliefs about an immutable ideal of family remain prominent, particularly within neoliberal political discourse. With a focus on the imagined consequences of the absent father, such rhetoric claims the intention of attending to the ‘best interest of the child’. However, concerns about so-called ‘fatherless families’ fundamentally act to reinforce (hetero)normative notions of motherhood and the conception of the Australian family as a patriarchal institution in which women remain economically dependent on men.  Using oral history, this thesis considers the impact of persistent idealised representations and discourses of the ‘traditional’ family on the experience of mothers in women-centred families. More specifically, this research explores how single and/or lesbian mothers have lived the political, social, and cultural transformations of the period 1969 to 2008.

Publications:

- “Historicizing the Marginalization of Single Mothers: 
an Australian Perspective,” in Motherhood and Lone/Single Parenting: A 21st Century Perspective, edited by Maki Motapanyane. Bradford: Demeter Press, forthcoming 2016.

- “Past Adoption Practices and the Politics of Apology,” Australian Policy and History, (http://aph.org.au/past-adoption-practices-and-the-politics-of-apology), February 2013.

- “The Business of Adoption: Past Practices at the Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne,” Lilith: a Feminist History Journal, 19, (2013): 46-59.

- “Never-married Women Versus the Records: Archives, Testimony and the History of Adoption Practices,” Melbourne Historical Journal, vol. 40, (2012): 169-183.

- “‘And the Other Thing Was...’ The Reciprocal Interview Relationship and the Impact of ‘Unconnected’ Traumatic Memories,” Oral History Association of Australia Journal, No.34, (2012): 47-53.

Conference papers:

- “Single and Lesbian Mothers: Narratives of Resistance and Change.” Paper presented at the Oral History Association (OHA) Annual Meeting: Stories of Social Change and Social Justice, Tampa, 14-18 October 2015.

- “‘The Right Order of Things’: Conservative Politics, Liberal Public Sentiment and the Experiences of Lesbian Mothers in Contemporary Australia.” Paper presented at the 18th International Oral History Association Conference: Power and Democracy: the Many Voices of Oral History, Barcelona, 9-12 July 2014.

Email: christin.quirk@students.mq.edu.au

Sarian Emma, PhD Candidate

Supervisor:

Dr. Leigh Boucher

Thesis title:

A history of human rights in Australia

The study of human rights discourse as a historical phenomenon is a relatively new and increasingly popular field of research that seeks to understand, ultimately, the ways in which this discourse has come to dominate the language of political claims-making in the contemporary world. The ascendance of human rights discourse, while often explored in terms of the European or North American traditions, is no less true of the Australian case, where contemporary issues as varied as refugee resettlement, gay marriage and domestic violence are all expressed as demands on the grounds of human rights. To understand the modern-day ubiquity of human rights discourse, historians have sought to trace the development of political and philosophical traditions that assert in various ways the rights accorded to human beings by the sole virtue of being human. This thesis looks to contribute to this work by focusing on the Australian experience with the aim of, firstly, identifying the transformational period in which human rights discourse came to supersede other types of rights-claiming language and, secondly, suggesting the possible reasons for this transformation.

Conference papers:

'Governments Imagining Their Citizens: Figures of Exclusion From Hawke to Howard', Australian Historical Association Conference. University of Sydney, July 2015.
'Governments Imagining Their Citizens: Figures of Exclusion in Australian Migrant Policy', Space, Race, Bodies: Geocorpographies of City, Nation, Empire. University of Otago, December 20

Email: emma.sarian@students.mq.edu.au

Saartje Tack, PhD Candidate

Supervisors:

Dr Leigh Boucher, Prof Nick Mansfield

Thesis title:

Suicide: Interrogating the Prevention Narrative

My thesis will provide a critical intervention in and question common conceptualisations of suicide. Many accounts of suicide, scholarly and other, are grounded in and structured around a narrative of prevention, and this seems only natural. Suicide is continuously framed as a problem that must be overcome, and the naturalness of suicide as something that must be prevented is rarely questioned. In my thesis, I will argue that knowledge about suicide is not self-evident, natural or neutral, but is the effect of a number of discourses. I will explore the ways in which the prevention narrative frames suicide, with regards to agency and choice, suffering and happiness, victimisation and pathologisation, and consequently, the 'normal'. My thesis is not interested in preventing suicide, nor in the reasons for which individuals commit suicide. Rather, it will explore the ways in which suicide is framed, interpreted, and represented, and as such it is interested in the discourses the prevention narrative generates, reinforces and/or excludes.

Publications:

Tack, Saartje. "Flouting the Law. Underbelly: Razor's (De)Construction of Normative
Femininity." Macquarie Matrix 4:1 (2014). 138-149.

Tack, Saartje. "(Ab)Using Matrilineality: Fingersmith and the Formation of Identity Fictions." Macquarie Matrix 3:2 (2013). 52-63.

Conference papers:

"The Violence of Rigid Categorisation: Trans(ing) (Re)Presentations of Eugenia Falleni, 1920-today." INSEP2015 - Violence, Representations and Sexuality. Ghent University. Ghent, Belgium. 13-15 July 2015.

"Eugenia Falleni: Transing Trans." Limina Conference: Think Forward, Look Back. The University of Western Australia. Perth. 18-19 June 2015.

"Flouting the Law. Underbelly: Razor's (De)Construction of Normative Femininity." Australasian Conference for Undergraduate Research (ACUR). Macquarie University. Sydney. 19-20 September 2013.

Email: saartje-estella.tack@students.mq.edu.au

Vaughan Daniel , PhD Candidate

Supervisors:

Assoc Reynolds Robert  Dr Jennings Rebecca 

Thesis title:

Memories from Exile - An oral history of a queer Australian Diaspora.

Email: daniel.vaughan@students.mq.edu.au

Vogt Richard, PhD Candidate

Supervisors:

Dr Loyd Cox Lloyd, Dr Jumana Bayeh

Thesis title:

The Politics of Borders in the Twenty-First Century: A Responsibility to Protect Privilege

Email: richard.vogt@students.mq.edu.au

Wainscott Matthew, PhD Candidate

Supervisors:

Dr Lloyd Cox,  Assoc Prof Morris Morley 

Thesis title:

Class Politics and Neoliberal Reform in Mubarak's Egypt

Email: matthew.wainscott@students.mq.edu.au

Ware Cheryl , PhD Candidate

Supervisor:

Dr Shirleene Robinson

Thesis title:

HIV Illness Narratives in New South Wales: The significance of the changing social experiences of HIV-positive homosexual men between 1982 and 1996

My thesis uses oral history to examine the diverse ways homosexual men both remember and convey their past experiences of living with HIV as a terminal illness in the 1980s and 1990s. While scholars have conducted significant and valuable research into Australia's proactive political responses to the epidemic, how gay men dealt with HIV in their personal lives remains underexplored by historians. Drawing on life narrative interviews I have conducted with twenty five HIV-positive gay men, this thesis recasts histories of HIV and AIDS in Australia to focus specifically on people living with HIV, and analyses the individual subjectivity and collective memories inherent in life narratives.


Publications:
  • Cheryl Ware, "'Us' Versus 'Them': Oral History as a Forum for HIV-Positive Homosexual Men to Challenge Memories of Shame, 1984-1997," Oral History in New Zealand (forthcoming)
  • Cheryl Ware, "HIV Illness Narratives in New Zealand: The Significance of the Experiences of HIV Positive Homosexual Men Between 1983 and 1997," Health and History, 15 no. 2 (2013): 93-111.
Conference papers:
  • 'Illness and Life Narratives: Investigating the Significance of the Changing Social Experiences of HIV-Positive Homosexual Men in Sydney between 1982 and 1997,' paper presented at National Oral History Association of New Zealand Annual Conference, Wellington, September 2014.
  • 'Finding A Voice: Representations of HIV-Positive Homosexual Men in the 1980s Gay Press,' paper presented at Australian Historical Association 33rd Annual Conference, Brisbane, July 2014.
  • 'Illness Narratives: HIV-Positive Homosexual Men in New Zealand,' paper presented at Australian Historical Association 32nd Annual Conference, Wollongong, July 2013.

Email: cheryl.ware@students.mq.edu.au

Past HDR Students

Dr David Baker

Supervisors:

Prof David Christian, Dr Nicholas Baker

Thesis title:

Mechanica Historica: Longue Durée Cycles, the Darwinian Algorithm, and Collective Learning in French Population History

An interdisciplinary examination of the influence of population dynamics and collective learning on historical development, after the tradition of the French Annales school of Ladurie and Braudel, but with a Big History twist. The thesis explores the rise of human complexity through our development as a species and the two revolutions of agriculture and industry, using France from the fall of the Roman Empire to modern day as a 'case study'. Long cycles in history are examined through the lens of ecological theories devised by my collaborators in the natural sciences to explain what makes humans different, what broad trends underlie history, and how we explain the vast explosion of innovation and complexity over a relatively short period of our species' existence. It turns out there may be patterns in population and collective learning that can be distinguished, charted, and empirically examined via historical evidence. These patterns are examined in the context of the Darwinian algorithm and the apparent rise of complexity, despite the tyranny of entropy and thermodynamics, from structures as relatively simple as stars and galaxies to something as complex as organic life and human society, which possess 10,000 to 500,000 times the free energy rate density and are the most complex regimes in the known universe. This study of the plus longue durée will attempt to shed light on why.

Publications:
  • David Baker, '10500: The Darwinian Algorithm as a New Research Agenda in Big History' in Barry Rodrigue, Leonid Grinin, Andrey Korotayev, (eds.) From Big Bang to Global Civilisation: A Big History Anthology, (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2013).
  • David Baker, 'The Roman Dominate from the Perspective of Demographic-Structural Theory' in Cliodynamics 2 (2011): 217-251.
  • David Baker, 'On Human Evolution in History: The Case of France' in International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social Sciences 6.7 (2011): 51-62.

Dr Chelsea Barnett

Supervisors:

A/Prof Robert Reynolds, Dr Leigh Boucher

Thesis title:

Masculinity in Australian Film, 1949-1962

My thesis explores the way in which Australian films from the fifties represented and understood models of masculinity as they functioned in the postwar period. The fifties are often burdened by popular images of stability and complacency, represented most commonly by former Prime Minister Robert Menzies. In contrast to these images, however, the fifties were also the years in which radical nationalist intellectuals not only flourished, but understood and celebrated a model of masculinity that was in many ways the antithesis to that which Menzies espoused. My thesis uses Australian film to explore how the postwar cultural landscape made sense of these multiple, competing masculinities as they functioned in the fifties. In doing so, my thesis aims to move beyond the dominant perception of the fifties as a time of sleepy inactivity. Furthermore, the use of a significantly overlooked archive - Australian postwar films - allows for my thesis to explore how the cultural landscape of the fifties actively engaged with and attempted to represent these multiple masculinities. My thesis will contribute to existing scholarship on Australian film, gender and cultural history, and the Australian postwar years more generally.

Publications:
  • "Man's Man: Representations of Australian Postwar Masculinity in Man Magazine." Journal of Australian Studies (forthcoming).
  • Book Review - "Mad Men, Mad World: Sex, Politics, Style and the 1960s." Media International Australia, 151 (2014): 196-97.
Conference Papers:
  • "Mates, or More? Male Sexuality in Summer of the Seventeenth Doll." Paper given at Australian Historical Association 33rd Annual Conference, Brisbane, July 2014
  • "Swaggies and Suburbia: Masculinity in The Shiralee (1957)." Paper given at Australian Historical Association 32nd Annual Conference, Wollongong, July 2013.
  • "Men in Film: Constituting Male Subjectivity in The Shiralee (1957)." Paper given at NewMac Postgraduate Conference, Newcastle, March 2013.

Dr Rich Blundell

Supervisors:

Prof David Christian, Dr Yuji Sone (Dept. of Media, Music, Communication and Cultural Studies)

Thesis title:

Coming of Age in the Cosmos: Big History and the Mythic Dimensions of Science

(An interdepartmental thesis-by-publication with creative practice)

Big History is an emerging field that seeks to reveal and explain the interconnections between Earth, Life and Humanity within a cosmic context. Proponents of Big History include history scholars, scientists, educators, and cultural theorists, who make various claims about its compelling promise to solve some of the most challenging problems facing humanity. My research critically examines Big History by testing these claims and applying the findings to a creative practice.

To address the research questions I have developed a multifaceted approach that explores Big History from personal to cultural levels. My thesis first seeks to discover and articulate what the Big History paradigm is. Preliminary theoretical work and thematic analysis of interviews with several experts has established a scholarly consensus on its scope, value, and potential. The next challenge is to understand the lived-experience of Big History on the personal level. To do this I designed a phenomenological study of students enrolled in university-level Big History courses in order to elucidate the cognitive and affective processes involved in learning the narrative of cosmic evolution. This empirical phase also draws on the influential ideas of the American educational philosopher, John Dewey, who theorized extensively on the cultural impact of aesthetic experiences of art and nature. Understanding what Big History means on a personal level should suggest how the lived-experience might ultimately translate to culture and thus shed light on the validity of the claims of proponents.

With supervision from the Department of Media, Music, Communication & Cultural Studies, the results of this study and the overall results will be applied to the design and creation of a final creative practice.

Papers:
  • Rich Blundell, Culture as Journeywork: And Introduction to Big Culture, Section Intro. in Anthology of Big History, University of California Press (In Press)
  • Rich Blundell Book Review of Deep Time: The Architecture of Past and Present in Journal of World History: (In Press)
  • Rich Blundell, Communicating Science: A Novel Frame of Reverence, Ed.M. Thesis, State University of New York, New York, (2009).
Conference Presentations:
  • Big History: Big Potential, poster presented at the Gordon Research Conferences; Visualization in Science & Education: Transformation by Visualization: Radical Effects on Learning in Science and Across Education, July 2011.
  • Science and Humanities: Bridging the Two Culture Divide, paper presented at Florida Gulf Coast University Conference Humanities and Sustainability: Ecology in the Information Age, May 2009.
  • Communicating Science: A Novel Frame of Reverence presentation at the Bristol Natural History Consortium Communicate'08 Messages for Change conference Sept. 2008.
  • Scientists for Global Responsibility Conference poster presentation, London 2008.

Crowley Michael

Supervisors:

Prof Stephanie Lawson Stephanie,   Assoc Colin Wastell

Thesis title:

After Nine Eleven 2001: Politics, Law and Australian Democracy

Dr Elisa deCourcy

Supervisor:

Dr Hsu-Ming Teo

Thesis title:

The Photographic Encounter: The Construction of Difference and Distinction in the Early Twentieth Century English Travelogue

Elisa's research examines the role and communicative potential of photographic illustrations in early twentieth century English travelogues based on excursions to Africa and Asia. Looking particularly at photographs of people, she investigates how important pictures were in creating narrative subjectivities for the English author and the European and indigenous people they encountered on travels. She posits her evaluation of portraits and snapshots from travelogue genre within a broader nineteenth and early twentieth century context where photography was used in numerous public and private contexts as a record, an item of posterity and an index of character. She analyses the specific archive of travelogue photographs from the British colonial world with reference to other forms of portraiture used in the legal system, medical diagnostics and scientific research, as well as social portraiture more generally. Her project is grounded on the photograph's overwhelming nineteenth and early twentieth century function as a tool for 'documenting' distinction and difference. Her research is focused on interrogating how people were 'encountered' through the photographic medium and how identities were consolidated in the first century of this technology's circulation.

Publications & Conference Papers:
  • Elisa deCourcy, 'Just a Grain of Salt?: Symbolic Construction During the Indian Nationalist Movement' in Melbourne Historical Journal 38 (2010): 61-77.
  • Elisa deCourcy, 'The Photographed Self: Picturing Englishness, Masculinity and Exceptionality in the Early Twentieth Century Travelogue' at The Travel Ideals Conference: Engaging with Spaces of Mobility. Melbourne, 2012.

Dr Bruce Dennett 

Supervisor:

Dr Alison Holland

Thesis title:

The Genesis of Cinematic Images of Indigenous Australia

My research has focused on the nature and origins of the Indigenous images and character stereotypes that emerged in Australian cinema from the earliest days of silent film. To date the literature has addressed Aboriginality in film from the 1950s to the 21st century, without serious consideration of the genesis of those images during the prolific and dynamic era of Australian silent film. The research therefore is designed to address a significant gap in the study of Aboriginality in film.

Although there have been sections in books on Australian feature films devoted to Indigenous Australians there has been no single, comprehensive study. The silent films of the early twentieth century in particular has been neglected and /or forgotten. There have been essays and journal articles, addressing film, Aboriginality and history, and although these have been more frequent of late, there is still no Australian publication to compare with works on the Native American or African American cinematic representations of another settler society, the United States.

In terms of the strong American influence on Australian filmmakers, the 'accepted wisdom' has been inclined to privilege analogies between the cinematic modes of representation of Native Americans and Indigenous Australians, a strong case however is emerging from my research for the value of comparisons between African Americans and Indigenous Australians.

The history of Australia's cinematic representation of Aboriginality reveals a series of familiar character stereotypes ranging from the noble savage, to the mystic other, to the tracker, among others. Although some of these character types are explored in the current literature, I am developing a more comprehensive character typology that can be fruitfully employed to explore the origins of key aspects of our cinematic representation of Aboriginality.

Dr Denitsa Filipova

Supervisors:

Prof Aleksandar Pavkovic and Prof Stephanie Lawson

Thesis title: 

Citizen's Voice in the Transitional Race to Democracy: Political Participation in CEE

AREAS OF RESEARCH:

Civil Society - Political Participation - Third Sector Development Post Communist Transitions - Democratization - Europeanisation and conditionality - Nationalism - Social capital - Institutional Change - Policy Making Styles - Agenda ownership - Education, employment and welfare states.

Dr Pip Gale

Supervisors:

Dr Tanya Evans, Prof Mary Spongberg

Thesis title:

The Medical and Social History of the Craniotomy in British Obstetrics in the Nineteenth Century

Craniotomy was a difficult and gruesome procedure, which involved surgically destroying the infant by crushing its head using a variety of instruments, in order to facilitate delivery. By the nineteenth century, British doctors accepted that, in cases where the infant was stuck in the mother's pelvis, this operation was necessary or else the mother would die undelivered. In fact, it was viewed as the traditional means of saving a woman's life in otherwise impossible labours. However, during the course of the nineteenth century, acceptance turned to criticism and condemnation. Using medical archives, my thesis will trace the debates around the usage of craniotomy in Britain with a view to explain how and why this shift occurred, the practice and philosophies around it, and the interrelationship between medicine and society. The key aim of my thesis is to reveal the attitudes of the doctors towards the practice of craniotomy and how these attitudes changed, reflected and shaped the ideologies and procedures of the time.

Dr Madeleine Hastie

Supervisor:

Prof Bridget Griffen-Foley, Prof Murray Goot

Thesis title:

A history of free-to-air commercial television in Sydney that involves a study of TCN-9, ATN-7 and TEN-10 from 1956 to the present day.

Research interest:

The history of print, radio and TV journalism and current affairs, military and social history, commemoration, history and memory and post-war popular culture.

Courtney Hercus

Supervisors:

Dr Noah Bassil,  Assoc Prof Morris Morley

Thesis title:

The Lost Discourses of International Economic Rights: A Critical Approach to the Construction of Human Rights

Dr Dorothy Kass

Supervisors:

Dr Mark Hearn, Dr Alison Holland

Thesis title:

The Nature Study Idea: Educational Reform and Environmental Concern in New South Wales, 1900-1920

Nature Study was a distinctively new subject, backed by a considerable ideological and pedagogical literature, introduced into elementary curricula throughout the English speaking world in the early years of the 20th Century. The subject was an important component of a new educational pedagogy, discussed and promoted as the "New Education" in a global interchange of ideas, to which Australian educators both referred and contributed. Research will attempt to trace the unfolding connections between the teaching of Nature Study in schools and the environmental issues and environmental perceptions of the period. Ideas, educational history and environmental history all form part of this research.

Publications:
  • Kass, Dorothy. "The Nature Study Idea in New South Wales: The Role of Charles Tucker Musson (1856-1928)", Historical Records of Australian Science, Vol. 24, no. 2 (2013), pp. 225-241.
  • Kass, Dorothy. "Early Bronze Coinage of Athens", Journal of the Numismatic Association of Australia, Vol. 21 (2010), pp. 11-23.
  • Kass, Dorothy. "Nature Study", Dictionary of Educational History in Australia and New Zealand (DEHANZ) Entry posted June 11, 2014. http://dehanz.net.au/entries/nature-study/
  • Kass, Dorothy " 'Big, brave, beautiful ideas': Nature Study in New South Wales Schools, 1904-1914",Podcast recorded as part of Royal Australian Historical Society's History is Hot Series, 9 October 2013. http://www.rahs.org.au/podcasts/history-is-hot-series-2/history-is-hot-9th-october/
Conference papers:
  • 2014. "Conscription Crisis in the Northern Rivers Region, New South Wales, 1916-1917", Australian Historical Association, University of Queensland.
  • 2014. "The Nature Study Idea: Framing Nature for Children in early Twentieth Century Schools", Framing Nature Conference, Tartu, Estonia.
  • 2014. "Man and Nature in New South Wales: Two early Considerations of the Environmental Effect of European Settlement", NewMac, University of Newcastle.
  • 2012. "The Nature Study Idea: Regarding the Earth in the Era of New Education, 1890s to 1920", ASLEC-ANZ (Association for the Study of Literature, Environment and Culture, Australia and New Zealand) Conference, Monash University.

Dr Carmel Kelleher

Supervisors:

Dr Alison Holland, Dr Mark Hearn

Thesis title:

Quarantine Station North Head: A Cultural History of a Working Station in the Twentieth Century

This thesis examines the history of the working station at North Head in the twentieth century. As an important national heritage site it has significant importance in its own right. Its present status as a cultural tourist site, in the hands of private enterprise, raises the need for a wider and more comprehensive and accurate understanding of its history, particularly in the twentieth century, as this time period has been largely discounted after the epidemics of the initial decades. The essential activity of Active Quarantine is examined through the important functions of fumigation and disinfection of ships and the Station's role during the pandemics and epidemics of plague, smallpox and influenza. The validity of the perceived decline of effective activity from the 1930s on is questioned, and evidence provided of continued though changing protective activity through the disinfection and fumigation of imported goods which could have affected primary industries.

The neglected area of the working life of the Station is explored to highlight and fill the gaps with relation to the role and identities of the resident work force. From the turn of the century there were constant demands, motivated by fear or commercial gain, to close or move the Station. However, its importance in public health procedures, and the continued threat from incoming diseases e.g . smallpox, yellow fever, contributed to its survival. In an extension of it protective role temporary housing was provided to those in need of shelter from instances of war, natural disaster and death, while its isolation and custodial background in a militarised area, allowed for the establishment of a detention centre.

As there is only one seminal history of the site this thesis draws heavily of archival sources which provide new avenues to explore the Station's continued vigilant practice of quarantine. The focus of this study on the twentieth century provides opportunities to explore some of the truly neglected areas of social and public history, challenging the focus on the spectacular, archaeology and the paranormal, which often disregards or denies the role of the Station and its forgotten workforce throughout most of the twentieth century.

Dr Jodi McAlister

Supervisors:

Dr Hsu-Ming Teo

Thesis title:

The Origins, Historical Evolution and Representations of the Virgin Heroine in English Literature

Female virginity has been a longstanding concern and fascination in Western society, and the phenomenal success of the virginity preoccupied Twilight and Fifty Shades of Grey shows that ideas of virginity and sexual purity are still culturally salient today. This thesis will examine the evolving roles, representations, and meanings of the virgin heroine in English literature. It will trace the historical and literary evolution of the virgin heroine before exploring her contemporary portrayals, particularly in popular romance fiction. It will compare virginity loss scenes in literature to autobiographical tales, and will attempt to discern narrative patterns. Ultimately, it will seek to elucidate why such emphasis is still placed on virginity in the modern romance genre despite changing social attitudes to women's sexuality in the West since the 1970s. It will also seek to explore the way virginity operates as a narrative trope, and how this has changed over time.

Publications and conference papers:
  • McAlister, Jodi. "The Virgin's Voice: Renaissance and Modern Readings of Virginity in The Changeling" at Virgin Envy, annual meeting of the Canadian Comparative Literature Association, University of Fredericton, May 29-31 2011.
  • McAlister, Jodi. "True Tales of the First Time: An Introduction to the Virginity Loss Confessional Genre", at Confessional Culture, conference, Monash University, 5-6 July 2012.
  • McAlister, Jodi. "Breaking the Hard Limits: Romance, Pornography, and Genre in the Fifty Shades trilogy", at National Pop Culture & American Culture Conference, romance area, 27-30 March 2013. (forthcoming)

Dr Carla Nolan

Carla's current research focus is Arab diaspora communities in Sydney, the 'Arab Spring' and political participation. Prior to studying at Macquarie Carla was based in the Middle East, firstly in Qatar where she worked on food security policy and education and arts development programs for the Qatari government, most recently she worked in Dubai as a Research Analyst for Emirates Airline.  Carla has travelled the Middle East extensively and is interested in political and social issues pertinent to the region. During her time abroad she was a guest contributor on Middle East issues for the Lowy Institute's blog, The Interpreter.

Carla has a Masters of Arts in International Relations and World Order from the University of Leicester and a Bachelor of Business from the University of Technology Sydney.  She is also a graduate of the Australian National Internships Program at ANU in Canberra.

Dr Mathew Radcliffe

Supervisors:

Prof. Sean Brawley, Dr. Hsu-Ming Teo

Thesis title:

Kampong Australia: The Experience of the Australian Military Community in Penang, 1955-1988

This thesis explores the experience of establishing and maintaining a large Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) base on the northwest coast of the Malay Peninsula at Butterworth from 1955 till 1988. It draws on official and private records to examine the complex social and cultural encounters and interactions that resulted between the large Australian military community and the many and varied local communities of Penang. It is the overall contention of this thesis that although one of the most substantial and indeed on-going means of engagement with Asia in the post-war period has been via Australian military deployments to the region, the many and varied social and cultural aspects of these engagements remain largely unrecognised, under-appreciated and unexplored. In this thesis, I argue that the social and cultural dimensions of Australian military deployments to Southeast Asia in the post-war period demand greater respect than has been afforded them in the extant historiography of Australia's Asian context. The case study of the RAAF base at Butterworth is used to highlight the significant social and cultural encounters and interactions at the heart of many of these Australian military deployments to Southeast Asia in the post-war period.

Publications:

Mathew Radcliffe, 'In Defence of White Australia: Discouraging 'Asian Marriage' in Postwar South-East Asia', Australian Historical Studies, Vol.45 (2), 2014.

Elizabeth Reid

Supervisors:

Dr Nicholas Baker, Prof Mary Spongberg

Thesis title:

Clothing Identities: Vice and Virtue in Florence 1348-1498

I research how the highly self-reflective society of Renaissance Florence constructed identity through clothing. Florentines utilized clothing in their debate concerning the place of religion, ritual, family, education, beauty, honesty and hierarchy in society. Renaissance Europe remains a key node in historical thinking about the development of modern western thought. My contribution to the emerging field of clothing history will synthesise formally distinct scholarly enquiries to produce a holistic discourse on Florentine self-fashioning. This will, in turn, shed light on the foundation of western society's continued interest in external appearance as a marker of internalized identity, belonging and character.

Publications:
  • Reid, Elizabeth, Ian Solomonides, 'Scholarship to Ethics and Sustainability: Student Engagement with Capability Development' Book chapter in Engagement with Learning in Higher Education, Libri, United Kingdom, 2012.
  • Reid, Elizabeth, Ian Solomonides, 'Diverse Transitions', First Year in Higher Education, 13th Pacific Rim First Year in Higher Education Conference, Adelaide, 2010 http://www.fyhe.com.au/past_papers/papers10/content/pdf/2C.pdf
  • Reid, Elizabeth, 'Renaissance Fashioning for Body and Spirit' in International Journal of the Arts in Society , Common Ground Publishing, Volume 4, Issue 1, 2010, pp.183-202.
  • Reid, Elizabeth, Anna Reid, Judi Homewood, Theresa Winchester-Seeto, 'Faculty Readiness for International Research Students; Views from the Edge', Australian Association for Research in Education, International Education Research Conference, Canberra, 2009, http://www.aare.edu.au/publications-database.php/4661/faculty-readiness-for-international-research-students-views-from-the-edge
  • Reid, Elizabeth, 'Picturing the Frame; A Students Perspective of Learning in the Arts', Book chapter in Enhancing Curricular: Towards the Scholarship of Teaching in Art, Design and Communication, CLTAD, 2004, pp. 693-704.
Conference papers:
  • Reid, Elizabeth, The (Dis)honesty of the Clothed Self in Renaissance Identity Creation, Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting, San Diego, 4-6 April 2013
  • Reid, Elizabeth, Heaven and Hell on Earth: Clothing, Memory and the Supernatural for Late Medieval Lay Women, Gender in Material Culture: Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, Bath Spa University, 4-6 Jan. 2013
  • Reid, Elizabeth, Nicholas Scott Baker, John Gagne 'Fashion, Politics and Deception in Early Modern Europe Discussion Panel', Stitches in Time Symposium, History Week, History Council NSW, 2012.
  • Reid, Elizabeth, 'Creatures of Vanity in Early Modern Europe' Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Conference, Otago, 2011.
  • Reid, Elizabeth, Ian Solomonides, 'Diverse Transitions' 13th Pacific Rim First Year in Higher Education Conference, Adelaide, 2010.
  • Reid, Elizabeth, 'Renaissance Fashioning for Body and Spirit', 4th International Conference for Arts in Society, Venice, 2009.
  • Reid, Elizabeth, Anna Reid, Judi Homewood, Theresa Winchester-Seeto, 'Faculty Readiness for International Research Students; Views from the Edge' Australian Association for Research in Education, International Education Research Conference, Canberra, 2009.
  • Reid Elizabeth, 'Picturing the Frame; A Students Perspective of Learning in the Arts', 2nd International Conference for the Centre for Learning and Teaching in Art and Design, Barcelona, 2004.
  • Honours Thesis, 'The Agents, Allegory and Spatial Experience of the Santa Maria del Fiore Last Judgment' The University of Sydney, 2008

Dr Lailufar Yasmin

Lailufar Yasmin started her PhD in Politics in Macquarie University in February, 2009. She received both EIPRS and MQRES to pursue her PhD degree. Before coming to Macquarie, she had been teaching in the Department of International Relations at the University of Dhaka, Bangladesh. She holds Bachelors in Social Sciences in International Relations from Dhaka University (DU-Bangladesh) and Masters in Social Sciences in the same subject from the same university. She also has a second Masters' in Arts in Women's Studies from Georgia State University (GSU) in Atlanta, Georgia, United States under the prestigious Fulbright Scholarship. Her research interests include political Islam and multiple modernities, South Asian politics, international terrorism and China's rise in global context.

Supervisors: 

Professor Stephanie Lawson

Thesis Title: 

Struggle for Recognition: Politics in the Islamic World after 9/11

The thesis looks at the way identity politics has been shaped in the Islamic world after 9/11. As the academic and political debates pose question on the 'modernity' of Islamic countries, this thesis looks at the way this debate is responded to by the Islamic countries. 9/11 brings about the whole issue of
civilisational debate between the West and Islamic countries, categorizing the latter as belonging to non-modern world. This thesis takes up the theoretical debate by looking at how modernity can be constituted in a way that can include the atypical Western and non-Western symbols to create indigenous modernity, if we may call it so. At the same time, it looks at the responses of Islamic countries in practice and tries to portray how they are caught in the debate of creating a 'modern' image and struggling to establish their own forms of identity. Because of the enormous nature of the subject matter, this thesis particularly looks at the politics of three Muslim-majority countries - Turkey, Pakistan and Bangladesh.

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